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Pictures | Fri Jul 10, 2015 | 9:25pm EDT

The families of Srebrenica

A Muslim woman cries near the coffin of her relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. The bodies of the 136 recently identified victims of the Srebrenica massacre will be buried on July 11, the anniversary of the massacre when Bosnian Serb forces slaughtered 8,000 Muslim men and boys and buried them in mass graves in Europe's worst massacre since World War Two. 

REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A Muslim woman cries near the coffin of her relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. The bodies of the 136 recently identified victims of the...more

A Muslim woman cries near the coffin of her relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. The bodies of the 136 recently identified victims of the Srebrenica massacre will be buried on July 11, the anniversary of the massacre when Bosnian Serb forces slaughtered 8,000 Muslim men and boys and buried them in mass graves in Europe's worst massacre since World War Two. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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A girl looks at coffins of her relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A girl looks at coffins of her relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A girl looks at coffins of her relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Muslims cry near the coffin of their relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015.  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Muslims cry near the coffin of their relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Muslims cry near the coffin of their relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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A woman cries near a truck carrying 136 coffins of newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, in front of the presidential building in Sarajevo, July 9, 2015.REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A woman cries near a truck carrying 136 coffins of newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, in front of the presidential building in Sarajevo, July 9, 2015.REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A woman cries near a truck carrying 136 coffins of newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, in front of the presidential building in Sarajevo, July 9, 2015.REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Bosnian Muslims carry a coffin of their relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. 
REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Bosnian Muslims carry a coffin of their relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Bosnian Muslims carry a coffin of their relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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A family prays near the coffins of their relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Centre in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A family prays near the coffins of their relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Centre in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A family prays near the coffins of their relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Centre in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Men carry a coffin containing the body of a newly identified victim of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 9, 2015.  REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov

Men carry a coffin containing the body of a newly identified victim of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov

Men carry a coffin containing the body of a newly identified victim of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
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A Muslim cries near the coffin of his relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. 
REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A Muslim cries near the coffin of his relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A Muslim cries near the coffin of his relative among the 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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A woman searches for her relative's name on the coffins of newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 9, 2015.  REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov

A woman searches for her relative's name on the coffins of newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov

A woman searches for her relative's name on the coffins of newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
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A woman cries near coffin of her relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Centre in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015.  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A woman cries near coffin of her relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Centre in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

A woman cries near coffin of her relatives who were victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, at the Memorial Centre in Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina July 10, 2015. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Hajra Catic poses under pictures of victims of the genocide in Tuzla, June 11, 2015. Catic is among several thousand of women who still search for the remains of their closest relatives 20 years after the Srebrenica massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and boys. With the help of Edmin Jakubovic who was the last person to see her son injured on the ground, Catic has been constantly searching for her son in the woods.  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Hajra Catic poses under pictures of victims of the genocide in Tuzla, June 11, 2015. Catic is among several thousand of women who still search for the remains of their closest relatives 20 years after the Srebrenica massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and...more

Hajra Catic poses under pictures of victims of the genocide in Tuzla, June 11, 2015. Catic is among several thousand of women who still search for the remains of their closest relatives 20 years after the Srebrenica massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and boys. With the help of Edmin Jakubovic who was the last person to see her son injured on the ground, Catic has been constantly searching for her son in the woods. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Hajra Catic and Edmin Jakubovic search for the remains of her son where Edmin had last seen him wounded on the ground in Bokcin Potok near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, June 23, 2015. Six months ago, she found a skull and a jaw, but the DNA results are still not available. She fears that if she doesn't find his remains, it will be as he had never existed. All that is left of her son is his picture.

 REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Hajra Catic and Edmin Jakubovic search for the remains of her son where Edmin had last seen him wounded on the ground in Bokcin Potok near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, June 23, 2015. Six months ago, she found a skull and a jaw, but the DNA...more

Hajra Catic and Edmin Jakubovic search for the remains of her son where Edmin had last seen him wounded on the ground in Bokcin Potok near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, June 23, 2015. Six months ago, she found a skull and a jaw, but the DNA results are still not available. She fears that if she doesn't find his remains, it will be as he had never existed. All that is left of her son is his picture. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Hajra Catic's son Nino (R) is seen on this family photo. Hajra is still searching for her son. She lost her husband and 10 other close family members. "If I don't find my son's remains, the enemy will claim he never even existed. That he was never killed. That I had no son.".  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Hajra Catic's son Nino (R) is seen on this family photo. Hajra is still searching for her son. She lost her husband and 10 other close family members. "If I don't find my son's remains, the enemy will claim he never even existed. That he was never...more

Hajra Catic's son Nino (R) is seen on this family photo. Hajra is still searching for her son. She lost her husband and 10 other close family members. "If I don't find my son's remains, the enemy will claim he never even existed. That he was never killed. That I had no son.". REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Curana Zukanovic poses for a picture in her home in a refugee camp Bisca near Banovici, July 1, 2015. Curana Zukanovic is still searching for her two sons. She lost her husband and 5 other close family members. "I pray to dear Allah every day and hope not to die without finding my children." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Curana Zukanovic poses for a picture in her home in a refugee camp Bisca near Banovici, July 1, 2015. Curana Zukanovic is still searching for her two sons. She lost her husband and 5 other close family members. "I pray to dear Allah every day and...more

Curana Zukanovic poses for a picture in her home in a refugee camp Bisca near Banovici, July 1, 2015. Curana Zukanovic is still searching for her two sons. She lost her husband and 5 other close family members. "I pray to dear Allah every day and hope not to die without finding my children." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Curana Zukanovic's sons Jusa and Hajrudin (adults standing in group photo, 2nd R and R) in a family photo taken in refugee camp Bisca near Banovici. She lost her husband and 5 other close family members. "I pray to dear Allah every day and hope not to die without finding my children." 
REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Curana Zukanovic's sons Jusa and Hajrudin (adults standing in group photo, 2nd R and R) in a family photo taken in refugee camp Bisca near Banovici. She lost her husband and 5 other close family members. "I pray to dear Allah every day and hope not...more

Curana Zukanovic's sons Jusa and Hajrudin (adults standing in group photo, 2nd R and R) in a family photo taken in refugee camp Bisca near Banovici. She lost her husband and 5 other close family members. "I pray to dear Allah every day and hope not to die without finding my children." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Rejha Avdic poses for a picture in her home in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, July 1, 2015. Rejha is still searching for her husband. She lost 10 close family members. "I live for the day when I will find remains of my dearest. For the day I will at least know where they are, where their graves are. Where I will be able to pray for them. Justice is slow. But I don't give up."  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Rejha Avdic poses for a picture in her home in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, July 1, 2015. Rejha is still searching for her husband. She lost 10 close family members. "I live for the day when I will find remains of my dearest. For the day I will at...more

Rejha Avdic poses for a picture in her home in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, July 1, 2015. Rejha is still searching for her husband. She lost 10 close family members. "I live for the day when I will find remains of my dearest. For the day I will at least know where they are, where their graves are. Where I will be able to pray for them. Justice is slow. But I don't give up." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Rejha Avdic's husband Ismet (R) is seen in a photo. "I live for the day when I will find remains of my dearest. For the day I will at least know where they are, where their graves are. Where I will be able to pray for them. Justice is slow. But I don't give up."
REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Rejha Avdic's husband Ismet (R) is seen in a photo. "I live for the day when I will find remains of my dearest. For the day I will at least know where they are, where their graves are. Where I will be able to pray for them. Justice is slow. But I...more

