Edition:
International
Pictures | Tue Jul 12, 2011 | 8:25am EDT

Tech watch

<p>U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant Greg Sundbeck (L), and Dr. Gregory Parker, Micro Air Vehicle team leader, observe a test flight of a U.S. Air Force drone in the microaviary lab at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, July 11, 2011. The Micro Air Vehicles unit of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson AFB is developing small military drones, with the goal of making them so small that they resemble small birds and insects, including some that will have moving wings. The mission is to develop MAVs that can find, track and target adversaries while operating in complex urban environments. The engineers are using a variety of small helicopters and drones in the lab to develop the programs and software. Testing takes place in a controlled indoor lab where the team flies the MAVs and then gathers data to analyze for further development. REUTERS/Skip Peterson </p>

U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant Greg Sundbeck (L), and Dr. Gregory Parker, Micro Air Vehicle team leader, observe a test flight of a U.S. Air Force drone in the microaviary lab at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, July 11, 2011. The...more

U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant Greg Sundbeck (L), and Dr. Gregory Parker, Micro Air Vehicle team leader, observe a test flight of a U.S. Air Force drone in the microaviary lab at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, July 11, 2011. The Micro Air Vehicles unit of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson AFB is developing small military drones, with the goal of making them so small that they resemble small birds and insects, including some that will have moving wings. The mission is to develop MAVs that can find, track and target adversaries while operating in complex urban environments. The engineers are using a variety of small helicopters and drones in the lab to develop the programs and software. Testing takes place in a controlled indoor lab where the team flies the MAVs and then gathers data to analyze for further development. REUTERS/Skip Peterson

Close
1 / 14
<p>The space shuttle Atlantis STS-135 lifts off from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, July 8, 2011. The 12-day mission to the International Space Station is the last mission in the Space Shuttle program. REUTERS/Pierre Ducharme </p>

The space shuttle Atlantis STS-135 lifts off from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, July 8, 2011. The 12-day mission to the International Space Station is the last mission in the Space Shuttle program....more

The space shuttle Atlantis STS-135 lifts off from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, July 8, 2011. The 12-day mission to the International Space Station is the last mission in the Space Shuttle program. REUTERS/Pierre Ducharme

Close
2 / 14
<p>The space shuttle Atlantis is seen as it separates from the external fuel tank shortly after launch in this handout image from NASA TV July 8, 2011.    REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout </p>

The space shuttle Atlantis is seen as it separates from the external fuel tank shortly after launch in this handout image from NASA TV July 8, 2011. REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout

The space shuttle Atlantis is seen as it separates from the external fuel tank shortly after launch in this handout image from NASA TV July 8, 2011. REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout

Close
3 / 14
<p>Earth's horizon and aft sections of the space shuttle Atlantis and the orbiter's boom sensor system (OBSS) can be seen through a window on the aft flight deck of the shuttle in this photo provided by NASA and taken July 9, 2011.    REUTERS/NASA/Handout  </p>

Earth's horizon and aft sections of the space shuttle Atlantis and the orbiter's boom sensor system (OBSS) can be seen through a window on the aft flight deck of the shuttle in this photo provided by NASA and taken July 9, 2011. ...more

Earth's horizon and aft sections of the space shuttle Atlantis and the orbiter's boom sensor system (OBSS) can be seen through a window on the aft flight deck of the shuttle in this photo provided by NASA and taken July 9, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

Close
4 / 14
<p>A researcher uses a microscope during a photo call at an aseptic room of the FCB-Pharmicell laboratory in Seongnam, near Seoul, June 28, 2011. South Korea all but put stem cell research into the deep freeze after a pre-eminent scientist, Hwang Woo-suk, was found guilty of fraud for his work in the field in 2005. The state Korea Food and Drug Administration's (KFDA) approval for the sale of the Hearticellgram-AMI treatment, developed by FCB-Pharmicell, from July 1 signals an ambitious new push to put research in the field back on the frontline.      REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak </p>

A researcher uses a microscope during a photo call at an aseptic room of the FCB-Pharmicell laboratory in Seongnam, near Seoul, June 28, 2011. South Korea all but put stem cell research into the deep freeze after a pre-eminent scientist, Hwang...more

