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Pictures | Tue Feb 12, 2019 | 4:45pm EST

The trial of Mexico's 'El Chapo'

The accused Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen in this courtroom sketch on the day he was found guilty of smuggling drugs in Brooklyn federal court in New York, February 12, 2019. The world's most infamous cartel boss, who rose from poverty in rural Mexico to amass billions of dollars, was found guilty in a U.S. court of smuggling tons of drugs to the United States over a violent, colorful, decades-long career.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

The accused Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen in this courtroom sketch on the day he was found guilty of smuggling drugs in Brooklyn federal court in New York, February 12, 2019. The world's most infamous cartel boss, who rose from...more

The accused Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen in this courtroom sketch on the day he was found guilty of smuggling drugs in Brooklyn federal court in New York, February 12, 2019. The world's most infamous cartel boss, who rose from poverty in rural Mexico to amass billions of dollars, was found guilty in a U.S. court of smuggling tons of drugs to the United States over a violent, colorful, decades-long career. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, departs after the trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, in New York, February 12, 2019. Jurors in federal court in Brooklyn convicted Guzman, 61, head of the Sinaloa Cartel, on all 10 counts brought by U.S. prosecutors.

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, departs after the trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, in New York, February 12, 2019. Jurors in federal court in Brooklyn convicted Guzman, 61, head of the Sinaloa Cartel, on all 10 counts...more

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, departs after the trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, in New York, February 12, 2019. Jurors in federal court in Brooklyn convicted Guzman, 61, head of the Sinaloa Cartel, on all 10 counts brought by U.S. prosecutors. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen in this courtroom sketch giving the thumbs up to wife Emma Coronel Aispuro, before being escorted out of courtroom on the day he was found guilty in Brooklyn federal court in New York, February 12, 2019. Richard Donoghue, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, said he expected Guzman to receive life without parole when sentenced on June 25. "It is a sentence from which there is no escape and no return," Donoghue told reporters. Guzman sat and showed no emotion while the verdict was read. Once the jury left the room, he and his wife Emma Coronel, put their hands to their hearts and gave each other the thumbs up sign. His wife shed tears.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen in this courtroom sketch giving the thumbs up to wife Emma Coronel Aispuro, before being escorted out of courtroom on the day he was found guilty in Brooklyn federal court in New York, February 12, 2019. Richard...more

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen in this courtroom sketch giving the thumbs up to wife Emma Coronel Aispuro, before being escorted out of courtroom on the day he was found guilty in Brooklyn federal court in New York, February 12, 2019. Richard Donoghue, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, said he expected Guzman to receive life without parole when sentenced on June 25. "It is a sentence from which there is no escape and no return," Donoghue told reporters. Guzman sat and showed no emotion while the verdict was read. Once the jury left the room, he and his wife Emma Coronel, put their hands to their hearts and gave each other the thumbs up sign. His wife shed tears. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (C), and his wife Emma Coronel Aispuro look on in this courtroom sketch, during closing arguments at his trial, January 31, 2019. Guzman, one of the major figures in Mexican drug wars that have roiled the country since 2006, become almost legendary for escaping from Mexican high-security jails twice and avoiding massive manhunts. He cultivated a Robin Hood image among the poor in his home state of Sinaloa.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (C), and his wife Emma Coronel Aispuro look on in this courtroom sketch, during closing arguments at his trial, January 31, 2019. Guzman, one of the major figures in Mexican drug wars that have roiled the country since 2006,...more

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (C), and his wife Emma Coronel Aispuro look on in this courtroom sketch, during closing arguments at his trial, January 31, 2019. Guzman, one of the major figures in Mexican drug wars that have roiled the country since 2006, become almost legendary for escaping from Mexican high-security jails twice and avoiding massive manhunts. He cultivated a Robin Hood image among the poor in his home state of Sinaloa. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldbarg points at Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (back row C) in this courtroom sketch, January 30, 2019. Guzman, whose nickname means "Shorty," was extradited to the United States for trial in 2017 after he was arrested in Mexico the year before. Though other high-ranking cartel figures had been extradited previously, Guzman was the first to go to trial instead of pleading guilty.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldbarg points at Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (back row C) in this courtroom sketch, January 30, 2019. Guzman, whose nickname means "Shorty," was extradited to the United States for trial in 2017 after he was arrested in...more

Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldbarg points at Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (back row C) in this courtroom sketch, January 30, 2019. Guzman, whose nickname means "Shorty," was extradited to the United States for trial in 2017 after he was arrested in Mexico the year before. Though other high-ranking cartel figures had been extradited previously, Guzman was the first to go to trial instead of pleading guilty. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, February 11, 2019. The 11-week trial, with testimony from more than 50 witnesses, offered an unprecedented look at the inner workings of the Sinaloa Cartel, named for the state in northwestern Mexico where Guzman was born in a poor mountain village. The U.S. government said Guzman trafficked tons of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine into the United States over more than two decades, consolidating his power in Mexico through murders and wars with rival cartels.

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, February 11, 2019. The 11-week trial, with testimony from more than 50 witnesses, offered an unprecedented look at the inner workings of the Sinaloa Cartel,...more

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, February 11, 2019. The 11-week trial, with testimony from more than 50 witnesses, offered an unprecedented look at the inner workings of the Sinaloa Cartel, named for the state in northwestern Mexico where Guzman was born in a poor mountain village. The U.S. government said Guzman trafficked tons of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine into the United States over more than two decades, consolidating his power in Mexico through murders and wars with rival cartels. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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A convoy of law enforcement vehicles transporting Joaquin Guzman crosses the Brooklyn Bridge heading to the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse for his trial, February 11, 2019. Small in stature, Guzman's smuggling exploits, the violence he used and the sheer size of his illicit business made Guzman the world's most notorious drug baron since Colombia's Pablo Escobar, who was shot dead by police in 1993.

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

A convoy of law enforcement vehicles transporting Joaquin Guzman crosses the Brooklyn Bridge heading to the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse for his trial, February 11, 2019. Small in stature, Guzman's smuggling exploits, the violence he used and the...more

A convoy of law enforcement vehicles transporting Joaquin Guzman crosses the Brooklyn Bridge heading to the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse for his trial, February 11, 2019. Small in stature, Guzman's smuggling exploits, the violence he used and the sheer size of his illicit business made Guzman the world's most notorious drug baron since Colombia's Pablo Escobar, who was shot dead by police in 1993. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, exits the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, January 29, 2019. Guzman's lawyers say he was set up as a "fall guy" by Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada, a powerful drug lord from Sinaloa who remains at large. Jeffrey Lichtman, a lawyer for Guzman, told reporters after the verdict that the defense faced an uphill fight, given the amount of evidence the government presented, and the widespread perception that Guzman was already guilty. "This was a case that was literally an avalanche, avalanche of evidence," Lichtman said. "Of course we're going to appeal."

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, exits the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, January 29, 2019. Guzman's lawyers say he was set up as a "fall guy" by Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada, a powerful drug lord from Sinaloa who remains at large. Jeffrey...more

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, exits the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, January 29, 2019. Guzman's lawyers say he was set up as a "fall guy" by Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada, a powerful drug lord from Sinaloa who remains at large. Jeffrey Lichtman, a lawyer for Guzman, told reporters after the verdict that the defense faced an uphill fight, given the amount of evidence the government presented, and the widespread perception that Guzman was already guilty. "This was a case that was literally an avalanche, avalanche of evidence," Lichtman said. "Of course we're going to appeal." REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez is questioned by Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldberg in this courtroom sketch, January 17, 2019. The most detailed evidence against Guzman came from more than a dozen former associates who struck deals to cooperate with U.S. prosecutors. They told jurors how the Sinaloa Cartel gained power in the 1990s, eventually coming to control almost the entire Pacific coast of Mexico.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez is questioned by Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldberg in this courtroom sketch, January 17, 2019. The most detailed evidence against Guzman came from more than a dozen former associates who struck...more

Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez is questioned by Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldberg in this courtroom sketch, January 17, 2019. The most detailed evidence against Guzman came from more than a dozen former associates who struck deals to cooperate with U.S. prosecutors. They told jurors how the Sinaloa Cartel gained power in the 1990s, eventually coming to control almost the entire Pacific coast of Mexico. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez shows video of tunnels in this courtroom sketch, January 17, 2019. Guzman made a name for himself in the 1980s by building cross-border tunnels that allowed him to move cocaine from Mexico into the United States faster than anyone else.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez shows video of tunnels in this courtroom sketch, January 17, 2019. Guzman made a name for himself in the 1980s by building cross-border tunnels that allowed him to move cocaine from Mexico into the...more

Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez shows video of tunnels in this courtroom sketch, January 17, 2019. Guzman made a name for himself in the 1980s by building cross-border tunnels that allowed him to move cocaine from Mexico into the United States faster than anyone else. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Lucero Guadalupe Sanchez Lopez, a girlfriend of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (front, 2nd R) testifies as Guzman's wife Emma Coronel (R) looks on from the gallery, with Guzman's defense attorney Eduardo Balarezo (2nd L) listening, January 17, 2019. The witnesses, who included some of Guzman's top lieutenants, a communications engineer and a onetime mistress, described how he built a sophisticated organization reminiscent of a multinational corporation. He sent drugs northward with fleets of planes and boats, and had detailed accounting ledgers and an encrypted electronic communication system run through secret computer servers in Canada, the court heard.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Lucero Guadalupe Sanchez Lopez, a girlfriend of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (front, 2nd R) testifies as Guzman's wife Emma Coronel (R) looks on from the gallery, with Guzman's defense attorney Eduardo Balarezo (2nd L) listening, January 17, 2019. The...more

Lucero Guadalupe Sanchez Lopez, a girlfriend of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman (front, 2nd R) testifies as Guzman's wife Emma Coronel (R) looks on from the gallery, with Guzman's defense attorney Eduardo Balarezo (2nd L) listening, January 17, 2019. The witnesses, who included some of Guzman's top lieutenants, a communications engineer and a onetime mistress, described how he built a sophisticated organization reminiscent of a multinational corporation. He sent drugs northward with fleets of planes and boats, and had detailed accounting ledgers and an encrypted electronic communication system run through secret computer servers in Canada, the court heard. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
Close
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A diamond-encrusted pistol that government witness Jesus Zambada said belonged to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, is shown up close in this government evidence photo, November 19, 2018. Guzman's attempt to take territory from a rival cartel was one of the main reasons for an explosion of drug violence in Mexico. The government has registered more than 250,000 homicides since it launched an aggressive war on cartels in 2006. A report by the U.S. Congressional Research Service last year estimated 150,000 of those deaths were tied to organized crime. A former bodyguard testified that he watched Guzman kill three rival drug cartel members, including one victim who he shot and then ordered to be buried even as he was still gasping for air.

Courtesy U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)/Handout via REUTERS

A diamond-encrusted pistol that government witness Jesus Zambada said belonged to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, is shown up close in this government evidence photo, November 19, 2018. Guzman's attempt to take territory from a rival cartel was one of the...more

A diamond-encrusted pistol that government witness Jesus Zambada said belonged to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, is shown up close in this government evidence photo, November 19, 2018. Guzman's attempt to take territory from a rival cartel was one of the main reasons for an explosion of drug violence in Mexico. The government has registered more than 250,000 homicides since it launched an aggressive war on cartels in 2006. A report by the U.S. Congressional Research Service last year estimated 150,000 of those deaths were tied to organized crime. A former bodyguard testified that he watched Guzman kill three rival drug cartel members, including one victim who he shot and then ordered to be buried even as he was still gasping for air. Courtesy U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)/Handout via REUTERS
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A diamond-encrusted pistol that government witness Jesus Zambada said belonged to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, is shown in this government evidence photo, November 19, 2018. Estimates of how much money Guzman made from drugs vary. In 2009, Forbes Magazine put him on its list of the world s richest people, with an estimated $1 billion. It later dropped him from the list, saying it was too difficult to quantify his assets. The U.S. Justice Department said in 2017 it sought forfeiture of more than $14 billion in drug proceeds and illicit profits from Guzman.

