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<p>Thespian, a humanoid robot, communicates with the audience through a user's interface at the Robotic World exhibition at Madatech, the Israel National Museum of Science, in the northern city of Haifa July 8, 2010. REUTERS/Baz Ratner </p>

Thespian, a humanoid robot, communicates with the audience through a user's interface at the Robotic World exhibition at Madatech, the Israel National Museum of Science, in the northern city of Haifa July 8, 2010. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Thespian, a humanoid robot, communicates with the audience through a user's interface at the Robotic World exhibition at Madatech, the Israel National Museum of Science, in the northern city of Haifa July 8, 2010. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

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<p>Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg flies in the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane during its first successful night flight attempt at Payerne airport July 8, 2010. The aircraft took off July 7 at 06:51 am and reached an altitude of 8,700 meters (28,543 feet) by the end of the day. It then slowly descent to 1,500 meters (4,921 feet) and flew during the night on the batteries, charged during the day by 12,000 solar cells, which powered the four electric motors. It landed July 8 at 09.00 am (GMT 2) for a flight time of 26 hours and 9 minutes, setting the longest and highest flight ever made by a solar plane. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse </p>

Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg flies in the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane during its first successful night flight attempt at Payerne airport July 8, 2010. The aircraft took off July 7 at 06:51 am and...more

Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg flies in the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane during its first successful night flight attempt at Payerne airport July 8, 2010. The aircraft took off July 7 at 06:51 am and reached an altitude of 8,700 meters (28,543 feet) by the end of the day. It then slowly descent to 1,500 meters (4,921 feet) and flew during the night on the batteries, charged during the day by 12,000 solar cells, which powered the four electric motors. It landed July 8 at 09.00 am (GMT 2) for a flight time of 26 hours and 9 minutes, setting the longest and highest flight ever made by a solar plane. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

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<p>Bioengineering student Alex Golberg demonstrates a battery powered by a potato in a lab at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem July 6, 2010. The electric battery based on boiled potatoes could provide a cheap source of electricity in the developing world, according to the technology transfer company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun </p>

Bioengineering student Alex Golberg demonstrates a battery powered by a potato in a lab at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem July 6, 2010. The electric battery based on boiled potatoes could provide a cheap source of electricity in the developing...more

Bioengineering student Alex Golberg demonstrates a battery powered by a potato in a lab at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem July 6, 2010. The electric battery based on boiled potatoes could provide a cheap source of electricity in the developing world, according to the technology transfer company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

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<p>Customers check Apple laptops at the new Apple Store at Pudong Lujiazui in Shanghai July 10, 2010. REUTERS/Aly Song </p>

Customers check Apple laptops at the new Apple Store at Pudong Lujiazui in Shanghai July 10, 2010. REUTERS/Aly Song

Customers check Apple laptops at the new Apple Store at Pudong Lujiazui in Shanghai July 10, 2010. REUTERS/Aly Song

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<p>Double amputee, Christian Kandlbauer from Austria, with a regular artificial limb and a prototype of a mind-controlled artificial limb on his left side, is interviewed by Reuters in Vienna July 6, 2010. Kandlbauer, 22, who lost both of his arms in an accident in 2005, controls the seven joints of the prosthetic arm in real time through the mental movements of his phantom arm. The innovative prosthesis is based on TMR ( targeted muscle reinnervation), a process that uses residual nerves in the residual limb for the control of prosthesis functions. The mind-controlled prosthetic arm allows the user to complete movements in the joints the way they were executed by the natural arm prior to amputation. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader </p>

Double amputee, Christian Kandlbauer from Austria, with a regular artificial limb and a prototype of a mind-controlled artificial limb on his left side, is interviewed by Reuters in Vienna July 6, 2010. Kandlbauer, 22, who lost both of his arms in an...more