A researcher uses a microscope during a photo call at an aseptic room of the FCB-Pharmicell laboratory in Seongnam, near Seoul, June 28, 2011. South Korea all but put stem cell research into the deep freeze after a pre-eminent scientist, Hwang Woo-suk, was found guilty of fraud for his work in the field in 2005. The state Korea Food and Drug Administration's (KFDA) approval for the sale of the Hearticellgram-AMI treatment, developed by FCB-Pharmicell, from July 1 signals an ambitious new push to put research in the field back on the frontline. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

Close
5 / 14
<p>President Barack Obama reacts after tweeting at his first ever Twitter Town Hall in the East Room at the White House in Washington, July 6, 2011.          REUTERS/Larry Downing</p>

President Barack Obama reacts after tweeting at his first ever Twitter Town Hall in the East Room at the White House in Washington, July 6, 2011. REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama reacts after tweeting at his first ever Twitter Town Hall in the East Room at the White House in Washington, July 6, 2011. REUTERS/Larry Downing

Close
6 / 14
<p>A worker checks solar panels at a solar power field in Kawasaki, near Tokyo July 6, 2011. Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. (TEPCO) and Kawasaki City are constructing the mega solar power field, consisting some 37,926 solar panels which will produce some 7.4 million kWh in a year. Commercial service will start on August, 2011.   REUTERS/Toru Hanai </p>

A worker checks solar panels at a solar power field in Kawasaki, near Tokyo July 6, 2011. Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. (TEPCO) and Kawasaki City are constructing the mega solar power field, consisting some 37,926 solar panels which will produce...more

A worker checks solar panels at a solar power field in Kawasaki, near Tokyo July 6, 2011. Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. (TEPCO) and Kawasaki City are constructing the mega solar power field, consisting some 37,926 solar panels which will produce some 7.4 million kWh in a year. Commercial service will start on August, 2011. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Close
7 / 14
<p>An employee of Nissan Motor Co monitors real-time power usage data at the company's facilities at the Oppama plant in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo July 2, 2011. With 35 of Japan's 54 nuclear power plants shut, the Japanese government has ordered big companies to cut their peak power consumption by 15 percent from last year this summer, in the first such mandate since the oil crisis of 1974. To meet the target, the auto industry has changed its weekend holidays to Thursdays and Fridays between July and September.   REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao </p>

An employee of Nissan Motor Co monitors real-time power usage data at the company's facilities at the Oppama plant in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo July 2, 2011. With 35 of Japan's 54 nuclear power plants shut, the Japanese government has ordered big...more

An employee of Nissan Motor Co monitors real-time power usage data at the company's facilities at the Oppama plant in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo July 2, 2011. With 35 of Japan's 54 nuclear power plants shut, the Japanese government has ordered big companies to cut their peak power consumption by 15 percent from last year this summer, in the first such mandate since the oil crisis of 1974. To meet the target, the auto industry has changed its weekend holidays to Thursdays and Fridays between July and September. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

Close
8 / 14
<p>A man rides a bicycle next to a light rail tram in Jerusalem June 30, 2011. It's an ambitious project meant to shunt an ancient city into the 21st century, but Jerusalem's light rail is hitting one red light after another. Numerous delays have plagued the project since Israel began building its first light rail system in 2002. Officials said last week they expected the long awaited inauguration set for August to be put off, yet again, by weeks, if not months.  REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun </p>

A man rides a bicycle next to a light rail tram in Jerusalem June 30, 2011. It's an ambitious project meant to shunt an ancient city into the 21st century, but Jerusalem's light rail is hitting one red light after another. Numerous delays have...more

A man rides a bicycle next to a light rail tram in Jerusalem June 30, 2011. It's an ambitious project meant to shunt an ancient city into the 21st century, but Jerusalem's light rail is hitting one red light after another. Numerous delays have plagued the project since Israel began building its first light rail system in 2002. Officials said last week they expected the long awaited inauguration set for August to be put off, yet again, by weeks, if not months. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

