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Pictures | Thu Feb 26, 2015 | 9:35am EST

Reunions and ransoms in Myanmar

Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, enjoys an internet reunion with her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, January 31, 2015. Her face is smeared with a traditional Burmese cosmetic paste called thanaka. "Whatever happens, whatever anyone does, don't get into any fights," Sohidar warns him. "Don't worry, don't worry," he replies. REUTERS/Minzayar

Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, enjoys an internet reunion with her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, January 31, 2015. Her face is smeared with a traditional Burmese cosmetic paste called thanaka. "Whatever happens,...more

Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, enjoys an internet reunion with her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, January 31, 2015. Her face is smeared with a traditional Burmese cosmetic paste called thanaka. "Whatever happens, whatever anyone does, don't get into any fights," Sohidar warns him. "Don't worry, don't worry," he replies. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Norbanu, a 60-year-old Rohingya, speaks with her daughter's boyfriend, who is now in Indonesia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 14, 2015. He has broken his promise to send for her, Norbanu tells him, so she will now marry off her daughter to another man. REUTERS/Minzayar

Norbanu, a 60-year-old Rohingya, speaks with her daughter's boyfriend, who is now in Indonesia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar...more

Norbanu, a 60-year-old Rohingya, speaks with her daughter's boyfriend, who is now in Indonesia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 14, 2015. He has broken his promise to send for her, Norbanu tells him, so she will now marry off her daughter to another man. REUTERS/Minzayar
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A man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. Operators of the huts charge customers 10 cents a minute to talk to relatives who have left Rakhine State by boat to seek work overseas. Some arrive safely, while others are held hostage for ransom by human traffickers at jungle camps in Thailand or Malaysia. REUTERS/Minzayar

A man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. Operators of the huts charge customers 10 cents a minute to talk to relatives who have left Rakhine State by boat to seek work overseas. Some arrive safely,...more

A man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. Operators of the huts charge customers 10 cents a minute to talk to relatives who have left Rakhine State by boat to seek work overseas. Some arrive safely, while others are held hostage for ransom by human traffickers at jungle camps in Thailand or Malaysia. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Abdul Salam, a 47-year-old Rohingya, asks a friend in Malaysia for advice from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 29, 2015. His friend Muhammad Rafiq, a Rohingya in Thae Chaung village, has a son held by traffickers, and they are raising the money to pay the ransom. Abdul Salam's question is: How can he be sure the trafficker, once paid, will let the boy go?  REUTERS/Minzayar

Abdul Salam, a 47-year-old Rohingya, asks a friend in Malaysia for advice from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 29, 2015. His friend Muhammad Rafiq, a Rohingya in Thae Chaung village, has a son held by traffickers, and they are raising...more

Abdul Salam, a 47-year-old Rohingya, asks a friend in Malaysia for advice from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 29, 2015. His friend Muhammad Rafiq, a Rohingya in Thae Chaung village, has a son held by traffickers, and they are raising the money to pay the ransom. Abdul Salam's question is: How can he be sure the trafficker, once paid, will let the boy go? REUTERS/Minzayar
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Rohimar, a 30-year-old Rohingya, reacts as she talks to her brother Abdul Rahman, 25, who left Myanmar eight months ago and is currently in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. Rohimar is upset. She says she sold everything to fund her brother's journey overseas, but he hasn't sent her any money. "I feel alone and abandoned," she say. "He only gives money to his wife who is still living here. We are left totally helpless even though I always pray for him."  REUTERS/Minzayar

Rohimar, a 30-year-old Rohingya, reacts as she talks to her brother Abdul Rahman, 25, who left Myanmar eight months ago and is currently in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. Rohimar is upset. She says she sold...more

Rohimar, a 30-year-old Rohingya, reacts as she talks to her brother Abdul Rahman, 25, who left Myanmar eight months ago and is currently in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. Rohimar is upset. She says she sold everything to fund her brother's journey overseas, but he hasn't sent her any money. "I feel alone and abandoned," she say. "He only gives money to his wife who is still living here. We are left totally helpless even though I always pray for him." REUTERS/Minzayar
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Noor Zirarmad, 67, speaks to his son in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. The son of Noor Zirarmad has sent him the equivalent of about $100. Zirarmad, a Rohingya Muslim, is confirming receipt of the money, which will pay for medical treatment for his sick wife. REUTERS/Minzayar

