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Pictures | Thu Dec 6, 2012 | 10:26am EST

Soccer: Goal technology debuts in Club World Cup opener

Goal keeper Tamati Williams of New Zealand's Auckland City catches the ball as a unit (green case) of a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef, which will be used at the Club World Cup soccer tournament, is seen during their Club World Cup soccer match againt Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Goal keeper Tamati Williams of New Zealand's Auckland City catches the ball as a unit (green case) of a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef, which will be used at the Club World Cup soccer tournament, is seen during...more

Goal keeper Tamati Williams of New Zealand's Auckland City catches the ball as a unit (green case) of a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef, which will be used at the Club World Cup soccer tournament, is seen during their Club World Cup soccer match againt Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
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Mihael Mikic of Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima watched the ball during their Club World Cup soccer match against New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Mihael Mikic of Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima watched the ball during their Club World Cup soccer match against New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Mihael Mikic of Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima watched the ball during their Club World Cup soccer match against New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
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Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) talks with other referees at Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) talks with other referees at Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) talks with other referees at Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
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Goal keeper Tamati Williams (R) of New Zealand's Auckland City watches the ball, scored by Toshihiro Aoyama of Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima, during their Club World Cup soccer match in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA is using a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef, which will be used first time in an official match at the Club World Cup soccer tournament. The system, which uses a microchip implanted in a ball and low magnetic waves around the goal, will detect if the ball has crossed the line and send an immediate message to the wrist watch worn by the referee. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Goal keeper Tamati Williams (R) of New Zealand's Auckland City watches the ball, scored by Toshihiro Aoyama of Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima, during their Club World Cup soccer match in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA is using a...more

Goal keeper Tamati Williams (R) of New Zealand's Auckland City watches the ball, scored by Toshihiro Aoyama of Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima, during their Club World Cup soccer match in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA is using a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef, which will be used first time in an official match at the Club World Cup soccer tournament. The system, which uses a microchip implanted in a ball and low magnetic waves around the goal, will detect if the ball has crossed the line and send an immediate message to the wrist watch worn by the referee. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
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Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) holds the ball at a Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) holds the ball at a Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) holds the ball at a Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
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Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) holds the ball during the Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA used a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef for the first time in an official match at the Club World Cup soccer tournament. The system, which uses a microchip implanted in a ball and low magnetic waves around the goal, will detect if the ball has crossed the line and send an immediate message to the wrist watch worn by the referee. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) holds the ball during the Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA used a goal-line technology system by the...more

Referee Djamel Haimoudi (C) holds the ball during the Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA used a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef for the first time in an official match at the Club World Cup soccer tournament. The system, which uses a microchip implanted in a ball and low magnetic waves around the goal, will detect if the ball has crossed the line and send an immediate message to the wrist watch worn by the referee. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
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Referee Djamel Haimoudi throws a ball at a Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA used a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef for the first time in an official match at the Club World Cup soccer tournament. The system, which uses a microchip implanted in a ball and low magnetic waves around the goal, will detect if the ball has crossed the line and send an immediate message to the wrist watch worn by the referee. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Referee Djamel Haimoudi throws a ball at a Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA used a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected...more

Referee Djamel Haimoudi throws a ball at a Club World Cup soccer match between Japan's Sanfrecce Hiroshima and New Zealand's Auckland City in Yokohama, south of Tokyo December 6, 2012. FIFA used a goal-line technology system by the FIFA-selected provider GoalRef for the first time in an official match at the Club World Cup soccer tournament. The system, which uses a microchip implanted in a ball and low magnetic waves around the goal, will detect if the ball has crossed the line and send an immediate message to the wrist watch worn by the referee. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
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