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Pictures | Tue Mar 8, 2011 | 1:06pm EST

International Women's Day

<p>Women dressed like men and wearing moustaches take part in No Rights No Women, expressing rejection to discrimination against women, marking International Women's Day in Beirut March 8, 2011. The protest is also part of a campaign demanding citizenship rights for children born by Lebanese women who are married to foreign men. REUTERS/Cynthia Karam </p>

Women dressed like men and wearing moustaches take part in No Rights No Women, expressing rejection to discrimination against women, marking International Women's Day in Beirut March 8, 2011. The protest is also part of a campaign demanding...more

Women dressed like men and wearing moustaches take part in No Rights No Women, expressing rejection to discrimination against women, marking International Women's Day in Beirut March 8, 2011. The protest is also part of a campaign demanding citizenship rights for children born by Lebanese women who are married to foreign men. REUTERS/Cynthia Karam

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<p>Women shout slogans as they march through central Ankara to commemorate International Women's Day March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Umit Bektas </p>

Women shout slogans as they march through central Ankara to commemorate International Women's Day March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Umit Bektas

Women shout slogans as they march through central Ankara to commemorate International Women's Day March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Umit Bektas

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<p>Member of the European Parliament Licia Ronzulli (R) of Italy holds her baby as she talks with fellow MEP Barbara Matera (L) during a voting session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg to mark the International Women's Day, March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler </p>

Member of the European Parliament Licia Ronzulli (R) of Italy holds her baby as she talks with fellow MEP Barbara Matera (L) during a voting session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg to mark the International Women's Day, March 8, 2011....more

Member of the European Parliament Licia Ronzulli (R) of Italy holds her baby as she talks with fellow MEP Barbara Matera (L) during a voting session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg to mark the International Women's Day, March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

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<p>A Muslim schoolgirl from St. Maaz high school practises Vietnam Vovinam martial arts inside the school compound on International Women's Day in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad March 8, 2011. Girls from ages 10 to 16 participate in weekly sessions of self-defence during school term. International Women's Day (IWD) was honoured the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on March 19, 1911. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women's rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. International Women's Day is observed every year across the globe to mark the efforts by women in various fields. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder </p>

A Muslim schoolgirl from St. Maaz high school practises Vietnam Vovinam martial arts inside the school compound on International Women's Day in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad March 8, 2011. Girls from ages 10 to 16 participate in weekly...more

A Muslim schoolgirl from St. Maaz high school practises Vietnam Vovinam martial arts inside the school compound on International Women's Day in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad March 8, 2011. Girls from ages 10 to 16 participate in weekly sessions of self-defence during school term. International Women's Day (IWD) was honoured the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on March 19, 1911. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women's rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. International Women's Day is observed every year across the globe to mark the efforts by women in various fields. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

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<p>Swiss Economy Minister Johann Schneider-Ammann (C) talks to Carmen Walker Spaeh (R) President of the women's section of the Swiss Liberal Free Democratic Party (FDP) and National Councillor Brigitta Gadient as he receives a piece of a carpet as a symbol to enhance the women's chance for equal payment, on the International Women's Day in Bern March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Michael Buholzer </p>

Swiss Economy Minister Johann Schneider-Ammann (C) talks to Carmen Walker Spaeh (R) President of the women's section of the Swiss Liberal Free Democratic Party (FDP) and National Councillor Brigitta Gadient as he receives a piece of a carpet as a...more

Swiss Economy Minister Johann Schneider-Ammann (C) talks to Carmen Walker Spaeh (R) President of the women's section of the Swiss Liberal Free Democratic Party (FDP) and National Councillor Brigitta Gadient as he receives a piece of a carpet as a symbol to enhance the women's chance for equal payment, on the International Women's Day in Bern March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Michael Buholzer

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<p>Women gather during a march to mark the upcoming International Women's Day in Mexico City, March 5, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (</p>

Women gather during a march to mark the upcoming International Women's Day in Mexico City, March 5, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (

Women gather during a march to mark the upcoming International Women's Day in Mexico City, March 5, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (

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<p>Afghan women listen to President Hamid Karzai's speech during an event to mark International Women's Day in Kabul March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Omar Sobhani </p>

Afghan women listen to President Hamid Karzai's speech during an event to mark International Women's Day in Kabul March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Omar Sobhani

Afghan women listen to President Hamid Karzai's speech during an event to mark International Women's Day in Kabul March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Omar Sobhani

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<p>Palestinians gesture during a demonstration to mark International Women's Day in the West Bank village of Burin near Nablus March 8, 2011. The banner reads in Arabic: "The general union of Palestinian women marks Women's Day. No to occupation. Yes to the right of return (for refugees). Yes for unity" (refering to the split between Hamas and the Fatah movement). REUTERS/Abed Omar Qusini </p>

