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Pictures | Wed Jul 11, 2012 | 4:59pm EDT

Special Report: The wonks who sold Washington on South Sudan

John Garang (L) shakes hands with Roger Winter, now an honorary adviser to the South Sudan government and one of the Council's original members, in this undated image taken in Sudan and provided to Reuters by Roger Winter. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. REUTERS/Handout

John Garang (L) shakes hands with Roger Winter, now an honorary adviser to the South Sudan government and one of the Council's original members, in this undated image taken in Sudan and provided to Reuters by Roger Winter. Nationhood has many...more

John Garang (L) shakes hands with Roger Winter, now an honorary adviser to the South Sudan government and one of the Council's original members, in this undated image taken in Sudan and provided to Reuters by Roger Winter. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. REUTERS/Handout
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Ted Dagne poses for a portrait in Nairobi, July 4, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken July 4, 2012. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Ted Dagne poses for a portrait in Nairobi, July 4, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with...more

Ted Dagne poses for a portrait in Nairobi, July 4, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken July 4, 2012. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
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Roger Winter, an honorary adviser to the South Sudan government and one of the Council's original members, sits at his regular window side table at the Otello Restaurant in Washington, June 27, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 27, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Roger Winter, an honorary adviser to the South Sudan government and one of the Council's original members, sits at his regular window side table at the Otello Restaurant in Washington, June 27, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own...more

Roger Winter, an honorary adviser to the South Sudan government and one of the Council's original members, sits at his regular window side table at the Otello Restaurant in Washington, June 27, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 27, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Human-rights activist John Prendergast poses for a photograph in his Washington office, June 29, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Human-rights activist John Prendergast poses for a photograph in his Washington office, June 29, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million...more

Human-rights activist John Prendergast poses for a photograph in his Washington office, June 29, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford

United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese...more

United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford
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John Prendergast (L-R), Eric Reeves, Brian D'Silva, Ted Dagne and Roger Miller pose for a photograph in this undated image provided to Reuters by John Prendergast. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. REUTERS/Nancy Reeves/Handout

John Prendergast (L-R), Eric Reeves, Brian D'Silva, Ted Dagne and Roger Miller pose for a photograph in this undated image provided to Reuters by John Prendergast. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people....more

John Prendergast (L-R), Eric Reeves, Brian D'Silva, Ted Dagne and Roger Miller pose for a photograph in this undated image provided to Reuters by John Prendergast. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. REUTERS/Nancy Reeves/Handout
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United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford

United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese...more

United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford
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Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who...more

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh
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The Otello Restaurant is pictured in Washington, June 27, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 27, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

The Otello Restaurant is pictured in Washington, June 27, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom...more

The Otello Restaurant is pictured in Washington, June 27, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 27, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Human-rights activist John Prendergast poses for a photograph in his Washington office, June 29, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Human-rights activist John Prendergast poses for a photograph in his Washington office, June 29, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million...more

Human-rights activist John Prendergast poses for a photograph in his Washington office, June 29, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford

United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese...more

United Nations Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide Francis Deng poses for a portrait in his office in New York, June 28, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 28, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford
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Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modernday abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who...more

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modernday abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh
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Ted Dagne poses for a portrait in Nairobi, July 4, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken July 4, 2012. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Ted Dagne poses for a portrait in Nairobi, July 4, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with...more

Ted Dagne poses for a portrait in Nairobi, July 4, 2012. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken July 4, 2012. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
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Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who...more

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh
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Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who...more

Smith College Professor and South Sudan expert Eric Reeves is pictured at home in Northampton, Massachusetts June 29, 2012. Nationhood has many midwives. South Sudan is primarily the creation of its own people. It was southern Sudanese leaders who fought for autonomy, and more than two million southern Sudanese who paid for that freedom with their lives. U.S. President George W. Bush, who set out to end Africa's Longest-running civil war, also played a big role, as did modern-day abolitionists, religious groups, human rights organizations and members of the U.S. Congress. But the most persistent outside force in the creation of the world's newest state was the Council, a tightly knit group never numbering more than seven people, which in the era before email, began gathering regularly at Otello, a restaurant near Washington's DuPont Circle. Picture taken June 29, 2012. REUTERS/Matthew Cavanaugh
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