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Pictures | Fri May 18, 2018 | 1:00pm EDT

Puerto Rico braces for hurricane season

Jose Alvarez, 60, uses a head lamp while walking in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jose Alvarez, 60, uses a head lamp while walking in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jose Alvarez, 60, uses a head lamp while walking in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Wilson Reyes, 44, uses a solar lamp while walking in the dark in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. The U.S. federal agency tasked with restoring electricity to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit the Caribbean last year is leaving the island though thousands still have no power heading into the next hurricane season starting next month.


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Wilson Reyes, 44, uses a solar lamp while walking in the dark in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. The U.S. federal agency tasked with restoring electricity to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit the Caribbean last year is leaving the island though thousands...more

Wilson Reyes, 44, uses a solar lamp while walking in the dark in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. The U.S. federal agency tasked with restoring electricity to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit the Caribbean last year is leaving the island though thousands still have no power heading into the next hurricane season starting next month. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A horse eats from the hand of a young man while being illuminated by a flashlight in Adjuntas. Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico last September, leaving 1.5 million homes and businesses in the dark. Both the island's power utility and the Trump Administration's Federal Emergency Management Agency were criticized for a slow response.

 REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A horse eats from the hand of a young man while being illuminated by a flashlight in Adjuntas. Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico last September, leaving 1.5 million homes and businesses in the dark. Both the island's power utility and the Trump...more

A horse eats from the hand of a young man while being illuminated by a flashlight in Adjuntas. Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico last September, leaving 1.5 million homes and businesses in the dark. Both the island's power utility and the Trump Administration's Federal Emergency Management Agency were criticized for a slow response. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Cancer patient Israel Gonzalez, 84, poses for a photograph with the light of a solar lamp at his home in Utuado. Most power has been restored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers but the electricity grid remains unreliable, and suffered an island-wide blackout last month.


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Cancer patient Israel Gonzalez, 84, poses for a photograph with the light of a solar lamp at his home in Utuado. Most power has been restored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers but the electricity grid remains unreliable, and suffered an island-wide...more

Cancer patient Israel Gonzalez, 84, poses for a photograph with the light of a solar lamp at his home in Utuado. Most power has been restored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers but the electricity grid remains unreliable, and suffered an island-wide blackout last month. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood carry an electricity pole in Utuado. About 22,000 customers are still without electricity, most in remote areas, according to the new head of the island's power utility, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority.

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood carry an electricity pole in Utuado. About 22,000 customers are still without electricity, most in remote areas, according to the new head of the island's power utility, the Puerto Rico Electric Power...more

Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood carry an electricity pole in Utuado. About 22,000 customers are still without electricity, most in remote areas, according to the new head of the island's power utility, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood work on an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood work on an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood work on an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Alexis Massol sits in a cinema that uses solar energy in Adjuntas. The writing on the screen reads "Bankruptcy."
REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Alexis Massol sits in a cinema that uses solar energy in Adjuntas. The writing on the screen reads "Bankruptcy." REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Alexis Massol sits in a cinema that uses solar energy in Adjuntas. The writing on the screen reads "Bankruptcy." REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Contractors of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers install an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Contractors of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers install an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Contractors of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers install an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Residents of La Central neighbourhood wash clothes in the river in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Central neighbourhood wash clothes in the river in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Central neighbourhood wash clothes in the river in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Jannet Rodriguez, 40, stands on the porch of her house with solar lamps attached to the railings in Adjuntas. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jannet Rodriguez, 40, stands on the porch of her house with solar lamps attached to the railings in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jannet Rodriguez, 40, stands on the porch of her house with solar lamps attached to the railings in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A house illuminated with the help of a generator in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A house illuminated with the help of a generator in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A house illuminated with the help of a generator in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Food is seen on a kitchen counter in a house without electricity in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Food is seen on a kitchen counter in a house without electricity in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Food is seen on a kitchen counter in a house without electricity in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Jannet Rodriguez (R), 44, uses a solar lamp while talking to her daughter Keimiliz in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jannet Rodriguez (R), 44, uses a solar lamp while talking to her daughter Keimiliz in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jannet Rodriguez (R), 44, uses a solar lamp while talking to her daughter Keimiliz in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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The license plate of a jeep of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) reads "Puerto Rico, Island of Enchantment" in Utuado. 

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

The license plate of a jeep of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) reads "Puerto Rico, Island of Enchantment" in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

The license plate of a jeep of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) reads "Puerto Rico, Island of Enchantment" in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A cat sits next to a generator in a house without electricity in Adjuntas. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A cat sits next to a generator in a house without electricity in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A cat sits next to a generator in a house without electricity in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A resident of La Chorrera neighbourhood tries to fix an electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A resident of La Chorrera neighbourhood tries to fix an electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A resident of La Chorrera neighbourhood tries to fix an electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A cat sits next to electrical cables connected to a generator in Utuado. 

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A cat sits next to electrical cables connected to a generator in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A cat sits next to electrical cables connected to a generator in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A house illuminated with the help of a generator in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A house illuminated with the help of a generator in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A house illuminated with the help of a generator in Adjuntas. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Gladys Lugo, 67, sits in a wheelchair as a solar lamp illuminates the entrance of her home in Jayuya. 

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Gladys Lugo, 67, sits in a wheelchair as a solar lamp illuminates the entrance of her home in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Gladys Lugo, 67, sits in a wheelchair as a solar lamp illuminates the entrance of her home in Jayuya. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A contractor of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers carries cables in Utuado. 

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A contractor of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers carries cables in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A contractor of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers carries cables in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood are seen through a destroyed house while they work on an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood are seen through a destroyed house while they work on an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood are seen through a destroyed house while they work on an electricity pole in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid in Utuado. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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