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Pictures | Mon Mar 12, 2012 | 4:30pm EDT

Slovak Batman

<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. Kohari, who is 26 years old, lives alone in an abandoned building without water, heat or electricity. For local residents he became known as the hero in a Batman's costume. While he has not fought crime yet, he does believe in justice and wants to help the police. In the mean time, Kohari, who is poor, does what he can to help the residents to make their daily life easier. In return, some of these residents give him food. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. Kohari, who is 26 years old, lives alone in an abandoned building without water, heat or...more

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. Kohari, who is 26 years old, lives alone in an abandoned building without water, heat or electricity. For local residents he became known as the hero in a Batman's costume. While he has not fought crime yet, he does believe in justice and wants to help the police. In the mean time, Kohari, who is poor, does what he can to help the residents to make their daily life easier. In return, some of these residents give him food. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, looks out from the window of his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, looks out from the window of his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, looks out from the window of his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, laughs with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, laughs with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, laughs with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, leaves home from second-story window in town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, leaves home from second-story window in town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, leaves home from second-story window in town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, puts on his costume in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with a portrait of himself in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with a portrait of himself in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with a portrait of himself in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, reveals the Batman symbol on his chest in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, reveals the Batman symbol on his chest in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, reveals the Batman symbol on his chest in his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, shows his hand-made gadgets in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, shows his hand-made gadgets in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, shows his hand-made gadgets in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with neighbour Jana Kocisova (2nd R), her family and two other children (L) in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with neighbour Jana Kocisova (2nd R), her family and two other children (L) in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, poses with neighbour Jana Kocisova (2nd R), her family and two other children (L) in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, claps hands with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, claps hands with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari (R), known as the Slovak Batman, claps hands with neighbour Jana Kocisova in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, patrols around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, patrols around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, patrols around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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<p>Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up the area around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012.  REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa </p>

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up the area around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

Zoltan Kohari, known as the Slovak Batman, cleans up the area around his home in the town of Dunajska Streda, some 34 miles (55 km) south of Bratislava March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Radovan Stoklasa

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