Close
9 / 14
<p>Forensic worker Jose Luis Ramirez examines DNA samples to help identify corpses, in the Mexican forensic building in Mexico City, in this picture taken June 14, 2011. Thousands of drug war corpses have exposed the gaps in Mexican forensic science, where teams struggle to identify victims, vital evidence is often overlooked and most murders go unsolved -- a far cry from the United States. REUTERS/Henry Romero </p>

Forensic worker Jose Luis Ramirez examines DNA samples to help identify corpses, in the Mexican forensic building in Mexico City, in this picture taken June 14, 2011. Thousands of drug war corpses have exposed the gaps in Mexican forensic science,...more

Forensic worker Jose Luis Ramirez examines DNA samples to help identify corpses, in the Mexican forensic building in Mexico City, in this picture taken June 14, 2011. Thousands of drug war corpses have exposed the gaps in Mexican forensic science, where teams struggle to identify victims, vital evidence is often overlooked and most murders go unsolved -- a far cry from the United States. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Close
10 / 14
<p>Jason Schein, Assistant Curator of Natural History, New Jersey State Museum, shows a fossil of the belly plate of an ancient sea turtle that was recently discovered at the site where Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara is leading an Archaeological team digging for fossils of 65 million year-old marine creatures, in Sewell, New Jersey, June 29, 2011. The tooth is approximately 12mm long. New Jersey is the birthplace of dinosaur paleontology. But over the years, the numerous silt mines that made for great dinosaur digging were replaced with housing developments and strip malls. Scientists have been digging here for nearly a century, uncovering prehistoric sharks, crocodiles and even saber tooth herring. But the township of Mantua, a community of 15,000 people, has other plans for the site. Township officials would like to see the mine closed and a retail and lower cost housing development built in its place.  REUTERS/Tom Mihalek </p>

Jason Schein, Assistant Curator of Natural History, New Jersey State Museum, shows a fossil of the belly plate of an ancient sea turtle that was recently discovered at the site where Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara is leading an Archaeological team...more

Jason Schein, Assistant Curator of Natural History, New Jersey State Museum, shows a fossil of the belly plate of an ancient sea turtle that was recently discovered at the site where Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara is leading an Archaeological team digging for fossils of 65 million year-old marine creatures, in Sewell, New Jersey, June 29, 2011. The tooth is approximately 12mm long. New Jersey is the birthplace of dinosaur paleontology. But over the years, the numerous silt mines that made for great dinosaur digging were replaced with housing developments and strip malls. Scientists have been digging here for nearly a century, uncovering prehistoric sharks, crocodiles and even saber tooth herring. But the township of Mantua, a community of 15,000 people, has other plans for the site. Township officials would like to see the mine closed and a retail and lower cost housing development built in its place. REUTERS/Tom Mihalek

Close
11 / 14
<p>A woman decorates a photograph of herself on an electronic monitor to simulate Hello Kitty during a press preview for an event entitled "House of Hello Kitty" presented by Swarovski in Tokyo June 29, 2011. A total of nine creations based on a Hello Kitty character will be put up for sale on an internet auction site and the proceeds will be donated for Japan's earthquake relief efforts, according to a spokeswoman of Swarovski Japan.  REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao </p>

A woman decorates a photograph of herself on an electronic monitor to simulate Hello Kitty during a press preview for an event entitled "House of Hello Kitty" presented by Swarovski in Tokyo June 29, 2011. A total of nine creations based on a Hello...more

A woman decorates a photograph of herself on an electronic monitor to simulate Hello Kitty during a press preview for an event entitled "House of Hello Kitty" presented by Swarovski in Tokyo June 29, 2011. A total of nine creations based on a Hello Kitty character will be put up for sale on an internet auction site and the proceeds will be donated for Japan's earthquake relief efforts, according to a spokeswoman of Swarovski Japan. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

Close
12 / 14
<p>Employees of SMBC Nikko Securities Inc. work using only LED desk lights, during daytime at the company office in Tokyo June 30, 2011, a day before a target to cut electricity use by 15 percent in regions affected by Japan's March 11 earthquake and tsunami takes effect. The cuts are aimed at helping avoid power blackouts during the peak summer demand period amid efforts to restore generating capacity lost in the disaster.  REUTERS/Toru Hanai </p>

