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Pictures | Fri Oct 30, 2020 | 5:41pm EDT

NYC's Staten Islanders weigh in on election

Victoria Ferrara, 75, poses in front of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge on Staten Island. “The reason I voted for him is for all the things he said he’d do, which is what we wanted," says Ferrara. "People who voted him in didn’t not want another politician, we needed a businessman to straighten everything out. And I will vote for him again because he has done everything he said would do. Even in the face of adversity in the left, he’s done everything he said he would do.”  


REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Victoria Ferrara, 75, poses in front of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge on Staten Island. “The reason I voted for him is for all the things he said he’d do, which is what we wanted," says Ferrara. "People who voted him in didn’t not want another...more

Victoria Ferrara, 75, poses in front of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge on Staten Island. “The reason I voted for him is for all the things he said he’d do, which is what we wanted," says Ferrara. "People who voted him in didn’t not want another politician, we needed a businessman to straighten everything out. And I will vote for him again because he has done everything he said would do. Even in the face of adversity in the left, he’s done everything he said he would do.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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“I’m mad," says Ferrara, pictured (L) at a Trump rally in Staten Island. "All the Democratic governors and mayors of the cities and states that are in this situation, it’s not the whole country, they’ve created the divide. They’ve incited it.. They’ve made it grow worse. There wasn’t any of that kind of stuff. Not here. Not on Staten Island. Everybody talks to everybody. Everybody lives together. We have different ethnicities in this building alone and there's 84 families… so I don’t see what the problem is. This is nothing (referring to skin). We all bleed red. It’s just a skin color. And that annoys me that they’re actually preying on that and making us more hateful than we should be, or than we were.”    REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

“I’m mad," says Ferrara, pictured (L) at a Trump rally in Staten Island. "All the Democratic governors and mayors of the cities and states that are in this situation, it’s not the whole country, they’ve created the divide. They’ve incited it.....more

“I’m mad," says Ferrara, pictured (L) at a Trump rally in Staten Island. "All the Democratic governors and mayors of the cities and states that are in this situation, it’s not the whole country, they’ve created the divide. They’ve incited it.. They’ve made it grow worse. There wasn’t any of that kind of stuff. Not here. Not on Staten Island. Everybody talks to everybody. Everybody lives together. We have different ethnicities in this building alone and there's 84 families… so I don’t see what the problem is. This is nothing (referring to skin). We all bleed red. It’s just a skin color. And that annoys me that they’re actually preying on that and making us more hateful than we should be, or than we were.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Artist Scott LoBaido, 55, an artist who calls himself Trump's biggest supporter on the East Coast, at his studio on Staten Island. "MAGA. Same thing that Ronald Regan did. My life is built around patriotism, says LoBaido. "And what is patriotism? To love your country. And to show what's great about your country. And as I said that’s my job. And the 70’s were rough and then the 80’s, Ronald Regan stepped in. And then he said - I get choked up when I think about it - he said “That shining city on the hill. America.” He brought us back waving our flag again. Being proud. Not being like “we’re better than you” No. Just being like, you know, a patriotic community is a prosperous community. And then we lost it again. And this is what this guy’s doing. He’s talking to me. He’s not a politician. Both sides of the past ten years were fed up with the establishment. The left and the right. That’s why the extreme Bernie Sanders, and the extreme Donald Trump popped up. He’s not a politician." 



REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Artist Scott LoBaido, 55, an artist who calls himself Trump's biggest supporter on the East Coast, at his studio on Staten Island. "MAGA. Same thing that Ronald Regan did. My life is built around patriotism, says LoBaido. "And what is patriotism? To...more

Artist Scott LoBaido, 55, an artist who calls himself Trump's biggest supporter on the East Coast, at his studio on Staten Island. "MAGA. Same thing that Ronald Regan did. My life is built around patriotism, says LoBaido. "And what is patriotism? To love your country. And to show what's great about your country. And as I said that’s my job. And the 70’s were rough and then the 80’s, Ronald Regan stepped in. And then he said - I get choked up when I think about it - he said “That shining city on the hill. America.” He brought us back waving our flag again. Being proud. Not being like “we’re better than you” No. Just being like, you know, a patriotic community is a prosperous community. And then we lost it again. And this is what this guy’s doing. He’s talking to me. He’s not a politician. Both sides of the past ten years were fed up with the establishment. The left and the right. That’s why the extreme Bernie Sanders, and the extreme Donald Trump popped up. He’s not a politician." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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A blue line, painted by artist Scott LoBaido in support of the police, on a median strip along Hylan Boulevard on Staten Island. “Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, which is one of the biggest liberal cities in the world," says LoBaido. "But I compare Staten Island to, and I know this from experience, that little town in West Virginia, that little coal mine town in Wyoming, or a little factory town, where it’s working people. Not that nobody else works in this city, but here is where the dirty hands are. This is where people get their hands dirty. Cops, firemen, sanitation. My father was a sanitation man, picked up garbage for 25 years. Oh yeah. Ugliest job you can have. But it paid good and all he cared about was feeding his kids, paying his mortgage. And never complained. And that’s the kind of community this is. This is a working class community."   
 REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A blue line, painted by artist Scott LoBaido in support of the police, on a median strip along Hylan Boulevard on Staten Island. “Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, which is one of the biggest liberal cities in the world,"...more

A blue line, painted by artist Scott LoBaido in support of the police, on a median strip along Hylan Boulevard on Staten Island. “Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, which is one of the biggest liberal cities in the world," says LoBaido. "But I compare Staten Island to, and I know this from experience, that little town in West Virginia, that little coal mine town in Wyoming, or a little factory town, where it’s working people. Not that nobody else works in this city, but here is where the dirty hands are. This is where people get their hands dirty. Cops, firemen, sanitation. My father was a sanitation man, picked up garbage for 25 years. Oh yeah. Ugliest job you can have. But it paid good and all he cared about was feeding his kids, paying his mortgage. And never complained. And that’s the kind of community this is. This is a working class community." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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“So it's crazy times. But it’s life," says LoBaido. "America is crazy. A sexy beast. If I just hung out with conservatives all the time, I’d cut my wrist. If I just hung out with liberals, I’d cut my wrist. We have to have that friction. It makes it exciting. Not always pretty. But it makes it exciting."   REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

“So it's crazy times. But it’s life," says LoBaido. "America is crazy. A sexy beast. If I just hung out with conservatives all the time, I’d cut my wrist. If I just hung out with liberals, I’d cut my wrist. We have to have that friction. It makes it...more

“So it's crazy times. But it’s life," says LoBaido. "America is crazy. A sexy beast. If I just hung out with conservatives all the time, I’d cut my wrist. If I just hung out with liberals, I’d cut my wrist. We have to have that friction. It makes it exciting. Not always pretty. But it makes it exciting." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Sal Finocchiaro, 51, prepares pizza at Palermo Pizzeria and Restaurant, which he co-owns. “Staten Island is very outspoken, we have all the rebels from the outer boroughs end up here in Staten Island, a lot of small business owners. We realize that our politicians are crippling us and our president wants to help us out so that’s why everybody is red here, says Finocchiaro. “I’m absolutely a Trump supporter 5000%.”  


REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Sal Finocchiaro, 51, prepares pizza at Palermo Pizzeria and Restaurant, which he co-owns. “Staten Island is very outspoken, we have all the rebels from the outer boroughs end up here in Staten Island, a lot of small business owners. We realize that...more

Sal Finocchiaro, 51, prepares pizza at Palermo Pizzeria and Restaurant, which he co-owns. “Staten Island is very outspoken, we have all the rebels from the outer boroughs end up here in Staten Island, a lot of small business owners. We realize that our politicians are crippling us and our president wants to help us out so that’s why everybody is red here, says Finocchiaro. “I’m absolutely a Trump supporter 5000%.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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“I probably was a New Yorker first until a few years ago, but I’m definitely a Staten Islander first now," says Finocchiaro. "I haven’t gone to Manhattan in months. I don’t feel comfortable there. My wife wanted to go in this morning to do some shopping but I really don’t feel like having my car pounded on. You stop at a red light and you have protesters and they’re pounding on your car and everything so I'm not into that. But Staten Island. I definitely feel at home. It’s a red borough and we’re all on the same page. Majority of the people out here are civil servants, business owners, regular people just trying to make a living. So that’s why they like the red.”  


REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

“I probably was a New Yorker first until a few years ago, but I’m definitely a Staten Islander first now," says Finocchiaro. "I haven’t gone to Manhattan in months. I don’t feel comfortable there. My wife wanted to go in this morning to do some...more

“I probably was a New Yorker first until a few years ago, but I’m definitely a Staten Islander first now," says Finocchiaro. "I haven’t gone to Manhattan in months. I don’t feel comfortable there. My wife wanted to go in this morning to do some shopping but I really don’t feel like having my car pounded on. You stop at a red light and you have protesters and they’re pounding on your car and everything so I'm not into that. But Staten Island. I definitely feel at home. It’s a red borough and we’re all on the same page. Majority of the people out here are civil servants, business owners, regular people just trying to make a living. So that’s why they like the red.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Detective Raymond Wittick, 51, a Staten Island Welfare Officer with the Detectives' Endowment Association, poses next to an NYPD vehicle. “Most New Yorkers, along with Staten Islanders, you know, want law and order, they want to feel safe when they walk in the streets, when they go to events, to the park, they wanna feel safe in their homes," says Wittick. “Our union has also endorsed President Trump. We as a delegate body, you know as the board officers, we got together and we discussed it, we put it out to our delegate body and our delegate body put it out to all of our members across the city. We polled our detectives throughout the city on what they thought and overwhelmingly the support came back that they would support Trump for President."    


REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Detective Raymond Wittick, 51, a Staten Island Welfare Officer with the Detectives' Endowment Association, poses next to an NYPD vehicle. “Most New Yorkers, along with Staten Islanders, you know, want law and order, they want to feel safe when they...more

Detective Raymond Wittick, 51, a Staten Island Welfare Officer with the Detectives' Endowment Association, poses next to an NYPD vehicle. “Most New Yorkers, along with Staten Islanders, you know, want law and order, they want to feel safe when they walk in the streets, when they go to events, to the park, they wanna feel safe in their homes," says Wittick. “Our union has also endorsed President Trump. We as a delegate body, you know as the board officers, we got together and we discussed it, we put it out to our delegate body and our delegate body put it out to all of our members across the city. We polled our detectives throughout the city on what they thought and overwhelmingly the support came back that they would support Trump for President." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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A 'Back the Blue' sign over a roadway in Staten Island. “Morale is definitely down very close to like an all-time low from what I’ve seen, you know from being a Union Representative. I speak to detectives on a regular basis about everything that goes on. And a lot of guys are discouraged with the way everybody looks at the police department now," says Wittick. “I feel that most members of the Republican party support law enforcement and what we go through every day.”  


REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A 'Back the Blue' sign over a roadway in Staten Island. “Morale is definitely down very close to like an all-time low from what I’ve seen, you know from being a Union Representative. I speak to detectives on a regular basis about everything that goes...more

A 'Back the Blue' sign over a roadway in Staten Island. “Morale is definitely down very close to like an all-time low from what I’ve seen, you know from being a Union Representative. I speak to detectives on a regular basis about everything that goes on. And a lot of guys are discouraged with the way everybody looks at the police department now," says Wittick. “I feel that most members of the Republican party support law enforcement and what we go through every day.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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A lawn sign and halloween decoration in support of the Republican Party on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A lawn sign and halloween decoration in support of the Republican Party on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A lawn sign and halloween decoration in support of the Republican Party on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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People pose with a cardboard cutout of President Trump at the New York Triumph Rally on Staten Island, October 3.  
 REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