Courtesy U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)/Handout via REUTERS

A diamond-encrusted pistol that government witness Jesus Zambada said belonged to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, is shown in this government evidence photo, November 19, 2018. Estimates of how much money Guzman made from drugs vary. In 2009, Forbes...more

A diamond-encrusted pistol that government witness Jesus Zambada said belonged to Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, is shown in this government evidence photo, November 19, 2018. Estimates of how much money Guzman made from drugs vary. In 2009, Forbes Magazine put him on its list of the world s richest people, with an estimated $1 billion. It later dropped him from the list, saying it was too difficult to quantify his assets. The U.S. Justice Department said in 2017 it sought forfeiture of more than $14 billion in drug proceeds and illicit profits from Guzman. Courtesy U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)/Handout via REUTERS
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Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman listens to a testimony by Isaias Valdez Rios (not shown) in this courtroom sketch, January 24, 2019. The most shocking allegation of corruption during the trial came from Guzman's former top aide Alex Cifuentes, who accused former Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto of taking a $100 million bribe from Guzman. A spokesman for the ex-president has denied the claim.

REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman listens to a testimony by Isaias Valdez Rios (not shown) in this courtroom sketch, January 24, 2019. The most shocking allegation of corruption during the trial came from Guzman's former top aide Alex Cifuentes, who accused...more

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman listens to a testimony by Isaias Valdez Rios (not shown) in this courtroom sketch, January 24, 2019. The most shocking allegation of corruption during the trial came from Guzman's former top aide Alex Cifuentes, who accused former Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto of taking a $100 million bribe from Guzman. A spokesman for the ex-president has denied the claim. REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg
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Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, November 13, 2018. Despite his ties to government officials, Guzman often lived on the run. Imprisoned in Mexico in 1993, he escaped in 2001 hidden in a laundry cart and spent the following years moving from one hideout to another in the mountains of Sinaloa, guarded by a private army. He was seized again in 2014, but pulled off his best known escape the following year when he disappeared into a tunnel dug into his cell in a maximum security prison. But the Mexican government says he blew his cover through a series of slip ups, including an attempt to make a movie about his life. He was finally recaptured in January 2016.

REUTERS/Mike Segar

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, November 13, 2018. Despite his ties to government officials, Guzman often lived on the run. Imprisoned in Mexico in 1993, he escaped in 2001 hidden in a...more

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, November 13, 2018. Despite his ties to government officials, Guzman often lived on the run. Imprisoned in Mexico in 1993, he escaped in 2001 hidden in a laundry cart and spent the following years moving from one hideout to another in the mountains of Sinaloa, guarded by a private army. He was seized again in 2014, but pulled off his best known escape the following year when he disappeared into a tunnel dug into his cell in a maximum security prison. But the Mexican government says he blew his cover through a series of slip ups, including an attempt to make a movie about his life. He was finally recaptured in January 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Police patrol outside the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, November 13, 2018. Despite Guzman's downfall, the Sinaloa Cartel still has the biggest U.S. distribution presence of Mexican cartels, followed by the fast-growing Jalisco New Generation Cartel, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Together, they are the biggest producers of drugs sold on U.S. streets.

REUTERS/Mike Segar

Police patrol outside the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, November 13, 2018. Despite Guzman's downfall, the Sinaloa Cartel still has the biggest U.S. distribution presence of Mexican cartels, followed by the fast-growing Jalisco New Generation Cartel,...more

Police patrol outside the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, November 13, 2018. Despite Guzman's downfall, the Sinaloa Cartel still has the biggest U.S. distribution presence of Mexican cartels, followed by the fast-growing Jalisco New Generation Cartel, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Together, they are the biggest producers of drugs sold on U.S. streets. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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