Edition:
United States
Pictures | Thu Dec 10, 2009 | 9:40am EST

Pictures of the Decade Part 5

<p>Climate activists Lesley Butler and Rob Bell "sunbathe" on the edge of a frozen fjord in the Norwegian Arctic town of Longyearbyen.    
 
Global warming became one of the world's major concerns of the decade amid mounting evidence that human activity is disrupting the climate. By 2007 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was saying it was "very likely" - at least 90 percent certain -- that humans are to blame for most of the observed warming trend of the past 50 years. It also said that warming of the planet was "unequivocal."         
Taken on April 25, 2007 by Francois Lenoir</p>

Climate activists Lesley Butler and Rob Bell "sunbathe" on the edge of a frozen fjord in the Norwegian Arctic town of Longyearbyen. Global warming became one of the world's major concerns of the decade amid mounting evidence that human activity...more

Climate activists Lesley Butler and Rob Bell "sunbathe" on the edge of a frozen fjord in the Norwegian Arctic town of Longyearbyen. Global warming became one of the world's major concerns of the decade amid mounting evidence that human activity is disrupting the climate. By 2007 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was saying it was "very likely" - at least 90 percent certain -- that humans are to blame for most of the observed warming trend of the past 50 years. It also said that warming of the planet was "unequivocal." Taken on April 25, 2007 by Francois Lenoir

Close
1 / 10
<p>A young Afghan woman shows her face in public for the first time after 5 years of Taliban Sharia law .    After the Taliban was overthrown in Afghanistan in 2001, women were allowed to return to work and education with this young Afghan woman showing her face in public for the first time after 5 years of Taliban Sharia law. Under its strict interpretation of Islam, the Taliban ordered all women hidden behind head-to-toe burqas. But Afghan women remain among the worst off in the world, according to  a recent report by Human Rights Watch, with violence against them "endemic" and the government failing to protect them from crimes such as rape and even murder.
        
Taken on November 14, 2001 by Yannis Behrakis       </p>

A young Afghan woman shows her face in public for the first time after 5 years of Taliban Sharia law . After the Taliban was overthrown in Afghanistan in 2001, women were allowed to return to work and education with this young Afghan woman showing...more

A young Afghan woman shows her face in public for the first time after 5 years of Taliban Sharia law . After the Taliban was overthrown in Afghanistan in 2001, women were allowed to return to work and education with this young Afghan woman showing her face in public for the first time after 5 years of Taliban Sharia law. Under its strict interpretation of Islam, the Taliban ordered all women hidden behind head-to-toe burqas. But Afghan women remain among the worst off in the world, according to a recent report by Human Rights Watch, with violence against them "endemic" and the government failing to protect them from crimes such as rape and even murder. Taken on November 14, 2001 by Yannis Behrakis

Close
2 / 10
<p>A man rinses soot from his face at the scene of a gas pipeline explosion near Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos.     
 
 
Nigeria's dilapidated oil pipeline network, built in the late 1970s but poorly maintained, has taken its toll on human lives and the industry over the decade. Vandalism by oil thieves, attacks by militants and frequent explosions when civilians try to scoop up oil leaking from ruptured lines have killed thousands of people and cost the industry millions of dollars.    
      
Taken on December 26, 2006 by Akintunde Akinleye
</p>

A man rinses soot from his face at the scene of a gas pipeline explosion near Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos. Nigeria's dilapidated oil pipeline network, built in the late 1970s but poorly maintained, has taken its toll on human lives...more

A man rinses soot from his face at the scene of a gas pipeline explosion near Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos. Nigeria's dilapidated oil pipeline network, built in the late 1970s but poorly maintained, has taken its toll on human lives and the industry over the decade. Vandalism by oil thieves, attacks by militants and frequent explosions when civilians try to scoop up oil leaking from ruptured lines have killed thousands of people and cost the industry millions of dollars. Taken on December 26, 2006 by Akintunde Akinleye