People pose with a cardboard cutout of President Trump at the New York Triumph Rally on Staten Island, October 3. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

People pose with a cardboard cutout of President Trump at the New York Triumph Rally on Staten Island, October 3. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Aaron Schumacher (2nd L), 33, has his hair cut at Craig & Pop's Barbershop on Staten Island. “I think there are gonna be more riots and they're gonna get worse. I don’t think the election is gonna be fair. The Democratic party is tied into the media. They're telling a story that’s not true and people are believing it. They’re basically saying that if you vote red you’re a racist and that’s not true at all, that’s a fake story. And they keep going with it," says Schumacher. “Their message is Republicans don’t care about the environment, they're racist. They cannot fathom a conscientious person as a Republican. They think we’re all very selfish. But we just wanna take care of ourselves and our family. And we don’t care what you do. If you wanna be transgender or gay go ahead and do it, this is a free country, enjoy your life. Everybody wants people to be happy. So I think they’ve got a mixed message there. And they’re lying to give a mixed message and make us look evil and people get conned into these groups. It feels like the democratic party is a popularity thing, you know being liked.” 

REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Aaron Schumacher (2nd L), 33, has his hair cut at Craig & Pop's Barbershop on Staten Island. “I think there are gonna be more riots and they're gonna get worse. I don’t think the election is gonna be fair. The Democratic party is tied into the media....more

Aaron Schumacher (2nd L), 33, has his hair cut at Craig & Pop's Barbershop on Staten Island. “I think there are gonna be more riots and they're gonna get worse. I don’t think the election is gonna be fair. The Democratic party is tied into the media. They're telling a story that’s not true and people are believing it. They’re basically saying that if you vote red you’re a racist and that’s not true at all, that’s a fake story. And they keep going with it," says Schumacher. “Their message is Republicans don’t care about the environment, they're racist. They cannot fathom a conscientious person as a Republican. They think we’re all very selfish. But we just wanna take care of ourselves and our family. And we don’t care what you do. If you wanna be transgender or gay go ahead and do it, this is a free country, enjoy your life. Everybody wants people to be happy. So I think they’ve got a mixed message there. And they’re lying to give a mixed message and make us look evil and people get conned into these groups. It feels like the democratic party is a popularity thing, you know being liked.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Peggy Padovano, 63, a legal assistant, poses in the doorway of her home. “Ninety percent of my friends are like minded and those that aren’t we agree to disagree, because we’re adults," says Padovano. "We’re not crazy kids that go out and loot and stuff like that. We understand how the Democrat party has changed over the years. It’s not the Kennedy democratic party any more. Its progressive, it’s violent, it’s corrupt, it’s horrible.”  

REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Peggy Padovano, 63, a legal assistant, poses in the doorway of her home. “Ninety percent of my friends are like minded and those that aren’t we agree to disagree, because we’re adults," says Padovano. "We’re not crazy kids that go out and loot and...more

Peggy Padovano, 63, a legal assistant, poses in the doorway of her home. “Ninety percent of my friends are like minded and those that aren’t we agree to disagree, because we’re adults," says Padovano. "We’re not crazy kids that go out and loot and stuff like that. We understand how the Democrat party has changed over the years. It’s not the Kennedy democratic party any more. Its progressive, it’s violent, it’s corrupt, it’s horrible.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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“Conservatives don’t approve of abortion at all, but I’m not a conservative, I’m an extremely moderate republican," says Padovano. "I have a gay brother, my sisters have been divorced, one had an abortion. So my husband and my view on that is very much where the democrats are to a point. I believe that if a woman needs to have an abortion for the three reasons that were always there that’s fine. But they’re the party of the late term abortions, how could you even talk to me about morals. That’s where I strongly disagree. I would like to see what they consider to be immoral about Republicans, because from what I can see, of course they’re not perfect, but they are not for slaughtering a child upon birth. Nobody I know could ever condone that. Most of the people I know are very hard-working people who give to lots of charities.”  
   REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

