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Pictures | Wed Aug 5, 2020 | 8:18pm EDT

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 75 years ago

Devastation is seen in the vicinity of 'ground zero' after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. August 6 marks 75 years since the United States unleashed the world's first atomic bomb attack on the city of Hiroshima, followed three days later by the second and last on Nagasaki, vaporizing lives, buildings and Japan's capacity for war. 

Department of Defense/Department of the Air Force/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation is seen in the vicinity of 'ground zero' after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. August 6 marks 75 years since the United States unleashed the world's first atomic bomb attack on the city of Hiroshima, followed three days later by...more

Devastation is seen in the vicinity of 'ground zero' after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan. August 6 marks 75 years since the United States unleashed the world's first atomic bomb attack on the city of Hiroshima, followed three days later by the second and last on Nagasaki, vaporizing lives, buildings and Japan's capacity for war. Department of Defense/Department of the Air Force/Handout via REUTERS
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A 21-year-old soldier who was exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima lies on a cot with purple subcutaneous haemorrhage spots visible on his body at the Ujina Branch of the Hiroshima First Army Hospital in Hiroshima prefecture, Japan, September 3, 1945. Gonichi Kimura/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum/Handout via Reuters

A 21-year-old soldier who was exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima lies on a cot with purple subcutaneous haemorrhage spots visible on his body at the Ujina Branch of the Hiroshima First Army Hospital in Hiroshima prefecture, Japan, September...more

A 21-year-old soldier who was exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima lies on a cot with purple subcutaneous haemorrhage spots visible on his body at the Ujina Branch of the Hiroshima First Army Hospital in Hiroshima prefecture, Japan, September 3, 1945. Gonichi Kimura/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum/Handout via Reuters
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Rubble caused by the atomic bomb blast is seen in Hiroshima, Japan in September 1945. At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, U.S. B-29 warplane Enola Gay dropped a bomb nicknamed "Little Boy" and obliterated the southwestern city of Hiroshima, killing 140,000 of an estimated population of 350,000, with thousands more dying later of injuries and radiation-related illness.

U.S. Navy/Lieutenant Wayne Miller/Handout via REUTERS

Rubble caused by the atomic bomb blast is seen in Hiroshima, Japan in September 1945. At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, U.S. B-29 warplane Enola Gay dropped a bomb nicknamed "Little Boy" and obliterated the southwestern city of Hiroshima, killing...more

Rubble caused by the atomic bomb blast is seen in Hiroshima, Japan in September 1945. At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, U.S. B-29 warplane Enola Gay dropped a bomb nicknamed "Little Boy" and obliterated the southwestern city of Hiroshima, killing 140,000 of an estimated population of 350,000, with thousands more dying later of injuries and radiation-related illness. U.S. Navy/Lieutenant Wayne Miller/Handout via REUTERS
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A woman being treated shows her wounds caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. On August 9, the United States dropped another bomb, dubbed "Fat Man", about 261 miles to the south over Nagasaki, instantly killing more than 75,000 people beneath a mushroom cloud which grew as high as 30,000 feet. Japan surrendered six days later, ending World War Two.

Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

A woman being treated shows her wounds caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. On August 9, the United States dropped another bomb, dubbed "Fat Man", about 261 miles to the south over Nagasaki, instantly killing more than 75,000...more

A woman being treated shows her wounds caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. On August 9, the United States dropped another bomb, dubbed "Fat Man", about 261 miles to the south over Nagasaki, instantly killing more than 75,000 people beneath a mushroom cloud which grew as high as 30,000 feet. Japan surrendered six days later, ending World War Two. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS
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Destroyed houses and buildings are seen after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, August 7, 1945, in this photo taken by Mitsugi Kishida at 1,600 feet from the hypocenter. Mitsugi Kishida/Teppei Kishida/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum/Handout via Reuters

Destroyed houses and buildings are seen after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, August 7, 1945, in this photo taken by Mitsugi Kishida at 1,600 feet from the hypocenter. Mitsugi Kishida/Teppei Kishida/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum/Handout via...more

Destroyed houses and buildings are seen after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, August 7, 1945, in this photo taken by Mitsugi Kishida at 1,600 feet from the hypocenter. Mitsugi Kishida/Teppei Kishida/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum/Handout via Reuters
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A man is treated for wounds caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