Rejha Avdic's husband Ismet (R) is seen in a photo. "I live for the day when I will find remains of my dearest. For the day I will at least know where they are, where their graves are. Where I will be able to pray for them. Justice is slow. But I don't give up." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Emina Osmanovic is seen in her home in a refugee camp Bisca near Banovici, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Emina Osmanovic, is still searching for her son. She lost 15 close family members. "I don't know what is worst. To find his bones and know for sure that he was killed. That he is gone. Or this waiting. Suspense." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Emina Osmanovic is seen in her home in a refugee camp Bisca near Banovici, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Emina Osmanovic, is still searching for her son. She lost 15 close family members. "I don't know what is worst. To find his bones and know for sure that...more

Emina Osmanovic is seen in her home in a refugee camp Bisca near Banovici, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Emina Osmanovic, is still searching for her son. She lost 15 close family members. "I don't know what is worst. To find his bones and know for sure that he was killed. That he is gone. Or this waiting. Suspense." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Emina Osmanovic's son Sakib is seen in a photo in refugee camp Bisca. "I don't know what is worst. To find his bones and know for sure that he was killed. That he is gone. Or this waiting. Suspense." 
REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Emina Osmanovic's son Sakib is seen in a photo in refugee camp Bisca. "I don't know what is worst. To find his bones and know for sure that he was killed. That he is gone. Or this waiting. Suspense." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Emina Osmanovic's son Sakib is seen in a photo in refugee camp Bisca. "I don't know what is worst. To find his bones and know for sure that he was killed. That he is gone. Or this waiting. Suspense." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Sehida Abdurahmanovic poses for a picture in her home in Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Sehida is still searching for her brother. She lost 12 close family members. " Nothing this country does will every surprise me again. There is less and less mass graves. Less and less identifications. I'm afraid that I will never find him. I can't cope with that."  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Sehida Abdurahmanovic poses for a picture in her home in Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Sehida is still searching for her brother. She lost 12 close family members. " Nothing this country does will every surprise me again. There is less and less...more

Sehida Abdurahmanovic poses for a picture in her home in Srebrenica, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Sehida is still searching for her brother. She lost 12 close family members. " Nothing this country does will every surprise me again. There is less and less mass graves. Less and less identifications. I'm afraid that I will never find him. I can't cope with that." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Sehida Abdurahmanovic's brother Meho. "Nothing this country does will every surprise me again.There is less and less mass graves. Less and less identifications. I'm afraid that I will never find him. I can't cope with that". 

REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Sehida Abdurahmanovic's brother Meho. "Nothing this country does will every surprise me again.There is less and less mass graves. Less and less identifications. I'm afraid that I will never find him. I can't cope with that". REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Sehida Abdurahmanovic's brother Meho. "Nothing this country does will every surprise me again.There is less and less mass graves. Less and less identifications. I'm afraid that I will never find him. I can't cope with that". REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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Nura Sulic poses for a picture in her home in Zivinice, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Nura is still searching for her son. She lost 11 close family members. "His photograph is all I have left of him. I pray to dear Allah to find at least one, smallest bone. Anything. So that we would both finally be at peace." REUTERS/Dado Ruvi

Nura Sulic poses for a picture in her home in Zivinice, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Nura is still searching for her son. She lost 11 close family members. "His photograph is all I have left of him. I pray to dear Allah to find at least one, smallest bone....more

Nura Sulic poses for a picture in her home in Zivinice, Bosnia, July 1, 2015. Nura is still searching for her son. She lost 11 close family members. "His photograph is all I have left of him. I pray to dear Allah to find at least one, smallest bone. Anything. So that we would both finally be at peace." REUTERS/Dado Ruvi
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Nura Sulic's son Mirsad. "His photograph is all I have left of him. I pray to dear Allah to find at least one, smallest bone. Anything. So that we would both finally be at peace."  REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Nura Sulic's son Mirsad. "His photograph is all I have left of him. I pray to dear Allah to find at least one, smallest bone. Anything. So that we would both finally be at peace." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Nura Sulic's son Mirsad. "His photograph is all I have left of him. I pray to dear Allah to find at least one, smallest bone. Anything. So that we would both finally be at peace." REUTERS/Dado Ruvic
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