Close
3 / 10
<p>Rescue workers carry fatally injured New York City Fire Department Chaplain, Fether Mychal Judge, from one of the World Trade Center towers in New York City.     Rescue workers were hailed as heroes after working tirelessly after the Sept. 11 attacks to find any survivors. During the collapse of the twin towers, nearly 400 rescuers were killed as they battled to save people stranded in the World Trade Center. Up to 70,000 people took part in the massive operation at Ground Zero, including police, firefighters and construction workers, some coming voluntarily from other parts of the country. Many worked for months in a toxic cloud of dust and chemicals which has triggered a spate of illnesses, some fatal, among rescue workers.
      
 
Taken on September 11, 2001 by Shannon Stapleton       
</p>

Rescue workers carry fatally injured New York City Fire Department Chaplain, Fether Mychal Judge, from one of the World Trade Center towers in New York City. Rescue workers were hailed as heroes after working tirelessly after the Sept. 11 attacks...more

Rescue workers carry fatally injured New York City Fire Department Chaplain, Fether Mychal Judge, from one of the World Trade Center towers in New York City. Rescue workers were hailed as heroes after working tirelessly after the Sept. 11 attacks to find any survivors. During the collapse of the twin towers, nearly 400 rescuers were killed as they battled to save people stranded in the World Trade Center. Up to 70,000 people took part in the massive operation at Ground Zero, including police, firefighters and construction workers, some coming voluntarily from other parts of the country. Many worked for months in a toxic cloud of dust and chemicals which has triggered a spate of illnesses, some fatal, among rescue workers. Taken on September 11, 2001 by Shannon Stapleton

Close
4 / 10
<p>A woman cries as she cannot find her 4-year-old daughter and husband on top of the ruins of a destroyed school in earthquakee hit Beichuan county.     
 
A massive earthquake in China's southwest in May 2008 killed more than 80,000 people but also revealed the chronic strains in communist China, highlighting the divisions between the rich and the poor, the powerful and the powerless. Survivors made angry claims about corruption, favouritism and delays while accusations of mismanagement behind students' deaths struck a deep chord in China where family-planning restrictions make single children the focus of immense hopes and love. The transformation of anguished parents into fugitives showed a state that can be loath to scrutinise past mistakes.       
 
Taken on May 17, 2008 by Jason Lee.
</p>

A woman cries as she cannot find her 4-year-old daughter and husband on top of the ruins of a destroyed school in earthquakee hit Beichuan county. A massive earthquake in China's southwest in May 2008 killed more than 80,000 people but also...more

A woman cries as she cannot find her 4-year-old daughter and husband on top of the ruins of a destroyed school in earthquakee hit Beichuan county. A massive earthquake in China's southwest in May 2008 killed more than 80,000 people but also revealed the chronic strains in communist China, highlighting the divisions between the rich and the poor, the powerful and the powerless. Survivors made angry claims about corruption, favouritism and delays while accusations of mismanagement behind students' deaths struck a deep chord in China where family-planning restrictions make single children the focus of immense hopes and love. The transformation of anguished parents into fugitives showed a state that can be loath to scrutinise past mistakes. Taken on May 17, 2008 by Jason Lee.

Close
5 / 10
<p>An ultra-Orthodox Jewish protester tries to push a bulldozer at a demonstration at Israeli Kibbutz.   
 
It was a picture that captured the clash of cultures as an ultra-orthodox Jewish protester tried to stop a bulldozer at a demonstation at an Israeli Kibbutz.
     
 
Taken on April 14, 2005 by Gil Cohen Magen
</p>

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish protester tries to push a bulldozer at a demonstration at Israeli Kibbutz. It was a picture that captured the clash of cultures as an ultra-orthodox Jewish protester tried to stop a bulldozer at a demonstation at an...more

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish protester tries to push a bulldozer at a demonstration at Israeli Kibbutz. It was a picture that captured the clash of cultures as an ultra-orthodox Jewish protester tried to stop a bulldozer at a demonstation at an Israeli Kibbutz. Taken on April 14, 2005 by Gil Cohen Magen

Close
6 / 10
<p>Ukrainian woman places carnations into shields of anti-riot policemen standing outside the presidential office in Kiev.    
    