Employees of SMBC Nikko Securities Inc. work using only LED desk lights, during daytime at the company office in Tokyo June 30, 2011, a day before a target to cut electricity use by 15 percent in regions affected by Japan's March 11 earthquake and...more

Employees of SMBC Nikko Securities Inc. work using only LED desk lights, during daytime at the company office in Tokyo June 30, 2011, a day before a target to cut electricity use by 15 percent in regions affected by Japan's March 11 earthquake and tsunami takes effect. The cuts are aimed at helping avoid power blackouts during the peak summer demand period amid efforts to restore generating capacity lost in the disaster. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Close
13 / 14
<p>A woman uses touchscreen display in the Humboldt Box temporary exhibition venue in Berlin, June 29, 2011. The temporary structure will house various exhibitions and inform visitors about the progress of the Humboldt Forum development project that is to include replicas of the Baroque facade of the Berlin City Palace (Berliner Stadtschloss).  REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A woman uses touchscreen display in the Humboldt Box temporary exhibition venue in Berlin, June 29, 2011. The temporary structure will house various exhibitions and inform visitors about the progress of the Humboldt Forum development project that is...more

A woman uses touchscreen display in the Humboldt Box temporary exhibition venue in Berlin, June 29, 2011. The temporary structure will house various exhibitions and inform visitors about the progress of the Humboldt Forum development project that is to include replicas of the Baroque facade of the Berlin City Palace (Berliner Stadtschloss). REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Close
14 / 14

Next Slideshows

Who got hacked?

Some of the names mentioned in the News of the World revelations.

Jul 19 2011

Inside Libya's rebel army

On the battle lines and the home front with the Libyan rebel movement.

Jul 11 2011

William and Kate in California

Prince William and Princess Catherine visit California on the last leg of their North American tour.

Jul 11 2011

Photos of the week

Our top photos from the past week.

Jul 08 2011

MORE IN PICTURES

World premiere of Marvel Studios' 'Eternals'

World premiere of Marvel Studios' 'Eternals'

Actors Angelina Jolie and Salma Hayek brought Hollywood glamor to the world premiere of Marvel Studios' latest comic book adaptation, "Eternals."

Demonstrations across polarized Chile on protest anniversary

Demonstrations across polarized Chile on protest anniversary

Demonstrations took place across Chile to mark the second anniversary of the start of months of protests against inequality that triggered a social shift.

No end in sight: Stunning images from the month-long eruption of Spain's La Palma volcano

No end in sight: Stunning images from the month-long eruption of Spain's La Palma volcano

There is no immediate end in sight to the volcanic eruption that has caused chaos on the Spanish isle of La Palma since it began about a month ago, says the president of the Canary Islands.

Sumo kids

Sumo kids

Young sumo wrestlers, still in elementary school, compete in the ring during the Junior Olympic Cup All-Japan Elementary School Sumo Championship, a regional tournament in Kawasaki, south of Tokyo.

On the streets of Kabul under Taliban rule

On the streets of Kabul under Taliban rule

Taliban fighters patrol the Afghan capital, as the country's new rulers struggle to keep banks and basic services running after their victory over the Western-backed government in Kabul two months ago.

Foam fight at Scotland's oldest university

Foam fight at Scotland's oldest university

Hundreds of students at the University of St Andrews put down their books and took part in a mass foam fight, a tradition to welcome new students.

The life and death of Gaddafi

The life and death of Gaddafi

Libya marks ten years since the death of longtime ruler Muammar Gaddafi, who died after a nation-wide uprising led to his overthrow and eventual killing.

Britons mourn slain lawmaker David Amess

Britons mourn slain lawmaker David Amess

Veteran lawmaker David Amess was stabbed to death while meeting members of the public in an attack that has heightened concern about politicians' safety.

Italy imposes mandatory COVID health pass for work amid protests

Italy imposes mandatory COVID health pass for work amid protests

Italy made COVID-19 health passes mandatory for all workers in a test case for Europe, with the measure being applied mostly peacefully across the country despite scattered protests.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast