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Pictures | Mon Sep 10, 2012 | 5:35pm EDT

Rare Amazon encounter

<p>An aerial view shows the Yanomami Indian community of Irotatheri, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, during a government trip for journalists, September 7, 2012. The Venezuela government and indigenous groups are disputing whether an alleged massacre of Amazon villagers took place after the government said it found no evidence of an attack. A group representing the Yanomami tribe last week said that Brazilian gold miners had crossed the border and attacked a village from a helicopter. Venezuelan officials said over the weekend that flyovers of the area led them to believe that the allegations were false. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

An aerial view shows the Yanomami Indian community of Irotatheri, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, during a government trip for journalists, September 7, 2012. The Venezuela government and...more

An aerial view shows the Yanomami Indian community of Irotatheri, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, during a government trip for journalists, September 7, 2012. The Venezuela government and indigenous groups are disputing whether an alleged massacre of Amazon villagers took place after the government said it found no evidence of an attack. A group representing the Yanomami tribe last week said that Brazilian gold miners had crossed the border and attacked a village from a helicopter. Venezuelan officials said over the weekend that flyovers of the area led them to believe that the allegations were false. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian runs in the jungle at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian runs in the jungle at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins more

A Yanomami Indian runs in the jungle at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian woman carries a child at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian woman carries a child at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins...more

A Yanomami Indian woman carries a child at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>Yanomami Indians dance at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

Yanomami Indians dance at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Yanomami Indians dance at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>Yanomami Indians chat at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

Yanomami Indians chat at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Yanomami Indians chat at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian watches a dance as he chews leaves at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian watches a dance as he chews leaves at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos...more

A Yanomami Indian watches a dance as he chews leaves at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>Yanomami Indians at the community of Irotatheri, are pictured during a government trip for journalists, as they wait to perform a dance to welcome an investigative commission, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

Yanomami Indians at the community of Irotatheri, are pictured during a government trip for journalists, as they wait to perform a dance to welcome an investigative commission, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from...more

Yanomami Indians at the community of Irotatheri, are pictured during a government trip for journalists, as they wait to perform a dance to welcome an investigative commission, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian woman stands at her shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian woman stands at her shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia...more

A Yanomami Indian woman stands at her shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian boy removes chiggers, the larvae of mites, from a fellow Yanomami at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian boy removes chiggers, the larvae of mites, from a fellow Yanomami at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border,...more

A Yanomami Indian boy removes chiggers, the larvae of mites, from a fellow Yanomami at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian looks on before performing a dance during a government trip for journalists at the community of Irotatheri in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012.  REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian looks on before performing a dance during a government trip for journalists at the community of Irotatheri in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos...more

A Yanomami Indian looks on before performing a dance during a government trip for journalists at the community of Irotatheri in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian walks as she carries a baby at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012.  REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian walks as she carries a baby at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia...more

A Yanomami Indian walks as she carries a baby at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian dances at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian dances at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A Yanomami Indian dances at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian baths a child at a river at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012.  REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian baths a child at a river at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia...more

A Yanomami Indian baths a child at a river at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian boy looks on at a hammock at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 8, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian boy looks on at a hammock at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 8, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia...more

A Yanomami Indian boy looks on at a hammock at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 8, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>Yanomami Indians sleep on hammocks at their shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

Yanomami Indians sleep on hammocks at their shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos...more

Yanomami Indians sleep on hammocks at their shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>Yanomami Indians sit around a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

Yanomami Indians sit around a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins more

Yanomami Indians sit around a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>Yanomami Indians sit around a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

Yanomami Indians sit around a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins more

Yanomami Indians sit around a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian sits next to a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian sits next to a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins more

A Yanomami Indian sits next to a fire at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian woman sleeps on a hammock at her shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian woman sleeps on a hammock at her shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012....more

A Yanomami Indian woman sleeps on a hammock at her shack at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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<p>A Yanomami Indian shack is pictured at night during a government trip for journalists at the community of Irotatheri, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins </p>

A Yanomami Indian shack is pictured at night during a government trip for journalists at the community of Irotatheri, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia...more

A Yanomami Indian shack is pictured at night during a government trip for journalists at the community of Irotatheri, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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