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Pictures | Thu Apr 20, 2017 | 4:40pm EDT

The 'weed nuns' of California

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, smoke a joint at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. Based near the town of Merced in the Central Valley, which produces over half of the fruit, vegetables and nuts grown in the United States, the Sisters of the Valley grow and harvest their own cannabis plants. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, smoke a joint at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. Based near the town of Merced in the Central Valley, which produces over half of the...more

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, smoke a joint at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. Based near the town of Merced in the Central Valley, which produces over half of the fruit, vegetables and nuts grown in the United States, the Sisters of the Valley grow and harvest their own cannabis plants. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, lights a joint at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. The sisterhood stresses that its seven members, despite the moniker, do not belong to any order of the Catholic Church. Meeusen adopted the nun persona after she took part in an Occupy Wall Street protest in 2011 dressed as a Catholic nun, a look that led her to be known by protesters as "Sister Occupy." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, lights a joint at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. The sisterhood stresses that its seven members, despite the moniker, do not belong to any order of the Catholic Church. Meeusen adopted the nun...more

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, lights a joint at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. The sisterhood stresses that its seven members, despite the moniker, do not belong to any order of the Catholic Church. Meeusen adopted the nun persona after she took part in an Occupy Wall Street protest in 2011 dressed as a Catholic nun, a look that led her to be known by protesters as "Sister Occupy." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trims hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. The group says its Holy Trinity is the marijuana plant, specifically hemp, a strain of marijuana that has very low levels of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound in the plant.

Members turn the hemp into cannabis-based balms and ointments, which they say have the power to improve health and well-being. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trims hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. The group says its Holy Trinity is the marijuana plant, specifically hemp, a strain of marijuana that...more

California "weed nun" India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trims hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. The group says its Holy Trinity is the marijuana plant, specifically hemp, a strain of marijuana that has very low levels of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound in the plant. Members turn the hemp into cannabis-based balms and ointments, which they say have the power to improve health and well-being. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, sit with their pets in the garden at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. "A sister becomes a sister through a commercial relationship and earning a wage or a commission and we want to grow this way because we want to free the women, we don't want to make them more dependent," said Christine Meeusen.
She said the group had roughly $750,000 in sales last year, the most since it started selling products in January 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, sit with their pets in the garden at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. "A sister becomes a sister...more

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, sit with their pets in the garden at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. "A sister becomes a sister through a commercial relationship and earning a wage or a commission and we want to grow this way because we want to free the women, we don't want to make them more dependent," said Christine Meeusen. She said the group had roughly $750,000 in sales last year, the most since it started selling products in January 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, carries hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, carries hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, carries hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, sit with their pets in the garden at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, sit with their pets in the garden at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, sit with their pets in the garden at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, who goes by the name Sister Kate, smells hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. Meeusen adopted the nun persona after she took part in an Occupy Wall Street protest in 2011 dressed as a Catholic nun, a look that led her to be known by protesters as "Sister Occupy.� REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, who goes by the name Sister Kate, smells hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. Meeusen adopted the nun persona after she took part in an Occupy Wall Street protest in 2011...more

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, who goes by the name Sister Kate, smells hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. Meeusen adopted the nun persona after she took part in an Occupy Wall Street protest in 2011 dressed as a Catholic nun, a look that led her to be known by protesters as "Sister Occupy.� REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Hemp is hung to dry at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hemp is hung to dry at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hemp is hung to dry at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, ladles CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, ladles CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, ladles CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, pours CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, pours CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, pours CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, opens a bag of hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, opens a bag of hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, opens a bag of hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, takes hemp out of the refrigerator at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, takes hemp out of the refrigerator at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, takes hemp out of the refrigerator at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, check hemp that is drying at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, check hemp that is drying at Sisters of the Valley near...more

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (L), Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya (R), and India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, check hemp that is drying at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Name badges are seen in the office of Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Name badges are seen in the office of Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Name badges are seen in the office of Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, checks hemp that is drying at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, checks hemp that is drying at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, checks hemp that is drying at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, trims hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, trims hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, trims hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (R), adjusts the habit of India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (R), adjusts the habit of India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (R), adjusts the habit of India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, poses for a portrait with hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, poses for a portrait with hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate, poses for a portrait with hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Hemp is seen in bags at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hemp is seen in bags at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hemp is seen in bags at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, holds soap made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, holds soap made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

California "weed nun" Desiree Calderon, who goes by the name Sister Freya, holds soap made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley near Merced, California. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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