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Pictures | Thu Nov 21, 2013 | 5:35pm EST

Ninjas in Brazil

<p>Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. Ninjitsu training, practiced by the shinobi also known as ninjas, involve unconventional warfare tactics, team infiltration and camouflage. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. Ninjitsu training, practiced by the shinobi also known as ninjas, involve unconventional warfare tactics, team...more

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. Ninjitsu training, practiced by the shinobi also known as ninjas, involve unconventional warfare tactics, team infiltration and camouflage. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>A master of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

A master of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A master of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>Marco Antonio Trotta, headmaster of the martial art Ninjutsu, performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013.  REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

Marco Antonio Trotta, headmaster of the martial art Ninjutsu, performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Marco Antonio Trotta, headmaster of the martial art Ninjutsu, performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013.  REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Students of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu perform during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>A master of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

A master of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A master of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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<p>A student of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares</p>

A student of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A student of the Japanese martial art Ninjutsu performs during training inside the Tijuca forest in Rio de Janeiro, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

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