Palestinians gesture during a demonstration to mark International Women's Day in the West Bank village of Burin near Nablus March 8, 2011. The banner reads in Arabic: "The general union of Palestinian women marks Women's Day. No to occupation. Yes to...more

Palestinians gesture during a demonstration to mark International Women's Day in the West Bank village of Burin near Nablus March 8, 2011. The banner reads in Arabic: "The general union of Palestinian women marks Women's Day. No to occupation. Yes to the right of return (for refugees). Yes for unity" (refering to the split between Hamas and the Fatah movement). REUTERS/Abed Omar Qusini

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<p>A Maoist supporter, holding signs with images of people who have been missing since the Nepali Civil War (1996-2006), demand a search for the missing people during a rally to mark International Women's Day in Kathmandu March 8, 2011. Thousands of women marched through the city demanding equal rights. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar </p>

A Maoist supporter, holding signs with images of people who have been missing since the Nepali Civil War (1996-2006), demand a search for the missing people during a rally to mark International Women's Day in Kathmandu March 8, 2011. Thousands of...more

A Maoist supporter, holding signs with images of people who have been missing since the Nepali Civil War (1996-2006), demand a search for the missing people during a rally to mark International Women's Day in Kathmandu March 8, 2011. Thousands of women marched through the city demanding equal rights. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

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<p>A female military pilot waits for the arrival of Spain's Defence Minister Carme Chacon (unseen) on International Women's Day, at Torrejon de Ardoz military airbase outside Madrid March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Andrea Comas </p>

A female military pilot waits for the arrival of Spain's Defence Minister Carme Chacon (unseen) on International Women's Day, at Torrejon de Ardoz military airbase outside Madrid March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Andrea Comas

A female military pilot waits for the arrival of Spain's Defence Minister Carme Chacon (unseen) on International Women's Day, at Torrejon de Ardoz military airbase outside Madrid March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Andrea Comas

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<p>Women attend an International Women's Day rally at Democracy Monument in Bangkok March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang </p>

Women attend an International Women's Day rally at Democracy Monument in Bangkok March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

Women attend an International Women's Day rally at Democracy Monument in Bangkok March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

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<p>A model demonstrates a a facial treatment for mainland Chinese visitors during an International Women's Day (IWD) cosmetics promotional event at a shopping mall in Hong Kong March 7, 2011, one day ahead of the 100th anniversary of IWD. REUTERS/Bobby Yip </p>

A model demonstrates a a facial treatment for mainland Chinese visitors during an International Women's Day (IWD) cosmetics promotional event at a shopping mall in Hong Kong March 7, 2011, one day ahead of the 100th anniversary of IWD. REUTERS/Bobby...more

A model demonstrates a a facial treatment for mainland Chinese visitors during an International Women's Day (IWD) cosmetics promotional event at a shopping mall in Hong Kong March 7, 2011, one day ahead of the 100th anniversary of IWD. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

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<p>Members from the Korean Women's Association United attend a flash mob to celebrate International Women's Day in central Seoul March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Truth Leem </p>

Members from the Korean Women's Association United attend a flash mob to celebrate International Women's Day in central Seoul March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Truth Leem

Members from the Korean Women's Association United attend a flash mob to celebrate International Women's Day in central Seoul March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Truth Leem

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<p>Hebe de Bonafini (C), leader of the human rights group Madres de Plaza de Mayo, stands with other members of the group as they gather in front of the Casa Rosada government house during an event to commemorate International Women's Day in Buenos Aires March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian </p>

Hebe de Bonafini (C), leader of the human rights group Madres de Plaza de Mayo, stands with other members of the group as they gather in front of the Casa Rosada government house during an event to commemorate International Women's Day in Buenos...more

Hebe de Bonafini (C), leader of the human rights group Madres de Plaza de Mayo, stands with other members of the group as they gather in front of the Casa Rosada government house during an event to commemorate International Women's Day in Buenos Aires March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian

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<p>Turkey's main opposition Republican People's Party MP Canan Aritman places a black wreath in the seat of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to mark the International Women's Day during a debate at the Turkish Parliament in Ankara March 8, 2011. The wreath reads "We demand the right to live". REUTERS/Stringer </p>

Turkey's main opposition Republican People's Party MP Canan Aritman places a black wreath in the seat of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to mark the International Women's Day during a debate at the Turkish Parliament in Ankara March 8, 2011. The...more

Turkey's main opposition Republican People's Party MP Canan Aritman places a black wreath in the seat of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to mark the International Women's Day during a debate at the Turkish Parliament in Ankara March 8, 2011. The wreath reads "We demand the right to live". REUTERS/Stringer

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<p>A woman holds a banner during a demonstration in Warsaw, Poland, March 6, 2011. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel </p>

A woman holds a banner during a demonstration in Warsaw, Poland, March 6, 2011. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel

A woman holds a banner during a demonstration in Warsaw, Poland, March 6, 2011. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel

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<p>Demonstrators hold up pieces of purple paper symbolizing the Women's Movement on International Women's Day in central Bilbao March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Vincent West </p>

Demonstrators hold up pieces of purple paper symbolizing the Women's Movement on International Women's Day in central Bilbao March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Vincent West

Demonstrators hold up pieces of purple paper symbolizing the Women's Movement on International Women's Day in central Bilbao March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Vincent West

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<p>Police officers stand guard in front of the government building during a protest by women from the opposition Socialist Party to mark International Women's Day, in Tirana March 8, 2011.  REUTERS/Arben Celi </p>

Police officers stand guard in front of the government building during a protest by women from the opposition Socialist Party to mark International Women's Day, in Tirana March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Arben Celi

Police officers stand guard in front of the government building during a protest by women from the opposition Socialist Party to mark International Women's Day, in Tirana March 8, 2011. REUTERS/Arben Celi

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<p>Naseema Dar (R), a 40-year-old "half-widow", sits next to her 14-year-old daughter Shabnum Mehraj and a photo of her husband Mehraj-ud-Din Dar in their house in Srinagar March 4, 2011. Naseema, a mother of two, is one of Kashmir's hundreds of "half-widows" -- women whose husbands have disappeared in 22 years of armed conflict with New Delhi. The Association for Parents of Disappeared Persons (APDP), an independent group fighting for the whereabouts of these missing relatives, says more than 8,000 people have gone missing, most of them following their arrests by Indian security forces in the troubled Kashmir region since a rebellion broke out at the end of 1989. Indian authorities, however, deny the allegations and argue that most of the missing persons have crossed the heavily militarised Line of Control, which divides Kashmir between India and Pakistan, for arms training. At least 2,000 of these disappeared people were married and nearly all were male and young at the time of their disappearances, the APDP adds. Most "half-widows" are from lower-income Muslim families and according to Islamic rules cannot remarry for at least seven years after their husbands go missing. "Many such women ... have been forced to leave their in-laws' homes and some of them returned to their parents," says Parveena Ahanger, a founder of APDP. "And others are lonely, struggling hard to rebuild their lives. Even after seven years of long wait men hesitate to marry such women. Many of them (men) fear their husbands may return one day." REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

Naseema Dar (R), a 40-year-old "half-widow", sits next to her 14-year-old daughter Shabnum Mehraj and a photo of her husband Mehraj-ud-Din Dar in their house in Srinagar March 4, 2011. Naseema, a mother of two, is one of Kashmir's hundreds of...more

Naseema Dar (R), a 40-year-old "half-widow", sits next to her 14-year-old daughter Shabnum Mehraj and a photo of her husband Mehraj-ud-Din Dar in their house in Srinagar March 4, 2011. Naseema, a mother of two, is one of Kashmir's hundreds of "half-widows" -- women whose husbands have disappeared in 22 years of armed conflict with New Delhi. The Association for Parents of Disappeared Persons (APDP), an independent group fighting for the whereabouts of these missing relatives, says more than 8,000 people have gone missing, most of them following their arrests by Indian security forces in the troubled Kashmir region since a rebellion broke out at the end of 1989. Indian authorities, however, deny the allegations and argue that most of the missing persons have crossed the heavily militarised Line of Control, which divides Kashmir between India and Pakistan, for arms training. At least 2,000 of these disappeared people were married and nearly all were male and young at the time of their disappearances, the APDP adds. Most "half-widows" are from lower-income Muslim families and according to Islamic rules cannot remarry for at least seven years after their husbands go missing. "Many such women ... have been forced to leave their in-laws' homes and some of them returned to their parents," says Parveena Ahanger, a founder of APDP. "And others are lonely, struggling hard to rebuild their lives. Even after seven years of long wait men hesitate to marry such women. Many of them (men) fear their husbands may return one day." REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Pink crosses made out of paper, each representing a woman who has been killed, are placed on a square in Cuernavaca March 7, 2011. REUTERS/Margarito Perez </p>

Pink crosses made out of paper, each representing a woman who has been killed, are placed on a square in Cuernavaca March 7, 2011. REUTERS/Margarito Perez

Pink crosses made out of paper, each representing a woman who has been killed, are placed on a square in Cuernavaca March 7, 2011. REUTERS/Margarito Perez

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