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Pictures | Tue Oct 11, 2022 | 7:59am EDT

Meet the 2022 Nobel Prize winners

A trio of U.S. economists including former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke won this year's Nobel Economics Prize for laying the foundation of how world powers now tackle global crises like the recent pandemic or the Great Recession of 2008.  


 REUTERS/Ken Cedeno

A trio of U.S. economists including former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke won this year's Nobel Economics Prize for laying the foundation of how world powers now tackle global crises like the recent pandemic or the Great Recession of 2008. ...more

A trio of U.S. economists including former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke won this year's Nobel Economics Prize for laying the foundation of how world powers now tackle global crises like the recent pandemic or the Great Recession of 2008. REUTERS/Ken Cedeno
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The trio, who also include Douglas Diamond (pictured in Chicago, after the win) and Philip Dybvig, won for their research on how regulating banks and propping up failing lenders with public cash can stave off an even deeper economic crisis, such as the Great Depression of the 1930s.  REUTERS/Jim Vondruska

The trio, who also include Douglas Diamond (pictured in Chicago, after the win) and Philip Dybvig, won for their research on how regulating banks and propping up failing lenders with public cash can stave off an even deeper economic crisis, such as...more

The trio, who also include Douglas Diamond (pictured in Chicago, after the win) and Philip Dybvig, won for their research on how regulating banks and propping up failing lenders with public cash can stave off an even deeper economic crisis, such as the Great Depression of the 1930s.  REUTERS/Jim Vondruska
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2 / 19
Philip Dybvig, poses in Boston after winning the Nobel Prize. “When my alarm went off, I noticed that I had hundreds of different kinds of messages and I thought, 'Wow, this is Nobel time. Lightning didn't strike, did it?' And I checked the Nobel Prize website,” said Dybvig.  
 

REUTERS/Amanda Sabga

Philip Dybvig, poses in Boston after winning the Nobel Prize. “When my alarm went off, I noticed that I had hundreds of different kinds of messages and I thought, 'Wow, this is Nobel time. Lightning didn't strike, did it?' And I checked the Nobel...more

Philip Dybvig, poses in Boston after winning the Nobel Prize. “When my alarm went off, I noticed that I had hundreds of different kinds of messages and I thought, 'Wow, this is Nobel time. Lightning didn't strike, did it?' And I checked the Nobel Prize website,” said Dybvig. REUTERS/Amanda Sabga
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3 / 19
Swedish geneticist Svante Paabo, who just won the 2022 Nobel Prize in Medicine, reacts after being thrown into the water by co-workers.   

REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

Swedish geneticist Svante Paabo, who just won the 2022 Nobel Prize in Medicine, reacts after being thrown into the water by co-workers. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

Swedish geneticist Svante Paabo, who just won the 2022 Nobel Prize in Medicine, reacts after being thrown into the water by co-workers. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner
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4 / 19
Paabo won for discoveries that underpin our understanding of how modern day people evolved from extinct ancestors at the dawn of human history. His work demonstrated practical implications during the COVID-19 pandemic when he found that people infected with the virus who carry a gene variant inherited from Neanderthals are more at risk of severe illness than whose who do not.   REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

Paabo won for discoveries that underpin our understanding of how modern day people evolved from extinct ancestors at the dawn of human history. His work demonstrated practical implications during the COVID-19 pandemic when he found that people...more

Paabo won for discoveries that underpin our understanding of how modern day people evolved from extinct ancestors at the dawn of human history. His work demonstrated practical implications during the COVID-19 pandemic when he found that people infected with the virus who carry a gene variant inherited from Neanderthals are more at risk of severe illness than whose who do not. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner
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5 / 19
Paabo, 67, said he thought the call from Sweden was a prank or something to do with his summer house there. "So I was just gulping down the last cup of tea to go and pick up my daughter at her nanny where she has had an overnight stay," Paabo said. "And then I got this call from Sweden and I of course thought it had something to do with our little summer house ... I thought the lawn mower had broken down or something."   REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

Paabo, 67, said he thought the call from Sweden was a prank or something to do with his summer house there. "So I was just gulping down the last cup of tea to go and pick up my daughter at her nanny where she has had an overnight stay," Paabo said....more

Paabo, 67, said he thought the call from Sweden was a prank or something to do with his summer house there. "So I was just gulping down the last cup of tea to go and pick up my daughter at her nanny where she has had an overnight stay," Paabo said. "And then I got this call from Sweden and I of course thought it had something to do with our little summer house ... I thought the lawn mower had broken down or something." REUTERS/Lisi Niesner
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6 / 19
Scientist Carolyn Bertozzi reacts at her home in Palo Alto, California after sharing the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Bertozzi, Morten Meldal and Barry Sharpless won for discovering reactions that let molecules snap together to create new compounds and that offer insight into cell biology.    


REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Scientist Carolyn Bertozzi reacts at her home in Palo Alto, California after sharing the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Bertozzi, Morten Meldal and Barry Sharpless won for discovering reactions that let molecules snap together to create new compounds and...more

Scientist Carolyn Bertozzi reacts at her home in Palo Alto, California after sharing the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Bertozzi, Morten Meldal and Barry Sharpless won for discovering reactions that let molecules snap together to create new compounds and that offer insight into cell biology. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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7 / 19
"I'm absolutely stunned, I'm sitting here and I can hardly breathe," Bertozzi said from California after the academy reached her by telephone with the news she had won. She added that as part of her work, she and her team managed to visualize and understand cell surface structures known as glycans, leading to a new idea in cancer immune therapy.  




REUTERS/Carlos Barria

"I'm absolutely stunned, I'm sitting here and I can hardly breathe," Bertozzi said from California after the academy reached her by telephone with the news she had won. She added that as part of her work, she and her team managed to visualize and...more

"I'm absolutely stunned, I'm sitting here and I can hardly breathe," Bertozzi said from California after the academy reached her by telephone with the news she had won. She added that as part of her work, she and her team managed to visualize and understand cell surface structures known as glycans, leading to a new idea in cancer immune therapy. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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8 / 19
Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Morten Meldal is applauded at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Medal described click chemistry as a way to build complex structures and link them as if they were pieces of Lego, the plastic construction toy.   



Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix

Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Morten Meldal is applauded at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Medal described click chemistry as a way to build complex structures and link them as if they were pieces of Lego, the plastic construction toy. ...more

Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Morten Meldal is applauded at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Medal described click chemistry as a way to build complex structures and link them as if they were pieces of Lego, the plastic construction toy. Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix
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9 / 19
The field of click chemistry and bioorthogonal chemistry has been harnessed to improve the targeting of cancer pharmaceuticals now being tested in clinical trials, along with a host of health, agricultural and industrial applications. "Combining simple chemical building blocks makes it possible to create an almost endless variety of molecules," the award-giving body said in a statement, adding that "sometimes simple answers are the best."    

  TT News Agency/Christine Olsson

The field of click chemistry and bioorthogonal chemistry has been harnessed to improve the targeting of cancer pharmaceuticals now being tested in clinical trials, along with a host of health, agricultural and industrial applications. "Combining...more

The field of click chemistry and bioorthogonal chemistry has been harnessed to improve the targeting of cancer pharmaceuticals now being tested in clinical trials, along with a host of health, agricultural and industrial applications. "Combining simple chemical building blocks makes it possible to create an almost endless variety of molecules," the award-giving body said in a statement, adding that "sometimes simple answers are the best."  TT News Agency/Christine Olsson
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10 / 19
Scientist John Clauser, winner of the 2022 Nobel Prize in Physics, reacts while talking with reporters at his home in Walnut Creek, California. Clauser, Alain Aspect and Anton Zeilinger won for experiments in quantum mechanics that laid the groundwork for rapidly-developing new applications in computing and cryptography.   




 REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Scientist John Clauser, winner of the 2022 Nobel Prize in Physics, reacts while talking with reporters at his home in Walnut Creek, California. Clauser, Alain Aspect and Anton Zeilinger won for experiments in quantum mechanics that laid the...more

Scientist John Clauser, winner of the 2022 Nobel Prize in Physics, reacts while talking with reporters at his home in Walnut Creek, California. Clauser, Alain Aspect and Anton Zeilinger won for experiments in quantum mechanics that laid the groundwork for rapidly-developing new applications in computing and cryptography. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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11 / 19
"I'm very happy ... I first started this work back in 1969 and I'm happy to still be alive to be able get the prize," Clauser, 79, told Reuters. Asked to explain his work in layman's terms, he joked he does not understand it himself but added that the interactions it describes permeate almost everything. "Probably every particle in the universe is entangled with every other particle," Clauser said, chuckling.   

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

"I'm very happy ... I first started this work back in 1969 and I'm happy to still be alive to be able get the prize," Clauser, 79, told Reuters. Asked to explain his work in layman's terms, he joked he does not understand it himself but added that...more

"I'm very happy ... I first started this work back in 1969 and I'm happy to still be alive to be able get the prize," Clauser, 79, told Reuters. Asked to explain his work in layman's terms, he joked he does not understand it himself but added that the interactions it describes permeate almost everything. "Probably every particle in the universe is entangled with every other particle," Clauser said, chuckling. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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12 / 19
French researcher Alain Aspect, a professor at Universite Paris-Saclay and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, said he was happy his work had contributed to settling the debate between Einstein, who was sceptical about quantum physics, and Niels Bohr, one of the field's fathers. Both won Nobel physics prizes. "Quantum physics, which has been fantastic field that has been on the agenda for more than a century, still offers a lot of mysteries to discover," Aspect, 75, told reporters. "This prize today anticipates what will be one day be quantum technologies."   


REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

French researcher Alain Aspect, a professor at Universite Paris-Saclay and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, said he was happy his work had contributed to settling the debate between Einstein, who was sceptical about quantum physics, and Niels Bohr,...more

French researcher Alain Aspect, a professor at Universite Paris-Saclay and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, said he was happy his work had contributed to settling the debate between Einstein, who was sceptical about quantum physics, and Niels Bohr, one of the field's fathers. Both won Nobel physics prizes. "Quantum physics, which has been fantastic field that has been on the agenda for more than a century, still offers a lot of mysteries to discover," Aspect, 75, told reporters. "This prize today anticipates what will be one day be quantum technologies." REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
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13 / 19
Austrian scientist Anton Zeilinger, 77, professor emeritus at the University of Vienna, told a news conference by phone after hearing the news that he was "shocked, but very positive." Zeilinger said that protected quantum communication over potentially thousands of kilometres via cables or satellite would soon be on the cards. "It is quite clear that in the near future we will have quantum communication all over the world," he said at the time.   



REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

Austrian scientist Anton Zeilinger, 77, professor emeritus at the University of Vienna, told a news conference by phone after hearing the news that he was "shocked, but very positive." Zeilinger said that protected quantum communication over...more

Austrian scientist Anton Zeilinger, 77, professor emeritus at the University of Vienna, told a news conference by phone after hearing the news that he was "shocked, but very positive." Zeilinger said that protected quantum communication over potentially thousands of kilometres via cables or satellite would soon be on the cards. "It is quite clear that in the near future we will have quantum communication all over the world," he said at the time. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
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14 / 19
French author Annie Ernaux won the 2022 Nobel Prize in Literature for "the courage and clinical acuity" in her largely autobiographical books examining personal memory and social inequality. In explaining its choice, the Swedish Academy said Ernaux, 82, "consistently and from different angles examines a life marked by strong disparities regarding gender, language and class".   

REUTERS/Johanna Geron

French author Annie Ernaux won the 2022 Nobel Prize in Literature for "the courage and clinical acuity" in her largely autobiographical books examining personal memory and social inequality. In explaining its choice, the Swedish Academy said Ernaux,...more

French author Annie Ernaux won the 2022 Nobel Prize in Literature for "the courage and clinical acuity" in her largely autobiographical books examining personal memory and social inequality. In explaining its choice, the Swedish Academy said Ernaux, 82, "consistently and from different angles examines a life marked by strong disparities regarding gender, language and class". REUTERS/Johanna Geron
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15 / 19
The first French woman to win the literature prize, Ernaux said winning was "a responsibility". Her debut novel was Les Armoires Vides in 1974 but she gained international recognition following the publication of Les Années in 2008, translated into The Years in 2017. "It is her most ambitious project, which has given her an international reputation and a raft of followers and literary disciples," the academy said of that book.      



REUTERS/Johanna Geron

The first French woman to win the literature prize, Ernaux said winning was "a responsibility". Her debut novel was Les Armoires Vides in 1974 but she gained international recognition following the publication of Les Années in 2008, translated into...more

The first French woman to win the literature prize, Ernaux said winning was "a responsibility". Her debut novel was Les Armoires Vides in 1974 but she gained international recognition following the publication of Les Années in 2008, translated into The Years in 2017. "It is her most ambitious project, which has given her an international reputation and a raft of followers and literary disciples," the academy said of that book. REUTERS/Johanna Geron
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16 / 19
Jailed Belarusian activist Ales Byalyatski (pictured), Russian rights group Memorial and Ukraine's Center for Civil Liberties won the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, amid a war in their region that is the worst conflict in Europe since World War Two.  


NTB/Rodrigo Freitas

Jailed Belarusian activist Ales Byalyatski (pictured), Russian rights group Memorial and Ukraine's Center for Civil Liberties won the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, amid a war in their region that is the worst conflict in Europe since World War...more

Jailed Belarusian activist Ales Byalyatski (pictured), Russian rights group Memorial and Ukraine's Center for Civil Liberties won the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, amid a war in their region that is the worst conflict in Europe since World War Two. NTB/Rodrigo Freitas
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17 / 19
Founded in 1989 to help the victims of political repression during the Soviet Union and their relatives, Memorial campaigns for democracy and civil rights in Russia and former Soviet republics.  

REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

Founded in 1989 to help the victims of political repression during the Soviet Union and their relatives, Memorial campaigns for democracy and civil rights in Russia and former Soviet republics. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

Founded in 1989 to help the victims of political repression during the Soviet Union and their relatives, Memorial campaigns for democracy and civil rights in Russia and former Soviet republics. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov
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18 / 19
The Center for Civil Liberties (CCL) said they were proud to be co-winner of this year's award. Employees at Ukraine's CCL said the win showed recognition of their work, but was also a "huge responsibility." 

REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko

The Center for Civil Liberties (CCL) said they were proud to be co-winner of this year's award. Employees at Ukraine's CCL said the win showed recognition of their work, but was also a "huge responsibility." REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko

The Center for Civil Liberties (CCL) said they were proud to be co-winner of this year's award. Employees at Ukraine's CCL said the win showed recognition of their work, but was also a "huge responsibility." REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
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19 / 19

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