A man is treated for wounds caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

A man is treated for wounds caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS
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Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS
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A victim shows scarring caused by the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. U.S. Army/Handout via REUTERS

A victim shows scarring caused by the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. U.S. Army/Handout via REUTERS

A victim shows scarring caused by the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. U.S. Army/Handout via REUTERS
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A bridge 4,400 feet east of the detonation center of the atomic bomb blast is seen in Hiroshima. U.S. Army/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS

A bridge 4,400 feet east of the detonation center of the atomic bomb blast is seen in Hiroshima. U.S. Army/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS

A bridge 4,400 feet east of the detonation center of the atomic bomb blast is seen in Hiroshima. U.S. Army/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS
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A general view of the city of Hiroshima shows damage wrought by the atomic bomb in March 1946, six months after the bomb was dropped. REUTERS

A general view of the city of Hiroshima shows damage wrought by the atomic bomb in March 1946, six months after the bomb was dropped. REUTERS

A general view of the city of Hiroshima shows damage wrought by the atomic bomb in March 1946, six months after the bomb was dropped. REUTERS
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Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS
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A Japanese soldier walks through the leveled city of Hiroshima, Japan in September 1945. Lieutenant Wayne Miller, USNR/Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS

A Japanese soldier walks through the leveled city of Hiroshima, Japan in September 1945. Lieutenant Wayne Miller, USNR/Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS

A Japanese soldier walks through the leveled city of Hiroshima, Japan in September 1945. Lieutenant Wayne Miller, USNR/Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS
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The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, currently called the Atomic Bomb Dome or A-Bomb Dome, is seen in Hiroshima, Japan, before (top) and after (bottom) the bombing. The top image is undated and the bottom image was taken by Shigeo Hayashi between October 1 and 10, 1945. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (top) and Shigeo Hayashi/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (bottom)/Handout via Reuters

The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, currently called the Atomic Bomb Dome or A-Bomb Dome, is seen in Hiroshima, Japan, before (top) and after (bottom) the bombing. The top image is undated and the bottom image was taken by Shigeo...more

The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, currently called the Atomic Bomb Dome or A-Bomb Dome, is seen in Hiroshima, Japan, before (top) and after (bottom) the bombing. The top image is undated and the bottom image was taken by Shigeo Hayashi between October 1 and 10, 1945. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (top) and Shigeo Hayashi/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (bottom)/Handout via Reuters
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The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, currently called the Atomic Bomb Dome or A-Bomb Dome, is seen from Aioi Bridge in Hiroshima before (top) and after (bottom) the bombing. The top image is undated and the bottom image was taken by Shigeo Hayashi between October 1 and 10, 1945. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (top) and Shigeo Hayashi/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (bottom)/Handout via REUTERS

The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, currently called the Atomic Bomb Dome or A-Bomb Dome, is seen from Aioi Bridge in Hiroshima before (top) and after (bottom) the bombing. The top image is undated and the bottom image was taken by...more

The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, currently called the Atomic Bomb Dome or A-Bomb Dome, is seen from Aioi Bridge in Hiroshima before (top) and after (bottom) the bombing. The top image is undated and the bottom image was taken by Shigeo Hayashi between October 1 and 10, 1945. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (top) and Shigeo Hayashi/Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum (bottom)/Handout via REUTERS
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Aerial pictures of Hiroshima show the extent of devastation on the city, in an image taken April 1945 (top) before the bombing and after, in August 1945. The National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

Aerial pictures of Hiroshima show the extent of devastation on the city, in an image taken April 1945 (top) before the bombing and after, in August 1945. The National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

Aerial pictures of Hiroshima show the extent of devastation on the city, in an image taken April 1945 (top) before the bombing and after, in August 1945. The National Archives/Handout via REUTERS
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Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS
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Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS
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Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

Devastation caused by an atomic bomb is seen in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS
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A tricycle and helmet are displayed at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, Japan, June 1, 2016. U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Elizabeth Baker/Handout via REUTERS

A tricycle and helmet are displayed at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, Japan, June 1, 2016. U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Elizabeth Baker/Handout via REUTERS

A tricycle and helmet are displayed at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, Japan, June 1, 2016. U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Elizabeth Baker/Handout via REUTERS
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People walk past the devastation caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

People walk past the devastation caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS

People walk past the devastation caused by an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan March 17, 1948. Department of Energy/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Handout via REUTERS
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U.S. troops arrive a month after an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan in September 1945. Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS

U.S. troops arrive a month after an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan in September 1945. Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS

U.S. troops arrive a month after an atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan in September 1945. Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS
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People walk along a road cleared of debris caused by an atomic bomb in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

People walk along a road cleared of debris caused by an atomic bomb in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS

People walk along a road cleared of debris caused by an atomic bomb in Hiroshima, Japan. War Department/U.S. National Archives/Handout via REUTERS
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A cyclist rides near a trolley on streets cleared of debris from the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. U.S. Navy/PhoM3/C George Almarez/Handout via REUTERS

A cyclist rides near a trolley on streets cleared of debris from the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. U.S. Navy/PhoM3/C George Almarez/Handout via REUTERS

A cyclist rides near a trolley on streets cleared of debris from the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. U.S. Navy/PhoM3/C George Almarez/Handout via REUTERS
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Japanese representatives Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, attend the surrender ceremonies on board the U.S. Navy battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan September 2, 1945. U.S. Army Signal Corps/U.S. National Archives

Japanese representatives Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, attend the surrender ceremonies on board the U.S. Navy battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan September 2, 1945. U.S. Army...more

Japanese representatives Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, attend the surrender ceremonies on board the U.S. Navy battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan September 2, 1945. U.S. Army Signal Corps/U.S. National Archives
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The crew of the U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 bomber Enola Gay commanded by Colonel Paul Tibbets, Jr. (top row C), which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, pose in 1946. U.S. Army Air Forces/Handout via REUTERS

The crew of the U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 bomber Enola Gay commanded by Colonel Paul Tibbets, Jr. (top row C), which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, pose in 1946. U.S. Army Air Forces/Handout via REUTERS

The crew of the U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 bomber Enola Gay commanded by Colonel Paul Tibbets, Jr. (top row C), which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, pose in 1946. U.S. Army Air Forces/Handout via REUTERS
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A "Little Boy" atomic bomb, the kind detonated over Hiroshima. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS

A "Little Boy" atomic bomb, the kind detonated over Hiroshima. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS

A "Little Boy" atomic bomb, the kind detonated over Hiroshima. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Naval History and Heritage Command/Handout via REUTERS
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Smoke billows 20,000 feet (6,100 metres) after an atomic bomb codenamed "Little Boy" exploded after being dropped by a U.S. Army Air Force B-29 bomber named "Enola Gay" over Hiroshima, Japan August 6, 1945. U.S. Army Air Forces/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS

Smoke billows 20,000 feet (6,100 metres) after an atomic bomb codenamed "Little Boy" exploded after being dropped by a U.S. Army Air Force B-29 bomber named "Enola Gay" over Hiroshima, Japan August 6, 1945. U.S. Army Air Forces/Library of...more

Smoke billows 20,000 feet (6,100 metres) after an atomic bomb codenamed "Little Boy" exploded after being dropped by a U.S. Army Air Force B-29 bomber named "Enola Gay" over Hiroshima, Japan August 6, 1945. U.S. Army Air Forces/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS
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A "Fat Man" atomic bomb type, the kind detonated over Nagasaki. War Department/Office of the Chief of Engineers/Manhattan Engineer District/Handout via REUTERS

A "Fat Man" atomic bomb type, the kind detonated over Nagasaki. War Department/Office of the Chief of Engineers/Manhattan Engineer District/Handout via REUTERS

A "Fat Man" atomic bomb type, the kind detonated over Nagasaki. War Department/Office of the Chief of Engineers/Manhattan Engineer District/Handout via REUTERS
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A mushroom cloud rises after an atomic bomb codenamed "Fat Man" exploded after being dropped by a U.S. Army Air Force B-29 bomber over Nagasaki, Japan August 9, 1945. U.S. Army Air Forces/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS

A mushroom cloud rises after an atomic bomb codenamed "Fat Man" exploded after being dropped by a U.S. Army Air Force B-29 bomber over Nagasaki, Japan August 9, 1945. U.S. Army Air Forces/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS

A mushroom cloud rises after an atomic bomb codenamed "Fat Man" exploded after being dropped by a U.S. Army Air Force B-29 bomber over Nagasaki, Japan August 9, 1945. U.S. Army Air Forces/Library of Congress/Handout via REUTERS
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