Edition:
United States
Pictures | Mon Mar 12, 2012 | 4:30pm EDT

Slovak Batman

<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. Kohari, who is 26 years old, lives alone in an abandoned building without water, heat or electricity. For local residents he became known as the hero in a Batman's costume. While he has not fought crime yet, he does believe in justice and wants to help the police. In the mean time, Kohari, who is poor, does what he can to help the residents to make their daily life easier. In return, some of these residents give him food. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. Kohari, who is 26 years old, lives alone in an abandoned building without water, heat or...more

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. Kohari, who is 26 years old, lives alone in an abandoned building without water, heat or electricity. For local residents he became known as the hero in a Batman's costume. While he has not fought crime yet, he does believe in justice and wants to help the police. In the mean time, Kohari, who is poor, does what he can to help the residents to make their daily life easier. In return, some of these residents give him food. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
1 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, looks out from the window of his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, looks out from the window of his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, looks out from the window of his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
2 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
3 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, laughs with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, laughs with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, laughs with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
4 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, leaves home from second-story window in town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, leaves home from second-story window in town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, leaves home from second-story window in town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
5 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
6 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
7 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
8 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with a portrait of himself in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with a portrait of himself in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with a portrait of himself in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
9 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, reveals the Batman symbol on his chest in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, reveals the Batman symbol on his chest in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, reveals the Batman symbol on his chest in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
10 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, shows his hand-made gadgets in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, shows his hand-made gadgets in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, shows his hand-made gadgets in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
11 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with neighbour Jana Kocisova (2nd R), her family and two other children (L) in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with neighbour Jana Kocisova (2nd R), her family and two other children (L) in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with neighbour Jana Kocisova (2nd R), her family and two other children (L) in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
12 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, claps hands with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, claps hands with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, claps hands with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
13 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, patrols around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, patrols around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, patrols around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
14 / 15
<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up the area around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up the area around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up the area around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Close
15 / 15

Next Slideshows

An American homeless family

Two mothers and seven children without a place to call home.

Mar 09 2012

Celebrating Holi

The festival of colors marks the the beginning of Hindu spring.

Mar 09 2012

Celebrating Purim

A look at the Jewish costume holiday of Purim.

Mar 08 2012

Coming to America

Enrollment is dropping at some rural schools, but officials have an improbable plan to save their schools -- by turning them into magnets for wealthy foreign...

Mar 08 2012

MORE IN PICTURES

CMA Awards red carpet

CMA Awards red carpet

Style from the red carpet at the CMA Awards in Nashville.

2020 candidates sign up for New Hampshire primary

2020 candidates sign up for New Hampshire primary

The candidates for the 2020 U.S. presidential election sign their paperwork to compete in the New Hampshire primary.

Venice under water

Venice under water

Venice declared a state of emergency on Wednesday after "apocalyptic" floods swept through the lagoon city, flooding its historic basilica and inundating squares and centuries-old buildings.

Iraq protests ramp up after relative calm

Iraq protests ramp up after relative calm

At least four protesters were killed and more than 65 wounded on Thursday in clashes with Iraqi security forces who were trying to push them back to their main camp in central Baghdad.

Raging street protests grip Chile

Raging street protests grip Chile

Protests over a hike in metro fares have spun out of control, leading to riots, arson and looting that have left at least 23 dead in Chile.

Best of CMA Awards

Best of CMA Awards

Highlights from the 53rd annual CMA Awards in Nashville.

Iraq's young protesters vow to never give up

Iraq's young protesters vow to never give up

Wearing surgical masks, motorcycle helmets and clothes stained with blood and grime, young Iraqis have been out in their thousands since mass anti-government protests kicked off on Oct. 1 in the capital and then quickly spread to the country's south.

Protesters and police battle at Hong Kong university campuses

Protesters and police battle at Hong Kong university campuses

Thousands of students barricaded themselves inside campuses at several universities, preparing stockpiles of food, bricks, petrol bombs and other makeshift weapons as they hunkered down for possible clashes with police.

Rare photographs capture Rolling Stones' humble beginnings

Rare photographs capture Rolling Stones' humble beginnings

A series of rarely seen black-and-white photographs dating back to the Rolling Stones' first concert tour in 1963 will go on display in east London this month.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast