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Parched American West faces extreme drought

An aerial view shows Elizabeth Lake, which has been dried up for several years, as the region experiences extreme heat and drought conditions, in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows Elizabeth Lake, which has been dried up for several years, as the region experiences extreme heat and drought conditions, in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows Elizabeth Lake, which has been dried up for several years, as the region experiences extreme heat and drought conditions, in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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A view of Elizabeth Lake, an unincorporated community in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A view of Elizabeth Lake, an unincorporated community in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A view of Elizabeth Lake, an unincorporated community in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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A view of Elizabeth Lake in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A view of Elizabeth Lake in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A view of Elizabeth Lake in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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A welcome sign is seen on Elizabeth Lake road, near Elizabeth Lake and Lake Hughes in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A welcome sign is seen on Elizabeth Lake road, near Elizabeth Lake and Lake Hughes in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A welcome sign is seen on Elizabeth Lake road, near Elizabeth Lake and Lake Hughes in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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An aerial view shows Elizabeth Lake, which has been dried up for several years, in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows Elizabeth Lake, which has been dried up for several years, in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows Elizabeth Lake, which has been dried up for several years, in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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An aerial view shows houseboats anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows houseboats anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows houseboats anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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An aerial view shows low water levels at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows low water levels at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. ...more

An aerial view shows low water levels at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
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Low water levels are visible through the burned trees from the 2020 Bear fire at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Low water levels are visible through the burned trees from the 2020 Bear fire at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Low water levels are visible through the burned trees from the 2020 Bear fire at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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A view of a dried-up Elizabeth Lake in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A view of a dried-up Elizabeth Lake in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A view of a dried-up Elizabeth Lake in Los Angeles County, California, June 18, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Smoke from wildfires hangs low in the valleys of the Uinta Mountains in eastern Utah, June 21, 2021. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

Smoke from wildfires hangs low in the valleys of the Uinta Mountains in eastern Utah, June 21, 2021. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

Smoke from wildfires hangs low in the valleys of the Uinta Mountains in eastern Utah, June 21, 2021. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
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Salvador Parra, manager at Burford Ranch, is seen with a garlic crop he is preparing to harvest and sell, in Cantua Creek, California, June 15, 2021. California's worst drought since 1977 has forced Parra to leave fallow 2,000 of his 6,000 acres and dig deep for water to save the crops already planted. "There's not very much being grown out there, just because there's no water. There's literally no water," said Parra. In a good year, the ranch grows everything from garlic, onions, tomatoes and alfalfa to cotton. This year, Parra needs emergency water sources just to bring a reduced crop to harvest. One well he is depending on is 800 feet (244 m) deep "and we're having to pump it all the way up to the surface so that we can irrigate our crops."

REUTERS/Norma Galeana

Salvador Parra, manager at Burford Ranch, is seen with a garlic crop he is preparing to harvest and sell, in Cantua Creek, California, June 15, 2021. California's worst drought since 1977 has forced Parra to leave fallow 2,000 of his 6,000 acres and...more

Salvador Parra, manager at Burford Ranch, is seen with a garlic crop he is preparing to harvest and sell, in Cantua Creek, California, June 15, 2021. California's worst drought since 1977 has forced Parra to leave fallow 2,000 of his 6,000 acres and dig deep for water to save the crops already planted. "There's not very much being grown out there, just because there's no water. There's literally no water," said Parra. In a good year, the ranch grows everything from garlic, onions, tomatoes and alfalfa to cotton. This year, Parra needs emergency water sources just to bring a reduced crop to harvest. One well he is depending on is 800 feet (244 m) deep "and we're having to pump it all the way up to the surface so that we can irrigate our crops." REUTERS/Norma Galeana
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Houseboats are anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Houseboats are anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16,...more

Houseboats are anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
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A buoy and its concrete anchor lay on the dry ground at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerruci

A buoy and its concrete anchor lay on the dry ground at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerruci

A buoy and its concrete anchor lay on the dry ground at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerruci
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Trees burned during the 2020 Bear fire, and low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Trees burned during the 2020 Bear fire, and low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Trees burned during the 2020 Bear fire, and low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Houseboats removed because current low water levels might damage them, sit on a parking lot at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Houseboats removed because current low water levels might damage them, sit on a parking lot at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Houseboats removed because current low water levels might damage them, sit on a parking lot at Lake Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Dryland is visible, at a section that is normally underwater, on the banks of Lake Oroville, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Dryland is visible, at a section that is normally underwater, on the banks of Lake Oroville, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Dryland is visible, at a section that is normally underwater, on the banks of Lake Oroville, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Low water levels are visible under the Enterprise Bridge at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Low water levels are visible under the Enterprise Bridge at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Low water levels are visible under the Enterprise Bridge at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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A floating security barrier is seen at a section that used to be underwater at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

A floating security barrier is seen at a section that used to be underwater at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near...more

A floating security barrier is seen at a section that used to be underwater at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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An areal view of Bidwell Bar Bridge shows the water level at Lake Oroville, the second-largest reservoir in California, which is now at less than 50 percent capacity, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An areal view of Bidwell Bar Bridge shows the water level at Lake Oroville, the second-largest reservoir in California, which is now at less than 50 percent capacity, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An areal view of Bidwell Bar Bridge shows the water level at Lake Oroville, the second-largest reservoir in California, which is now at less than 50 percent capacity, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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Signs notify a boat launch is closed because of low water levels due to drought in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Signs notify a boat launch is closed because of low water levels due to drought in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Signs notify a boat launch is closed because of low water levels due to drought in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
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Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

Low water levels due to drought are seen in the Hoover Dam reservoir of Lake Mead near Las Vegas, Nevada, June 9, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
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Houseboats are anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Houseboats are anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

Houseboats are anchored in low water levels at Lake Oroville, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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An aerial view shows weeds growing from a boat launch ramp at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci

An aerial view shows weeds growing from a boat launch ramp at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville,...more

An aerial view shows weeds growing from a boat launch ramp at Lake Oroville, which is the second-largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity, near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aude Guerrucci
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