Double amputee, Christian Kandlbauer from Austria, with a regular artificial limb and a prototype of a mind-controlled artificial limb on his left side, is interviewed by Reuters in Vienna July 6, 2010. Kandlbauer, 22, who lost both of his arms in an accident in 2005, controls the seven joints of the prosthetic arm in real time through the mental movements of his phantom arm. The innovative prosthesis is based on TMR ( targeted muscle reinnervation), a process that uses residual nerves in the residual limb for the control of prosthesis functions. The mind-controlled prosthetic arm allows the user to complete movements in the joints the way they were executed by the natural arm prior to amputation. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader

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<p>A picture shot by ESA's Rosetta mission's OSIRIS instrument shows asteroid Lutetia at a distance of 3162 km (1964 miles) its closest approach, July 10, 2010. The images show that Lutetia is heavily cratered, having suffered many impacts during its 4.5 billion years of existence. As Rosetta drew close, a giant bowl-shaped depression stretching across much of the asteroid rotated into view. The images confirm that Lutetia is an elongated body, with its longest side around 130km. REUTERS/ESA 2010 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA </p>

A picture shot by ESA's Rosetta mission's OSIRIS instrument shows asteroid Lutetia at a distance of 3162 km (1964 miles) its closest approach, July 10, 2010. The images show that Lutetia is heavily cratered, having suffered many impacts during its...more

A picture shot by ESA's Rosetta mission's OSIRIS instrument shows asteroid Lutetia at a distance of 3162 km (1964 miles) its closest approach, July 10, 2010. The images show that Lutetia is heavily cratered, having suffered many impacts during its 4.5 billion years of existence. As Rosetta drew close, a giant bowl-shaped depression stretching across much of the asteroid rotated into view. The images confirm that Lutetia is an elongated body, with its longest side around 130km. REUTERS/ESA 2010 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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<p>People holding their cellphones sit on an advertisement of Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S smartphone outside the company's headquarters in Seoul July 7, 2010. REUTERS/Truth Leem </p>

People holding their cellphones sit on an advertisement of Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S smartphone outside the company's headquarters in Seoul July 7, 2010. REUTERS/Truth Leem

People holding their cellphones sit on an advertisement of Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S smartphone outside the company's headquarters in Seoul July 7, 2010. REUTERS/Truth Leem

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<p>GE Healthcare employees test a digital X-ray machine, that they designed, developed and manufactured, on a dummy in Bangalore June 21, 2010. In a sleek glass and chrome building in Bangalore's software hub, the more than 1,000 young researchers and engineers at GE Healthcare could hold the keys to innovations that save lives in India's vast hinterland. GE Healthcare first assembled high-end ultrasound, CT and X-ray machines and adopted an "in country, for country" policy earlier this year at its sprawling John F. Welch Technology Centre in Bangalore, with a staff of 2,200 focused on India.  REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

GE Healthcare employees test a digital X-ray machine, that they designed, developed and manufactured, on a dummy in Bangalore June 21, 2010. In a sleek glass and chrome building in Bangalore's software hub, the more than 1,000 young researchers and...more

GE Healthcare employees test a digital X-ray machine, that they designed, developed and manufactured, on a dummy in Bangalore June 21, 2010. In a sleek glass and chrome building in Bangalore's software hub, the more than 1,000 young researchers and engineers at GE Healthcare could hold the keys to innovations that save lives in India's vast hinterland. GE Healthcare first assembled high-end ultrasound, CT and X-ray machines and adopted an "in country, for country" policy earlier this year at its sprawling John F. Welch Technology Centre in Bangalore, with a staff of 2,200 focused on India. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>A customer looks at an iPhone 4 at the Apple Store 5th Avenue in New York, June 24, 2010. REUTERS/Eric Thayer</p>

A customer looks at an iPhone 4 at the Apple Store 5th Avenue in New York, June 24, 2010. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

A customer looks at an iPhone 4 at the Apple Store 5th Avenue in New York, June 24, 2010. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

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<p>Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg flies the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane at sunrise during the plane's first night flight attempt near Payerne airport July 8, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrice Coffrini/Pool </p>

Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg flies the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane at sunrise during the plane's first night flight attempt near Payerne airport July 8, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrice Coffrini/Pool

Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg flies the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane at sunrise during the plane's first night flight attempt near Payerne airport July 8, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrice Coffrini/Pool

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