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Pictures | Tue Aug 25, 2020 | 11:47am EDT

Japanese ship scuttled after Mauritius oil spill

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Japan's Nagashiki Shipping, which owns the bulk carrier that ran aground on a reef in Mauritius and caused a large oil spill, said it has completed scuttling of the front part of the vessel as instructed by local authorities. The shipping company will continue planning with local authorities and specialists on the removal of the remaining part of the carrier from the reef, it said in a statement.

Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Japan's Nagashiki Shipping, which owns the bulk carrier that ran aground on...more

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Japan's Nagashiki Shipping, which owns the bulk carrier that ran aground on a reef in Mauritius and caused a large oil spill, said it has completed scuttling of the front part of the vessel as instructed by local authorities. The shipping company will continue planning with local authorities and specialists on the removal of the remaining part of the carrier from the reef, it said in a statement. Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS
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A part of the MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Mauritius said it would scuttle the ship's remains at sea in a way that would avoid further pollution or interfere with maritime routes, after taking in recommendations from various groups on how and where to sink the ship to conform with advice of French experts present on the island.

Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS

A part of the MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Mauritius said it would scuttle the ship's remains at sea in a way that would avoid further pollution or...more

A part of the MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Mauritius said it would scuttle the ship's remains at sea in a way that would avoid further pollution or interfere with maritime routes, after taking in recommendations from various groups on how and where to sink the ship to conform with advice of French experts present on the island. Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS
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A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground, is seen August 22, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO /via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground, is seen August 22, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO /via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground, is seen August 22, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO /via REUTERS
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A helicopter operates near the MV Wakashio which ran aground on a reef, in Mauritius August 22, 2020. Umbra Risk LTD/via REUTERS

A helicopter operates near the MV Wakashio which ran aground on a reef, in Mauritius August 22, 2020. Umbra Risk LTD/via REUTERS

A helicopter operates near the MV Wakashio which ran aground on a reef, in Mauritius August 22, 2020. Umbra Risk LTD/via REUTERS
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A part of the MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS

A part of the MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS

A part of the MV Wakashio that ran aground off Mauritius is pictured during a planned sinking of the stem section of the vessel, August 24, 2020. Mobilisation Nationale Wakashio/via REUTERS
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A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground, is seen off the coast of Mauritius, August 21, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO/via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground, is seen off the coast of Mauritius, August 21, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO/via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground, is seen off the coast of Mauritius, August 21, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO/via REUTERS
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A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground is seen August 21, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO /via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground is seen August 21, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO /via REUTERS

A part of the Japanese-owned bulk carrier MV Wakashio which ran aground is seen August 21, 2020. MOBILISATION NATIONALE WAKASHIO /via REUTERS
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Sunil Kumar Nandeshwar, the captain of the MV Wakashio, leaves from the courtroom after he was arrested and charged under the piracy and maritime violence act in Port Louis, Mauritius August 18, 2020. Defimedia Group/Handout via REUTERS

Sunil Kumar Nandeshwar, the captain of the MV Wakashio, leaves from the courtroom after he was arrested and charged under the piracy and maritime violence act in Port Louis, Mauritius August 18, 2020. Defimedia Group/Handout via REUTERS

Sunil Kumar Nandeshwar, the captain of the MV Wakashio, leaves from the courtroom after he was arrested and charged under the piracy and maritime violence act in Port Louis, Mauritius August 18, 2020. Defimedia Group/Handout via REUTERS
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A satellite image shows tug boats and the broken-up MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef causing an oil spill, off the coast of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritius in this mid-August handout. Satellite image ©2020 Maxar Technologies/Handout via REUTERS

A satellite image shows tug boats and the broken-up MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef causing an oil spill, off the coast of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritius in this mid-August handout. Satellite image ©2020 Maxar Technologies/Handout via REUTERS

A satellite image shows tug boats and the broken-up MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef causing an oil spill, off the coast of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritius in this mid-August handout. Satellite image ©2020 Maxar Technologies/Handout via REUTERS
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A coastline near Bois Des Amourettes is seen after the MV Wakashio struck a coral reef causing an oil spill, in Mauritius, August 18, 2020. Picture obtained by REUTERS

A coastline near Bois Des Amourettes is seen after the MV Wakashio struck a coral reef causing an oil spill, in Mauritius, August 18, 2020. Picture obtained by REUTERS

A coastline near Bois Des Amourettes is seen after the MV Wakashio struck a coral reef causing an oil spill, in Mauritius, August 18, 2020. Picture obtained by REUTERS
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A satellite image shows the broken-up Japanese bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio off the coast of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritius August 15, 2020. Satellite image ©2020 Maxar Technologies/Handout via REUTERS

A satellite image shows the broken-up Japanese bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio off the coast of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritius August 15, 2020. Satellite image ©2020 Maxar Technologies/Handout via REUTERS

A satellite image shows the broken-up Japanese bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio off the coast of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritius August 15, 2020. Satellite image ©2020 Maxar Technologies/Handout via REUTERS
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A coastline near Bois Des Amourettes is seen after Japanese bulk carrier MV Wakashio struck a coral reef causing an oil spill, in Mauritius, August 18, 2020. Picture obtained by REUTERS

A coastline near Bois Des Amourettes is seen after Japanese bulk carrier MV Wakashio struck a coral reef causing an oil spill, in Mauritius, August 18, 2020. Picture obtained by REUTERS

A coastline near Bois Des Amourettes is seen after Japanese bulk carrier MV Wakashio struck a coral reef causing an oil spill, in Mauritius, August 18, 2020. Picture obtained by REUTERS
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The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio after it broke apart, at the Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 16. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio after it broke apart, at the Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 16. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio after it broke apart, at the Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 16. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio that ran aground on a reef, is pictured at the Riviere des Creoles, August 13. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio that ran aground on a reef, is pictured at the Riviere des Creoles, August 13. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio that ran aground on a reef, is pictured at the Riviere des Creoles, August 13. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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A volunteer cleans oil spilled from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 12. REUTERS/Stephane Antoine

A volunteer cleans oil spilled from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 12. REUTERS/Stephane Antoine

A volunteer cleans oil spilled from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 12. REUTERS/Stephane Antoine
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A researcher holds a Bojer's skink lizard, a species endemic to Mauritius, recovered from a protected nature reserve on an island in the region of the oil spill, August 13. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A researcher holds a Bojer's skink lizard, a species endemic to Mauritius, recovered from a protected nature reserve on an island in the region of the oil spill, August 13. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A researcher holds a Bojer's skink lizard, a species endemic to Mauritius, recovered from a protected nature reserve on an island in the region of the oil spill, August 13. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. French Army command/via REUTERS

The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. French Army command/via REUTERS

The bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. French Army command/via REUTERS
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A starfish is seen in the Indian Ocean water near the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 12.   REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A starfish is seen in the Indian Ocean water near the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 12. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A starfish is seen in the Indian Ocean water near the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 12. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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The MV Wakashio in a satellite image, August 12.     ©2020 Maxar Technologies/via REUTERS

The MV Wakashio in a satellite image, August 12. ©2020 Maxar Technologies/via REUTERS

The MV Wakashio in a satellite image, August 12. ©2020 Maxar Technologies/via REUTERS
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A dead eel is seen floating following an oil leakage from the MV Wakashio on the Mahebourg waterfront, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A dead eel is seen floating following an oil leakage from the MV Wakashio on the Mahebourg waterfront, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A dead eel is seen floating following an oil leakage from the MV Wakashio on the Mahebourg waterfront, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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Spilled oil from the MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

Spilled oil from the MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

Spilled oil from the MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice
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A general view shows the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A general view shows the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A general view shows the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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Volunteers clean leaked oil from the MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

Volunteers clean leaked oil from the MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

Volunteers clean leaked oil from the MV Wakashio at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice
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The MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11.   French Army command/via REUTERS

The MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. French Army command/via REUTERS

The MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. French Army command/via REUTERS
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Barrels of leaked oil from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio are seen at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

Barrels of leaked oil from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio are seen at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

Barrels of leaked oil from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio are seen at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice
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A drone image shows fishermen on a boat as they volunteer near the area where the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio ran aground at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A drone image shows fishermen on a boat as they volunteer near the area where the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio ran aground at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A drone image shows fishermen on a boat as they volunteer near the area where the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio ran aground at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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A bucket with leaked oil is seen at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

A bucket with leaked oil is seen at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice

A bucket with leaked oil is seen at the Mahebourg Waterfront in Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Sumeet Mudhoo/L'Express Maurice
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A general view shows the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, in this handout image obtained August 10, 2020. French Army command/Handout via REUTERS

A general view shows the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, in this handout image obtained August 10, 2020. French Army command/Handout via REUTERS

A general view shows the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio, that ran aground on a reef, at Riviere des Creoles, Mauritius, in this handout image obtained August 10, 2020. French Army command/Handout via REUTERS
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A drone image shows materials prepared by volunteers to handle leaked oil from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Riviere des Creoles, on the Mahebourg waterfront, Mauritius, August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A drone image shows materials prepared by volunteers to handle leaked oil from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Riviere des Creoles, on the Mahebourg waterfront, Mauritius, August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay

A drone image shows materials prepared by volunteers to handle leaked oil from the bulk carrier ship MV Wakashio at the Riviere des Creoles, on the Mahebourg waterfront, Mauritius, August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Reuben Pillay
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