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Pictures | Wed Feb 13, 2019 | 7:45pm EST

The students of Parkland

Emma Gonzalez, student and shooting survivor at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, cries as she addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, March 24, 2018. There were sobs as Gonzalez read the names of the 17 victims and then stood in silence. Tears ran down her cheeks as she stared out over the crowd for the rest of a speech that lasted six minutes and 20 seconds, the time it took for the gunman to slaughter them.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Emma Gonzalez, student and shooting survivor at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, cries as she addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in...more

Emma Gonzalez, student and shooting survivor at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, cries as she addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, March 24, 2018. There were sobs as Gonzalez read the names of the 17 victims and then stood in silence. Tears ran down her cheeks as she stared out over the crowd for the rest of a speech that lasted six minutes and 20 seconds, the time it took for the gunman to slaughter them. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Tyra Hemans, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, speaks with Florida Rep. Wengay "Newt" Newton (D-St. Petersburg), during a meeting at Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. "I am not going back to school until lawmakers, and the president, change this law," said the then-19-year-old senior, who traveled to the state capital to lobby for a ban on assault-style rifles a week after the shooting. "Three people I looked to for advice and courage are gone but never forgotten, and for them, I am going to our state capital to tell lawmakers we are tired and exhausted of stupid gun laws."

REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Tyra Hemans, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, speaks with Florida Rep. Wengay "Newt" Newton (D-St. Petersburg), during a meeting at Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. "I am not going back to school until lawmakers,...more

Tyra Hemans, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, speaks with Florida Rep. Wengay "Newt" Newton (D-St. Petersburg), during a meeting at Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. "I am not going back to school until lawmakers, and the president, change this law," said the then-19-year-old senior, who traveled to the state capital to lobby for a ban on assault-style rifles a week after the shooting. "Three people I looked to for advice and courage are gone but never forgotten, and for them, I am going to our state capital to tell lawmakers we are tired and exhausted of stupid gun laws." REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Aalayah Eastmond testifies during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 7, 2018. She testified that she hid herself under the body of her classmate when the shooter entered her classroom.

REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Aalayah Eastmond testifies during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 7, 2018. She testified that she hid herself under the body of her classmate...more

Aalayah Eastmond testifies during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 7, 2018. She testified that she hid herself under the body of her classmate when the shooter entered her classroom. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
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Parkland high school student activists arrive for the TIME 100 Gala in Manhattan, New York, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Parkland high school student activists arrive for the TIME 100 Gala in Manhattan, New York, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Parkland high school student activists arrive for the TIME 100 Gala in Manhattan, New York, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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David Hogg speaks at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. "We're going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this - this - is not cutting it," the MSD student said during the rally, pointing at the white-domed Capitol behind the stage. On February 11, 2019, almost a year after the shooting, Parkland activists launched a petition campaign to put an assault weapons ban on Florida's ballot in the 2020 election. Hogg attended the campaign kickoff, along with parents of some of the victims. The petition needs 800,000 signatures.


REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

David Hogg speaks at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. "We're going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this - this - is not cutting it," the MSD student...more

David Hogg speaks at the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. "We're going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run not as politicians, but as Americans. Because this - this - is not cutting it," the MSD student said during the rally, pointing at the white-domed Capitol behind the stage. On February 11, 2019, almost a year after the shooting, Parkland activists launched a petition campaign to put an assault weapons ban on Florida's ballot in the 2020 election. Hogg attended the campaign kickoff, along with parents of some of the victims. The petition needs 800,000 signatures. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Samuel Zeif gestures a "zero", saying that he believes Australia solved their school shooting problem by banning firearms, when delivering his remarks to President Donald Trump during his listening session with school shooting survivors and students at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Samuel Zeif gestures a "zero", saying that he believes Australia solved their school shooting problem by banning firearms, when delivering his remarks to President Donald Trump during his listening session with school...more

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Samuel Zeif gestures a "zero", saying that he believes Australia solved their school shooting problem by banning firearms, when delivering his remarks to President Donald Trump during his listening session with school shooting survivors and students at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Delaney Tarr (3rd left) is consoled by fellow Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Dimitri Hoth (R) while Sarah Chadwick (L) and Sophie Whitney join them during a news conference, in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. In a series of recent Twitter messages, Tarr, a March for Our Lives co-founder, reflected on having to put on a composed "performance" over the past year as a public figure on social media. "I can't sit back and let you think that I'm always fine, that I'm always ready to go. That's not realistic," she wrote. "I'm a human being and god damn if all of this work and pain isn't hard."

REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Delaney Tarr (3rd left) is consoled by fellow Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Dimitri Hoth (R) while Sarah Chadwick (L) and Sophie Whitney join them during a news conference, in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. In a series of recent Twitter...more

Delaney Tarr (3rd left) is consoled by fellow Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Dimitri Hoth (R) while Sarah Chadwick (L) and Sophie Whitney join them during a news conference, in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. In a series of recent Twitter messages, Tarr, a March for Our Lives co-founder, reflected on having to put on a composed "performance" over the past year as a public figure on social media. "I can't sit back and let you think that I'm always fine, that I'm always ready to go. That's not realistic," she wrote. "I'm a human being and god damn if all of this work and pain isn't hard." REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Matt Deitsch (L) and Ryan Deitsch discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 20, 2018. Matt Deitsch is among the most prominent Stoneman students who have toured the nation to encourage young people to register and vote for pro-gun control candidates. "We have to replace these terrible actors who are comfortable putting our lives at risk for a check from the NRA (National Rifle Association)," said Deitsch, the chief strategist for March for Our Lives, referring to political incumbents who oppose the group's goals, which include a ban on assault weapons. The group March for Our Lives also backs funding for gun violence research and supports universal background checks, disarming domestic abusers and enacting laws to staunch gun trafficking. "The fact that gun violence is a top issue for the first time ever is something that should scare the people arrayed against us," he said with evident pride. "We carry a heavy weight, and every single day there's another mass shooting in America, and we see ourselves as vessels amplifying what's going on this country," Deitsch said.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Matt Deitsch (L) and Ryan Deitsch discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 20, 2018. Matt Deitsch is among the most prominent Stoneman students...more

Matt Deitsch (L) and Ryan Deitsch discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 20, 2018. Matt Deitsch is among the most prominent Stoneman students who have toured the nation to encourage young people to register and vote for pro-gun control candidates. "We have to replace these terrible actors who are comfortable putting our lives at risk for a check from the NRA (National Rifle Association)," said Deitsch, the chief strategist for March for Our Lives, referring to political incumbents who oppose the group's goals, which include a ban on assault weapons. The group March for Our Lives also backs funding for gun violence research and supports universal background checks, disarming domestic abusers and enacting laws to staunch gun trafficking. "The fact that gun violence is a top issue for the first time ever is something that should scare the people arrayed against us," he said with evident pride. "We carry a heavy weight, and every single day there's another mass shooting in America, and we see ourselves as vessels amplifying what's going on this country," Deitsch said. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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Carlos Rodriguez (2nd R) talks with his schoolmates and co-founders of Stories Untold, a movement created to encourage victims of gun violence to share their stories, during a meeting at his house in Parkland, Florida, April 10, 2018. Rodriguez, a 17-year-old Stoneman Douglas student who witnessed the shooting, launched the social media project to collate footage of the incident. It has evolved into a broader effort to encourage victims of gun violence around the country to share their stories. He says the reaction to Parkland was notably different from previous mass shootings, in part because it affected a group of teenagers well-versed in using social media. The Parkland attack "affected high-school kids, millennials, Generation Z-ers - we practically have a road map of what we need to do."

REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Carlos Rodriguez (2nd R) talks with his schoolmates and co-founders of Stories Untold, a movement created to encourage victims of gun violence to share their stories, during a meeting at his house in Parkland, Florida, April 10, 2018. Rodriguez, a...more

Carlos Rodriguez (2nd R) talks with his schoolmates and co-founders of Stories Untold, a movement created to encourage victims of gun violence to share their stories, during a meeting at his house in Parkland, Florida, April 10, 2018. Rodriguez, a 17-year-old Stoneman Douglas student who witnessed the shooting, launched the social media project to collate footage of the incident. It has evolved into a broader effort to encourage victims of gun violence around the country to share their stories. He says the reaction to Parkland was notably different from previous mass shootings, in part because it affected a group of teenagers well-versed in using social media. The Parkland attack "affected high-school kids, millennials, Generation Z-ers - we practically have a road map of what we need to do." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Daniela Menescal (R) attends a baseball game her brother is playing in, in Parkland, Florida, April 5, 2018. Menescal, 17, was hit by shrapnel during the Parkland attack and saw several classmates killed. Now recovered from her injuries, she puts her energy into spending time with family and focuses on studying piano and playing tennis to avoid thinking about that day. "We've become a more united community after everything that happened," she said. "With the leadership of my classmates, we can raise our voices so that people understand that these changes need to happen."

REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Daniela Menescal (R) attends a baseball game her brother is playing in, in Parkland, Florida, April 5, 2018. Menescal, 17, was hit by shrapnel during the Parkland attack and saw several classmates killed. Now recovered from her injuries, she puts her...more

Daniela Menescal (R) attends a baseball game her brother is playing in, in Parkland, Florida, April 5, 2018. Menescal, 17, was hit by shrapnel during the Parkland attack and saw several classmates killed. Now recovered from her injuries, she puts her energy into spending time with family and focuses on studying piano and playing tennis to avoid thinking about that day. "We've become a more united community after everything that happened," she said. "With the leadership of my classmates, we can raise our voices so that people understand that these changes need to happen." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Tyra Hemans holds a photo of her friend Joaquin Oliver, who died during the shooting, as she and other MSD students speak with the leadership of the Florida Senate, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Tyra Hemans holds a photo of her friend Joaquin Oliver, who died during the shooting, as she and other MSD students speak with the leadership of the Florida Senate, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Tyra Hemans holds a photo of her friend Joaquin Oliver, who died during the shooting, as she and other MSD students speak with the leadership of the Florida Senate, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas speak with Florida state legislators in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas speak with Florida state legislators in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas speak with Florida state legislators in Tallahassee, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Michael J. Weissman, 18, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, carries a sign as he and other participants hold the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Michael J. Weissman, 18, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, carries a sign as he and other participants hold the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Michael J. Weissman, 18, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, carries a sign as he and other participants hold the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
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Charlie Mirsky of Marjory Stoneman Douglas participates with other students from around the country in a Gun Violence Prevention Task Force forum with lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 23, 2018. 

REUTERS/Leah Millis

Charlie Mirsky of Marjory Stoneman Douglas participates with other students from around the country in a Gun Violence Prevention Task Force forum with lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Charlie Mirsky of Marjory Stoneman Douglas participates with other students from around the country in a Gun Violence Prevention Task Force forum with lawmakers on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
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Martin Luther King Jr.'s 9-year-old granddaughter Yolanda Renee King holds hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Jaclyn Corin (R) as they address the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. 

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Martin Luther King Jr.'s 9-year-old granddaughter Yolanda Renee King holds hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Jaclyn Corin (R) as they address the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Martin Luther King Jr.'s 9-year-old granddaughter Yolanda Renee King holds hands with Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Jaclyn Corin (R) as they address the "March for Our Lives" event in Washington, March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Isabella Pfeiffer, 16, listens to answers from leaders of the Florida Senate about changing laws controlling assault weapons, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Isabella Pfeiffer, 16, listens to answers from leaders of the Florida Senate about changing laws controlling assault weapons, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley

Marjory Stoneman Douglas student Isabella Pfeiffer, 16, listens to answers from leaders of the Florida Senate about changing laws controlling assault weapons, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
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Maddie Gaffrey, a 17-year-old junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, holds a picture of her friend Luke Hoyer who was killed in the shooting, in Parkland, Florida, March 18, 2018. REUTERS/Jillian Kitchener

Maddie Gaffrey, a 17-year-old junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, holds a picture of her friend Luke Hoyer who was killed in the shooting, in Parkland, Florida, March 18, 2018. REUTERS/Jillian Kitchener

Maddie Gaffrey, a 17-year-old junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, holds a picture of her friend Luke Hoyer who was killed in the shooting, in Parkland, Florida, March 18, 2018. REUTERS/Jillian Kitchener
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Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student leaders Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin speak to the crowd prior to boarding buses travelling to Tallahassee, Florida to meet with legislators, in Coral Springs, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student leaders Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin speak to the crowd prior to boarding buses travelling to Tallahassee, Florida to meet with legislators, in Coral Springs, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Joe...more

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student leaders Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin speak to the crowd prior to boarding buses travelling to Tallahassee, Florida to meet with legislators, in Coral Springs, Florida, February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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Christy Ma, with other student journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, participates in a discussion "Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy" at Newseum in Washington, U.S., March 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Christy Ma, with other student journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, participates in a discussion "Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy" at Newseum in Washington, U.S., March 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Christy Ma, with other student journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, participates in a discussion "Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy" at Newseum in Washington, U.S., March 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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Parent Melissa Blank (L) and Marjory Stoneman Douglas surviving students Jonathan Blank (2nd L) and Julia Cordover (2nd R) attend with other survivors and the families of victims a listening session held by President Donald Trump to discuss school safety and shootings, at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Parent Melissa Blank (L) and Marjory Stoneman Douglas surviving students Jonathan Blank (2nd L) and Julia Cordover (2nd R) attend with other survivors and the families of victims a listening session held by President Donald Trump to discuss school...more

Parent Melissa Blank (L) and Marjory Stoneman Douglas surviving students Jonathan Blank (2nd L) and Julia Cordover (2nd R) attend with other survivors and the families of victims a listening session held by President Donald Trump to discuss school safety and shootings, at the White House in Washington, February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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