Ukraine, whose economy is one of the worst-performing in Europe, will hold its first presidential election in six years on January 17 next year which Russia is hoping will improve ties between the two nations. Russian-Ukrainian relations have been fraught since pro-Western President Viktor Yushchenko was swept to power in the ex-Soviet state on a wave of anti-Russian feeling during the Orange Revolution in  2004. Apart from the mass voting fraud, the run-up to that poll was marked by violence including the murder of a prominent journalist, the suicide of an interior minister, and the poisoning of Yushchenko which has left his face badly scarred.
    
Taken on November 24, 2004 by Vasily Fedosenko.     
</p>

Ukrainian woman places carnations into shields of anti-riot policemen standing outside the presidential office in Kiev. Ukraine, whose economy is one of the worst-performing in Europe, will hold its first presidential election in six years...more

Ukrainian woman places carnations into shields of anti-riot policemen standing outside the presidential office in Kiev. Ukraine, whose economy is one of the worst-performing in Europe, will hold its first presidential election in six years on January 17 next year which Russia is hoping will improve ties between the two nations. Russian-Ukrainian relations have been fraught since pro-Western President Viktor Yushchenko was swept to power in the ex-Soviet state on a wave of anti-Russian feeling during the Orange Revolution in 2004. Apart from the mass voting fraud, the run-up to that poll was marked by violence including the murder of a prominent journalist, the suicide of an interior minister, and the poisoning of Yushchenko which has left his face badly scarred. Taken on November 24, 2004 by Vasily Fedosenko.

Close
7 / 10
<p>G8 leaders return into the Gleneagles Hotel following a family photo.    
 
After decades in charge, the club of rich, industrialized nations groups in the G8 lost sway this decade as a share of the global economic power shifted towards big developing countries. Without China, these small, traditional groups were no longer able to tackle the world's economic problems, prompting world leaders to decide that the G20, which does includes China, India and other big developing nations, should become the premier forum for managing the world economy.    
 
Taken on July 8, 2005 by Kevin Coombs
</p>

G8 leaders return into the Gleneagles Hotel following a family photo. After decades in charge, the club of rich, industrialized nations groups in the G8 lost sway this decade as a share of the global economic power shifted towards big...more

G8 leaders return into the Gleneagles Hotel following a family photo. After decades in charge, the club of rich, industrialized nations groups in the G8 lost sway this decade as a share of the global economic power shifted towards big developing countries. Without China, these small, traditional groups were no longer able to tackle the world's economic problems, prompting world leaders to decide that the G20, which does includes China, India and other big developing nations, should become the premier forum for managing the world economy. Taken on July 8, 2005 by Kevin Coombs

Close
8 / 10
<p>A British soldier jumps from a burning tank in the southern Iraq city of Basra.   
 
For nearly five years Britain controlled southern Iraq until it handed over security of Basra province to Iraq in 2007 and formally handed responsibility for running Basra airport to Iraqi authories in 2009. A total of 179 British armed forces personnel or MOD civilians died while serving in the U.S.-led operation in Iraq with Britain holding an inquiry into the reasons for British participation in Iraq.     
 
Taken on September 19, 2005 by Atef Hassan       
</p>

A British soldier jumps from a burning tank in the southern Iraq city of Basra. For nearly five years Britain controlled southern Iraq until it handed over security of Basra province to Iraq in 2007 and formally handed responsibility for running...more

A British soldier jumps from a burning tank in the southern Iraq city of Basra. For nearly five years Britain controlled southern Iraq until it handed over security of Basra province to Iraq in 2007 and formally handed responsibility for running Basra airport to Iraqi authories in 2009. A total of 179 British armed forces personnel or MOD civilians died while serving in the U.S.-led operation in Iraq with Britain holding an inquiry into the reasons for British participation in Iraq. Taken on September 19, 2005 by Atef Hassan

Close
9 / 10
<p>Somali refugees run from the dust at Ifo camp near Dadaab.   
 