Noor Zirarmad, 67, speaks to his son in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. The son of Noor Zirarmad has sent him the equivalent of about $100. Zirarmad, a Rohingya Muslim, is confirming receipt of the money,...more

Noor Zirarmad, 67, speaks to his son in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. The son of Noor Zirarmad has sent him the equivalent of about $100. Zirarmad, a Rohingya Muslim, is confirming receipt of the money, which will pay for medical treatment for his sick wife. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Rohingya people, some crying, video-chat with a big group of their relatives in Bangladesh, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

Rohingya people, some crying, video-chat with a big group of their relatives in Bangladesh, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

Rohingya people, some crying, video-chat with a big group of their relatives in Bangladesh, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Muhammad Eliyas, a 23-year-old Rohingya, speaks to his 17-year-old brother who is in the hands of traffickers, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. He and their mother have brought the equivalent of $1,500 to the internet hut, whose owner will transfer it to the trafficker via a middleman in a nearby village. Relatives entrust Kyaw Thein with bricks of kyat which he delivers to a Rohingya middleman in a nearby village. He says he doesn't charge for this service or deal directly with the traffickers. "They trust me," he says, "but I don't trust them."  REUTERS/Minzayar

Muhammad Eliyas, a 23-year-old Rohingya, speaks to his 17-year-old brother who is in the hands of traffickers, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. He and their mother have brought the equivalent of $1,500 to the internet...more

Muhammad Eliyas, a 23-year-old Rohingya, speaks to his 17-year-old brother who is in the hands of traffickers, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. He and their mother have brought the equivalent of $1,500 to the internet hut, whose owner will transfer it to the trafficker via a middleman in a nearby village. Relatives entrust Kyaw Thein with bricks of kyat which he delivers to a Rohingya middleman in a nearby village. He says he doesn't charge for this service or deal directly with the traffickers. "They trust me," he says, "but I don't trust them." REUTERS/Minzayar
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A motorcycle passes as a man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

A motorcycle passes as a man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

A motorcycle passes as a man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Fatima holds her grandchild as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 14, 2015. Fatima, a 56-year-old Rohingya, blesses her son's choice of bride via the internet. He sits in a cafe in the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur, where he works as a cleaner. "Of course you must marry her, if her skin is fair," Fatima tells him. He promises to introduce his sweetheart in a later call. "You are the tree and I am the branch," says Fatima's son respectfully. "I will only marry if you agree."  REUTERS/Minzayar

Fatima holds her grandchild as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 14, 2015. Fatima, a 56-year-old Rohingya, blesses her son's choice of bride via the internet. He sits in a cafe in the Malaysian capital Kuala...more

Fatima holds her grandchild as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 14, 2015. Fatima, a 56-year-old Rohingya, blesses her son's choice of bride via the internet. He sits in a cafe in the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur, where he works as a cleaner. "Of course you must marry her, if her skin is fair," Fatima tells him. He promises to introduce his sweetheart in a later call. "You are the tree and I am the branch," says Fatima's son respectfully. "I will only marry if you agree." REUTERS/Minzayar
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Abdul Kadar cries as he talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. Abdul Kadar's 14-year-old daughter left home one morning and never came back. She is now in a camp in Thailand or Malaysia. Traffickers are demanding a $1,500 ransom that Abdul Kadar, a Rohingya rickshaw driver earning about $1.50 a day, cannot pay. Abdul Kadar told them to find a man who wants to marry his daughter, then ask him to pay the ransom. He knows he is effectively giving the traffickers permission to sell his daughter. "All I have are worries," he says. "I can't do anything."  REUTERS/Minzayar

Abdul Kadar cries as he talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. Abdul Kadar's 14-year-old daughter left home one morning and never came back. She is now in a camp in Thailand or Malaysia. Traffickers are...more

Abdul Kadar cries as he talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. Abdul Kadar's 14-year-old daughter left home one morning and never came back. She is now in a camp in Thailand or Malaysia. Traffickers are demanding a $1,500 ransom that Abdul Kadar, a Rohingya rickshaw driver earning about $1.50 a day, cannot pay. Abdul Kadar told them to find a man who wants to marry his daughter, then ask him to pay the ransom. He knows he is effectively giving the traffickers permission to sell his daughter. "All I have are worries," he says. "I can't do anything." REUTERS/Minzayar
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Sanura, 18, tries to talk to her husband from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. He is still in the hands of smugglers, and when the smuggler picks up the phone he says, "I'm driving, we will talk later."  REUTERS/Minzayar

Sanura, 18, tries to talk to her husband from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. He is still in the hands of smugglers, and when the smuggler picks up the phone he says, "I'm driving, we will talk later." REUTERS/Minzayar

Sanura, 18, tries to talk to her husband from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. He is still in the hands of smugglers, and when the smuggler picks up the phone he says, "I'm driving, we will talk later." REUTERS/Minzayar
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Jeweliyar, a 35-year-old Rohingya, counts out about $600 worth of Myanmar currency while her mother Toryubar, 65, watches on in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. The money is part of a $1,500 ransom demanded for Toryubar's 23-year-old daughter, who is held by traffickers in Malaysia. Like many relatives, she entrusts the money to the internet hut's operator, Kyaw Thein, who delivers it to a traffickers' middleman. REUTERS/Minzayar

Jeweliyar, a 35-year-old Rohingya, counts out about $600 worth of Myanmar currency while her mother Toryubar, 65, watches on in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. The money is part of a $1,500 ransom demanded for Toryubar's...more

Jeweliyar, a 35-year-old Rohingya, counts out about $600 worth of Myanmar currency while her mother Toryubar, 65, watches on in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. The money is part of a $1,500 ransom demanded for Toryubar's 23-year-old daughter, who is held by traffickers in Malaysia. Like many relatives, she entrusts the money to the internet hut's operator, Kyaw Thein, who delivers it to a traffickers' middleman. REUTERS/Minzayar
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A boy peers into an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015.  REUTERS/Minzayar

A boy peers into an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

A boy peers into an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Ma Saw Khin talks to her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. Ma Saw Khin, 35, is a Kaman Muslim from the Rakhine town of Kyaukphyu, where Buddhists drove out the Muslim population in 2012. She jokes with her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia, but the call has a serious purpose: they promise to send Ma Saw Khin money to buy food and medicine for their sick mother.  REUTERS/Minzayar

Ma Saw Khin talks to her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. Ma Saw Khin, 35, is a Kaman Muslim from the Rakhine town of Kyaukphyu, where Buddhists drove out the Muslim population in...more

Ma Saw Khin talks to her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. Ma Saw Khin, 35, is a Kaman Muslim from the Rakhine town of Kyaukphyu, where Buddhists drove out the Muslim population in 2012. She jokes with her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia, but the call has a serious purpose: they promise to send Ma Saw Khin money to buy food and medicine for their sick mother. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Muhammad Ali (L) and his cousin wait for the call to get through to Muhammad's son in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. The call never went through.  REUTERS/Minzayar

Muhammad Ali (L) and his cousin wait for the call to get through to Muhammad's son in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. The call never went through. REUTERS/Minzayar

Muhammad Ali (L) and his cousin wait for the call to get through to Muhammad's son in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. The call never went through. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Salima, a Rohingya woman, talks to her husband, son and daughter, who are all being held by traffickers abroad, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. She has to pay $600 and they discuss how to raise it. Later, she shouts at the trafficker himself. REUTERS/Minzayar

Salima, a Rohingya woman, talks to her husband, son and daughter, who are all being held by traffickers abroad, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. She has to pay $600 and they discuss how to raise it. Later, she shouts at...more

Salima, a Rohingya woman, talks to her husband, son and daughter, who are all being held by traffickers abroad, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. She has to pay $600 and they discuss how to raise it. Later, she shouts at the trafficker himself. REUTERS/Minzayar
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People gather in and around an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015.  REUTERS/Minzayar

People gather in and around an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

People gather in and around an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Noor, a 28-year-old Rohingya woman, jokes with her husband Muhammad Rafiq, 35, while their son Noor Kaidar listens at an internet hut in Thae Chaung village,  January 30, 2015. Rafiq has been working in Malaysia for 10 months; this is the fifth time they've spoken during that period. "Don't send us more money," Noor urges him. "Make sure you have enough to buy clothes for yourself first. "Can I kiss you?" asks Rafiq. Noor laughs, "There are other people here. Think about what you say."  REUTERS/Minzayar

Noor, a 28-year-old Rohingya woman, jokes with her husband Muhammad Rafiq, 35, while their son Noor Kaidar listens at an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. Rafiq has been working in Malaysia for 10 months; this is the fifth time...more

Noor, a 28-year-old Rohingya woman, jokes with her husband Muhammad Rafiq, 35, while their son Noor Kaidar listens at an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 30, 2015. Rafiq has been working in Malaysia for 10 months; this is the fifth time they've spoken during that period. "Don't send us more money," Noor urges him. "Make sure you have enough to buy clothes for yourself first. "Can I kiss you?" asks Rafiq. Noor laughs, "There are other people here. Think about what you say." REUTERS/Minzayar
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Fatima looks at a computer screen in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Fatima, a 30-year-old Rohingya, is trying to reach her 13-year-old son, who is being held a trafficking camp in Malaysia or Thailand, but his captors won't let her talk to him until she has paid the $1,500 ransom. "I don't even have a hut to sleep in," she says. "Where can I get that much money?"  REUTERS/Minzayar

Fatima looks at a computer screen in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Fatima, a 30-year-old Rohingya, is trying to...more

Fatima looks at a computer screen in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Fatima, a 30-year-old Rohingya, is trying to reach her 13-year-old son, who is being held a trafficking camp in Malaysia or Thailand, but his captors won't let her talk to him until she has paid the $1,500 ransom. "I don't even have a hut to sleep in," she says. "Where can I get that much money?" REUTERS/Minzayar
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Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 29, 2015. Rahana, a 32-year-old Rohingya, has already sent $1,100 to the trafficker who is holding her 12-year-old son ransom at a camp along the Thailand-Malaysia border. The trafficker wants another $300 before he will release the boy. "Let me speak to my son," Rahana tells the trafficker. A few seconds pass, then a small voice says, "Mum?" Rahana's eyes fill with tears. "I will send the money," she assures her son. "Then they will let you go." REUTERS/Minzayar

Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 29, 2015. Rahana, a 32-year-old Rohingya, has already sent $1,100 to the trafficker who is holding her 12-year-old son ransom at a camp along the...more

Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 29, 2015. Rahana, a 32-year-old Rohingya, has already sent $1,100 to the trafficker who is holding her 12-year-old son ransom at a camp along the Thailand-Malaysia border. The trafficker wants another $300 before he will release the boy. "Let me speak to my son," Rahana tells the trafficker. A few seconds pass, then a small voice says, "Mum?" Rahana's eyes fill with tears. "I will send the money," she assures her son. "Then they will let you go." REUTERS/Minzayar
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Robizar cries as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Robizar's 18-year-old son left Myanmar by boat 10 months ago and now lives with his father in Malaysia. Robizar, a 32-year-old Rohingya, misses him badly. "Son, I can't tell you how it feels to hear your voice," she says.  REUTERS/Minzayar

Robizar cries as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Robizar's 18-year-old son left Myanmar...more

Robizar cries as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Robizar's 18-year-old son left Myanmar by boat 10 months ago and now lives with his father in Malaysia. Robizar, a 32-year-old Rohingya, misses him badly. "Son, I can't tell you how it feels to hear your voice," she says. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, listens as her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, talks to their eldest child Noor Kamal, 9, at an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. The boy asks if he can have a bike so that he can cycle to school. "When you get to fifth grade, you can get a bike," says his father.  REUTERS/Minzayar

Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, listens as her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, talks to their eldest child Noor Kamal, 9, at an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. The boy asks if he can have a bike so...more

Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, listens as her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, talks to their eldest child Noor Kamal, 9, at an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, January 31, 2015. The boy asks if he can have a bike so that he can cycle to school. "When you get to fifth grade, you can get a bike," says his father. REUTERS/Minzayar
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People use a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015.  REUTERS/Minzayar

People use a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

People use a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar
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