“Conservatives don’t approve of abortion at all, but I’m not a conservative, I’m an extremely moderate republican," says Padovano. "I have a gay brother, my sisters have been divorced, one had an abortion. So my husband and my view on that is very...more

“Conservatives don’t approve of abortion at all, but I’m not a conservative, I’m an extremely moderate republican," says Padovano. "I have a gay brother, my sisters have been divorced, one had an abortion. So my husband and my view on that is very much where the democrats are to a point. I believe that if a woman needs to have an abortion for the three reasons that were always there that’s fine. But they’re the party of the late term abortions, how could you even talk to me about morals. That’s where I strongly disagree. I would like to see what they consider to be immoral about Republicans, because from what I can see, of course they’re not perfect, but they are not for slaughtering a child upon birth. Nobody I know could ever condone that. Most of the people I know are very hard-working people who give to lots of charities.” REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Anthony Granata (R) of Staten Island displays merchandise to shoppers at a roadside stall on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Anthony Granata (R) of Staten Island displays merchandise to shoppers at a roadside stall on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Anthony Granata (R) of Staten Island displays merchandise to shoppers at a roadside stall on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Junior baseball players with the Cadets 16u-Outerie are seen in their dugout during a game at the New Springville Little League on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Junior baseball players with the Cadets 16u-Outerie are seen in their dugout during a game at the New Springville Little League on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Junior baseball players with the Cadets 16u-Outerie are seen in their dugout during a game at the New Springville Little League on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Campaign material and a map of Staten Island at the Staten Island Republican Party headquarters.  REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Campaign material and a map of Staten Island at the Staten Island Republican Party headquarters. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Campaign material and a map of Staten Island at the Staten Island Republican Party headquarters. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Supporters of President Trump at the New York Triumph Rally held on Staten Island, October 3. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Supporters of President Trump at the New York Triumph Rally held on Staten Island, October 3. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Supporters of President Trump at the New York Triumph Rally held on Staten Island, October 3. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Signage promoting Republican congressional candidate for New York's 11th district Nicole Malliotakis on Staten Island.  
 REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Signage promoting Republican congressional candidate for New York's 11th district Nicole Malliotakis on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Signage promoting Republican congressional candidate for New York's 11th district Nicole Malliotakis on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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A parishioner wears a "Freedom" shirt while attending a mass at Saint Paul's United Methodist Church on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A parishioner wears a "Freedom" shirt while attending a mass at Saint Paul's United Methodist Church on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A parishioner wears a "Freedom" shirt while attending a mass at Saint Paul's United Methodist Church on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Members of the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) Rescue 5 stand for the national anthem during a ceremony belatedly held to commemorate fire personnel lost in the September 11 attacks, on Staten Island, October 7. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Members of the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) Rescue 5 stand for the national anthem during a ceremony belatedly held to commemorate fire personnel lost in the September 11 attacks, on Staten Island, October 7. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Members of the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) Rescue 5 stand for the national anthem during a ceremony belatedly held to commemorate fire personnel lost in the September 11 attacks, on Staten Island, October 7. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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Signs in support of President Trump outside a house on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Signs in support of President Trump outside a house on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Signs in support of President Trump outside a house on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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People stand for the national anthem during an outdoor performance by The Patriot Brass Ensemble at the American Legion Cespino-Russo Post #1544 on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

People stand for the national anthem during an outdoor performance by The Patriot Brass Ensemble at the American Legion Cespino-Russo Post #1544 on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

People stand for the national anthem during an outdoor performance by The Patriot Brass Ensemble at the American Legion Cespino-Russo Post #1544 on Staten Island. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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The Staten Island Ferry with the island of Manhattan in the background. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

The Staten Island Ferry with the island of Manhattan in the background. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

The Staten Island Ferry with the island of Manhattan in the background. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
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