Somalis forced to flee war and drought are living in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions in their home country and in nearby countries like Kenya, Ethiopia, and Yemen, with an estimated 1.5 million people uprooted since the start of 2007 and some 3.6 million Somalis in need of international assistance. U.N. agencies have warned that this is an issue that can't be ignored as the country's increasingly desperate people will try to escape abroad without an influx of foreign aid.   
 
Taken on January 8, 2007 by Radu Sigheti.
</p>

Somali refugees run from the dust at Ifo camp near Dadaab. Somalis forced to flee war and drought are living in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions in their home country and in nearby countries like Kenya, Ethiopia, and Yemen, with an estimated...more

Somali refugees run from the dust at Ifo camp near Dadaab. Somalis forced to flee war and drought are living in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions in their home country and in nearby countries like Kenya, Ethiopia, and Yemen, with an estimated 1.5 million people uprooted since the start of 2007 and some 3.6 million Somalis in need of international assistance. U.N. agencies have warned that this is an issue that can't be ignored as the country's increasingly desperate people will try to escape abroad without an influx of foreign aid. Taken on January 8, 2007 by Radu Sigheti.

Close
10 / 10

Next Slideshows

Photo technique: Layers

Photographic layers are created whenever the action occurs in multiple parts of the frame, rather than just the foreground. A look at photos with these complex...

Dec 09 2009

Climate spotlight: Living with pollution

Living alongside pollution is a fact of life for many around the world.

Dec 09 2009

Pictures of the Decade Part 4

The fourth series in a selection of 100 Reuters pictures that have defined the decade.

Dec 09 2009

Climate spotlight: Vanishing ice

Glaciers around the world impacted by climate change.

Dec 09 2009

MORE IN PICTURES

Ousted ambassador testifies in Trump impeachment hearings

Ousted ambassador testifies in Trump impeachment hearings

A second day of televised impeachment hearings opened in the House of Representatives with the spotlight on Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine branded "bad news" by President Donald Trump before he fired her.

Sudan looks to pyramids to attract tourism

Sudan looks to pyramids to attract tourism

Sudan boasts more more - though smaller - pyramids than Egypt, and after conflicts and crises, the country's new civilian transition government is seeking to grow the number of visitors to the historic sites.

Protesters barricade Hong Kong university campuses

Protesters barricade Hong Kong university campuses

Hong Kong protesters have turned several universities into fortresses, stockpiled with petrol bombs and bows and arrows, amid some of the worst violence in the former British colony in decades.

Venice under water

Venice under water

Venice declared a state of emergency on Wednesday after "apocalyptic" floods swept through the lagoon city, flooding its historic basilica and inundating squares and centuries-old buildings.

Latin Grammy Awards red carpet

Latin Grammy Awards red carpet

Style from the arrivals carpet at the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards.

Raging street protests grip Chile

Raging street protests grip Chile

Protests over a hike in metro fares have spun out of control, leading to riots, arson and looting that have left more than 20 people dead in Chile.

Iraq's young protesters vow to never give up

Iraq's young protesters vow to never give up

Wearing surgical masks, motorcycle helmets and clothes stained with blood and grime, young Iraqis have been out in their thousands since mass anti-government protests kicked off on Oct. 1 in the capital and then quickly spread to the country's south.

Tenuous truce in Gaza after two days of hostilities

Tenuous truce in Gaza after two days of hostilities

Palestinian militant group Islamic Jihad and Israel declared a halt to hostilities across the Gaza Strip border but a lasting ceasefire appeared tenuous as they differed on terms, after Israel triggered the exchange of fire by killing the Iranian-backed faction's top Gaza commander in an air strike.

Photos of the week

Photos of the week

Our top photos from the past week.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast