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Pictures | Mon Jan 25, 2016 | 1:10pm EST

Rumsfeld: From politician to gamer

Donald Rumsfeld testifies during a house committee hearing in Washington, August 1, 2007. The former U.S. secretary of defense has released an iOS video game app based on a version of solitaire played by Winston Churchill. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Donald Rumsfeld testifies during a house committee hearing in Washington, August 1, 2007. The former U.S. secretary of defense has released an iOS video game app based on a version of solitaire played by Winston Churchill. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Donald Rumsfeld testifies during a house committee hearing in Washington, August 1, 2007. The former U.S. secretary of defense has released an iOS video game app based on a version of solitaire played by Winston Churchill. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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Donald Rumsfeld (front R) sits on his C-17 aircraft on the ground at Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia April 29, 2003. In a blog post on Medium.com, Rumsfeld wrote that he has spent the past two years developing the app of the Solitaire variant. The game, which he calls "an incredibly devilish version of solitaire," uses two decks instead of one, 10 rows of cards instead of seven, and an extra pile of "the Devil's Six" cards that players must sort as well from Ace to King. REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazzalf

Donald Rumsfeld (front R) sits on his C-17 aircraft on the ground at Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia April 29, 2003. In a blog post on Medium.com, Rumsfeld wrote that he has spent the past two years developing the app of the Solitaire variant....more

Donald Rumsfeld (front R) sits on his C-17 aircraft on the ground at Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia April 29, 2003. In a blog post on Medium.com, Rumsfeld wrote that he has spent the past two years developing the app of the Solitaire variant. The game, which he calls "an incredibly devilish version of solitaire," uses two decks instead of one, 10 rows of cards instead of seven, and an extra pile of "the Devil's Six" cards that players must sort as well from Ace to King. REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazzalf
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Commander of the South Korean contingent Major General Hwang Eui Don watches Donald Rumsfeld speak by phone with South Korea's Minister of Defense from a camp in Arbil, Iraq, October 10, 2004. The card game, Rumsfeld says, "can frustrate even the most skilled player because a single move can make or break an entire game." REUTERS/Sasa Kralj

Commander of the South Korean contingent Major General Hwang Eui Don watches Donald Rumsfeld speak by phone with South Korea's Minister of Defense from a camp in Arbil, Iraq, October 10, 2004. The card game, Rumsfeld says, "can frustrate even the...more

Commander of the South Korean contingent Major General Hwang Eui Don watches Donald Rumsfeld speak by phone with South Korea's Minister of Defense from a camp in Arbil, Iraq, October 10, 2004. The card game, Rumsfeld says, "can frustrate even the most skilled player because a single move can make or break an entire game." REUTERS/Sasa Kralj
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Donald Rumsfeld (L), U.S. President George W. Bush (C) and vice president Dick Cheney attend the Armed Forces Full Honor Review at the Pentagon in Washington December 15, 2006. Rumsfeld learned the game in 1973, he writes, from Andre de Staercke, a former protege of Winston Churchill, while the two men were working as ambassador and diplomat, respectively, at NATO headquarters in Brussels. REUTERS/Larry Downing

Donald Rumsfeld (L), U.S. President George W. Bush (C) and vice president Dick Cheney attend the Armed Forces Full Honor Review at the Pentagon in Washington December 15, 2006. Rumsfeld learned the game in 1973, he writes, from Andre de Staercke, a...more

Donald Rumsfeld (L), U.S. President George W. Bush (C) and vice president Dick Cheney attend the Armed Forces Full Honor Review at the Pentagon in Washington December 15, 2006. Rumsfeld learned the game in 1973, he writes, from Andre de Staercke, a former protege of Winston Churchill, while the two men were working as ambassador and diplomat, respectively, at NATO headquarters in Brussels. REUTERS/Larry Downing
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Donald Rumsfeld signs a Baghdad road sign at the request of a U.S. soldier at Baghdad's international airport, Iraq, April 30, 2003. Rumsfeld writes that up until a few years ago, there were probably a dozen or so people in the world who knew how to play this game -- mostly people he had taught to play. "I knew I wouldn't be around forever," he wrote. "There was every chance the game Churchill so enjoyed could be lost to the ages." REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazza

Donald Rumsfeld signs a Baghdad road sign at the request of a U.S. soldier at Baghdad's international airport, Iraq, April 30, 2003. Rumsfeld writes that up until a few years ago, there were probably a dozen or so people in the world who knew how to...more

Donald Rumsfeld signs a Baghdad road sign at the request of a U.S. soldier at Baghdad's international airport, Iraq, April 30, 2003. Rumsfeld writes that up until a few years ago, there were probably a dozen or so people in the world who knew how to play this game -- mostly people he had taught to play. "I knew I wouldn't be around forever," he wrote. "There was every chance the game Churchill so enjoyed could be lost to the ages." REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazza
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George W. Bush receives a note from Donald Rumsfeld given to him from Condoleezza Rice informing the president "Iraq is sovereign" during the opening working session of the NATO Summit in Istanbul, Turkey, June 28, 2004. The president returned the paper to Dr. Rice after writing, "Let freedom reign." After Rumsfeld was approached to turn the game into an app, he contacted Winston Churchill's family in January 2014 to ask for approval to use the family name. They approved -- Randolph Churchill, Winston's great-grandson, called it "a marvelous way to bring this back to life." REUTERS/Larry Downing

George W. Bush receives a note from Donald Rumsfeld given to him from Condoleezza Rice informing the president "Iraq is sovereign" during the opening working session of the NATO Summit in Istanbul, Turkey, June 28, 2004. The president returned the...more

George W. Bush receives a note from Donald Rumsfeld given to him from Condoleezza Rice informing the president "Iraq is sovereign" during the opening working session of the NATO Summit in Istanbul, Turkey, June 28, 2004. The president returned the paper to Dr. Rice after writing, "Let freedom reign." After Rumsfeld was approached to turn the game into an app, he contacted Winston Churchill's family in January 2014 to ask for approval to use the family name. They approved -- Randolph Churchill, Winston's great-grandson, called it "a marvelous way to bring this back to life." REUTERS/Larry Downing
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Donald Rumsfeld departs after speaking at a town hall meeting at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia September 22, 2006. The Churchill Solitaire app is free and is currently available in the Apple App Store, with a 4.5/5 rating. Profits from the in-game purchases in the app will go to charity, Rumsfeld says. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Donald Rumsfeld departs after speaking at a town hall meeting at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia September 22, 2006. The Churchill Solitaire app is free and is currently available in the Apple App Store, with a 4.5/5 rating. Profits from the...more

Donald Rumsfeld departs after speaking at a town hall meeting at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia September 22, 2006. The Churchill Solitaire app is free and is currently available in the Apple App Store, with a 4.5/5 rating. Profits from the in-game purchases in the app will go to charity, Rumsfeld says. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Donald Rumsfeld talks to Lt. General Ricardo Sanchez (R), head of the coalition forces in Iraq, on a helicopter in Baghdad, Iraq May, 13, 2004. "I've found it helps improve concentration and sharpens instincts," Rumsfeld writes. "To succeed in Churchill Solitaire, you have to envision a variety of scenarios and think a good many moves ahead." REUTERS/David Hume Kennerly/Pool

Donald Rumsfeld talks to Lt. General Ricardo Sanchez (R), head of the coalition forces in Iraq, on a helicopter in Baghdad, Iraq May, 13, 2004. "I've found it helps improve concentration and sharpens instincts," Rumsfeld writes. "To succeed in...more

Donald Rumsfeld talks to Lt. General Ricardo Sanchez (R), head of the coalition forces in Iraq, on a helicopter in Baghdad, Iraq May, 13, 2004. "I've found it helps improve concentration and sharpens instincts," Rumsfeld writes. "To succeed in Churchill Solitaire, you have to envision a variety of scenarios and think a good many moves ahead." REUTERS/David Hume Kennerly/Pool
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Lisa Dolan puts her hand on the shoulder of Donald Rumsfeld at a ground-breaking ceremony for a 9/11 memorial at the Pentagon in Washington, June 15, 2006. REUTERS/Jim Young

Lisa Dolan puts her hand on the shoulder of Donald Rumsfeld at a ground-breaking ceremony for a 9/11 memorial at the Pentagon in Washington, June 15, 2006. REUTERS/Jim Young

Lisa Dolan puts her hand on the shoulder of Donald Rumsfeld at a ground-breaking ceremony for a 9/11 memorial at the Pentagon in Washington, June 15, 2006. REUTERS/Jim Young
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Donald Rumsfeld and China's Defense Minister Cao Gangchuan attend a welcoming ceremony at the Chinese Defense Ministry in Beijing, China October 19, 2005. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Donald Rumsfeld and China's Defense Minister Cao Gangchuan attend a welcoming ceremony at the Chinese Defense Ministry in Beijing, China October 19, 2005. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Donald Rumsfeld and China's Defense Minister Cao Gangchuan attend a welcoming ceremony at the Chinese Defense Ministry in Beijing, China October 19, 2005. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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Donald Rumsfeld tours a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan, December 21, 2005. REUTERS/Jim Young

Donald Rumsfeld tours a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan, December 21, 2005. REUTERS/Jim Young

Donald Rumsfeld tours a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan, December 21, 2005. REUTERS/Jim Young
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George W. Bush escorts Donald Rumsfeld from the Oval Office of the White House after announcing Rumsfeld's replacement in Washington November 8, 2006. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

George W. Bush escorts Donald Rumsfeld from the Oval Office of the White House after announcing Rumsfeld's replacement in Washington November 8, 2006. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

George W. Bush escorts Donald Rumsfeld from the Oval Office of the White House after announcing Rumsfeld's replacement in Washington November 8, 2006. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Donald Rumsfeld puts on a bullet-proof flack jacket upon his departure from Saddam Hussein's Abu Gharyb Palace in Baghdad, Iraq, April 30, 2003. REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazza

Donald Rumsfeld puts on a bullet-proof flack jacket upon his departure from Saddam Hussein's Abu Gharyb Palace in Baghdad, Iraq, April 30, 2003. REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazza

Donald Rumsfeld puts on a bullet-proof flack jacket upon his departure from Saddam Hussein's Abu Gharyb Palace in Baghdad, Iraq, April 30, 2003. REUTERS/Pool/Luke Frazza
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Donald Rumsfeld awards a Purple Heart to Army Sgt. Chris Scott of the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, as he recuperates in a medical facility at Mosul Airfield, Iraq, on December 24, 2004. REUTERS/U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. James M. Bowman/Handout

Donald Rumsfeld awards a Purple Heart to Army Sgt. Chris Scott of the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, as he recuperates in a medical facility at Mosul Airfield, Iraq, on December 24, 2004. REUTERS/U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. James M....more

Donald Rumsfeld awards a Purple Heart to Army Sgt. Chris Scott of the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, as he recuperates in a medical facility at Mosul Airfield, Iraq, on December 24, 2004. REUTERS/U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. James M. Bowman/Handout
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Donald Rumsfeld greets U.S. military personnel during a visit to the Abu Ghraib prison on the outskirts of Baghdad, Iraq May 13, 2004. REUTERS/Jim MacMillan

Donald Rumsfeld greets U.S. military personnel during a visit to the Abu Ghraib prison on the outskirts of Baghdad, Iraq May 13, 2004. REUTERS/Jim MacMillan

Donald Rumsfeld greets U.S. military personnel during a visit to the Abu Ghraib prison on the outskirts of Baghdad, Iraq May 13, 2004. REUTERS/Jim MacMillan
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Donald Rumsfeld and George W. Bush attend the Armed Forces Full Honor Review at the Pentagon in Washington December 15, 2006.  REUTERS/Larry Downing

Donald Rumsfeld and George W. Bush attend the Armed Forces Full Honor Review at the Pentagon in Washington December 15, 2006. REUTERS/Larry Downing

Donald Rumsfeld and George W. Bush attend the Armed Forces Full Honor Review at the Pentagon in Washington December 15, 2006. REUTERS/Larry Downing
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