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Pictures | Wed Aug 18, 2021 | 1:16pm EDT

The women and girls of Afghanistan

Khatera, 33, an Afghan police woman who was blinded after a gunmen attack in Ghazni province, speaks during an interview in Kabul, Afghanistan October 12, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Khatera, 33, an Afghan police woman who was blinded after a gunmen attack in Ghazni province, speaks during an interview in Kabul, Afghanistan October 12, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Khatera, 33, an Afghan police woman who was blinded after a gunmen attack in Ghazni province, speaks during an interview in Kabul, Afghanistan October 12, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan girls cover their faces as they ride on swings during the first day of the Muslim holiday of the Eid al-Adha, in Kabul, Afghanistan August 11, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls cover their faces as they ride on swings during the first day of the Muslim holiday of the Eid al-Adha, in Kabul, Afghanistan August 11, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls cover their faces as they ride on swings during the first day of the Muslim holiday of the Eid al-Adha, in Kabul, Afghanistan August 11, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer
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A young Afghan woman shows her face in public for the first time after five years of Taliban Sharia law as she waits at a food distribution centre in central Kabul November 14, 2001. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis

A young Afghan woman shows her face in public for the first time after five years of Taliban Sharia law as she waits at a food distribution centre in central Kabul November 14, 2001. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis

A young Afghan woman shows her face in public for the first time after five years of Taliban Sharia law as she waits at a food distribution centre in central Kabul November 14, 2001. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
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Female soldiers Mohazama Najebi, 18 (R), and Sahar Ibrahimi, 25 (L), from the Afghan National Army (ANA) pose for a picture after shooting exercises at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Female soldiers Mohazama Najebi, 18 (R), and Sahar Ibrahimi, 25 (L), from the Afghan National Army (ANA) pose for a picture after shooting exercises at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Female soldiers Mohazama Najebi, 18 (R), and Sahar Ibrahimi, 25 (L), from the Afghan National Army (ANA) pose for a picture after shooting exercises at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women's rights activists chant slogans during the funeral ceremony of Farkhunda, an Afghan woman who was beaten to death and set alight on fire, in Kabul March 22, 2015. The 27-year-old woman killed by an angry mob in front of police in the Afghan capital for allegedly burning a copy of Islam's holy book was wrongly accused, Afghanistan's top criminal investigator said. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women's rights activists chant slogans during the funeral ceremony of Farkhunda, an Afghan woman who was beaten to death and set alight on fire, in Kabul March 22, 2015. The 27-year-old woman killed by an angry mob in front of police in the...more

Afghan women's rights activists chant slogans during the funeral ceremony of Farkhunda, an Afghan woman who was beaten to death and set alight on fire, in Kabul March 22, 2015. The 27-year-old woman killed by an angry mob in front of police in the Afghan capital for allegedly burning a copy of Islam's holy book was wrongly accused, Afghanistan's top criminal investigator said. REUTERS/Stringer
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Newborn children who lost their mothers during an attack on a maternity clinic lie on a bed at a hospital, in Kabul, Afghanistan May 13, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Newborn children who lost their mothers during an attack on a maternity clinic lie on a bed at a hospital, in Kabul, Afghanistan May 13, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Newborn children who lost their mothers during an attack on a maternity clinic lie on a bed at a hospital, in Kabul, Afghanistan May 13, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women mourn inside a hospital compound after a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan December 28, 2017.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women mourn inside a hospital compound after a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan December 28, 2017.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women mourn inside a hospital compound after a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan December 28, 2017.  REUTERS/Stringer
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Female students of American University of Afghanistan hug each other as they arrive for new orientation sessions at the school in Kabul, Afghanistan March 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Female students of American University of Afghanistan hug each other as they arrive for new orientation sessions at the school in Kabul, Afghanistan March 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Female students of American University of Afghanistan hug each other as they arrive for new orientation sessions at the school in Kabul, Afghanistan March 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer
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Members of Afghan robotics girls team, which was denied entry into the United States for a competition, work on their robots in Herat province, Afghanistan July 4, 2017.   REUTERS/Stringer

Members of Afghan robotics girls team, which was denied entry into the United States for a competition, work on their robots in Herat province, Afghanistan July 4, 2017.   REUTERS/Stringer

Members of Afghan robotics girls team, which was denied entry into the United States for a competition, work on their robots in Herat province, Afghanistan July 4, 2017.   REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan female engineers work on a map of the ruined Darul Aman palace in Kabul, Afghanistan October 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan female engineers work on a map of the ruined Darul Aman palace in Kabul, Afghanistan October 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan female engineers work on a map of the ruined Darul Aman palace in Kabul, Afghanistan October 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer
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Shamsia Alizada, 18, who topped the country's university entrance exam, poses for a picture after an interview at her house in Kabul, Afghanistan September 25, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Shamsia Alizada, 18, who topped the country's university entrance exam, poses for a picture after an interview at her house in Kabul, Afghanistan September 25, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Shamsia Alizada, 18, who topped the country's university entrance exam, poses for a picture after an interview at her house in Kabul, Afghanistan September 25, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer
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Fakria Azizi, a member of the Zohra orchestra, an ensemble of 35 women, practises during a session at Afghanistan's National Institute of Music in Kabul, Afghanistan April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Fakria Azizi, a member of the Zohra orchestra, an ensemble of 35 women, practises during a session at Afghanistan's National Institute of Music in Kabul, Afghanistan April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Fakria Azizi, a member of the Zohra orchestra, an ensemble of 35 women, practises during a session at Afghanistan's National Institute of Music in Kabul, Afghanistan April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer
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Female students of American University of Afghanistan attend new orientation sessions at the school in Kabul, Afghanistan March 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Female students of American University of Afghanistan attend new orientation sessions at the school in Kabul, Afghanistan March 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Female students of American University of Afghanistan attend new orientation sessions at the school in Kabul, Afghanistan March 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer
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Noor Zia, 40, poses for a photograph with her daughter Saba Ahmadi, 11, at their home in Kabul February 13, 2014. Noor, who is a teacher, studied until she was 28. Her ambition was to become a doctor, but she couldn't afford the fees. She hopes her daughter will become a well-known, highly skilled doctor. Saba wants to go to university, and would like to become a renowned lawyer. REUTERS/Stringer

Noor Zia, 40, poses for a photograph with her daughter Saba Ahmadi, 11, at their home in Kabul February 13, 2014. Noor, who is a teacher, studied until she was 28. Her ambition was to become a doctor, but she couldn't afford the fees. She hopes her...more

Noor Zia, 40, poses for a photograph with her daughter Saba Ahmadi, 11, at their home in Kabul February 13, 2014. Noor, who is a teacher, studied until she was 28. Her ambition was to become a doctor, but she couldn't afford the fees. She hopes her daughter will become a well-known, highly skilled doctor. Saba wants to go to university, and would like to become a renowned lawyer. REUTERS/Stringer
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Khatira Ahmadi (R), 20, producer of Zan TV station (women's TV), adjusts the headscarf of a presenter before recording in Kabul, Afghanistan May 8, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Khatira Ahmadi (R), 20, producer of Zan TV station (women's TV), adjusts the headscarf of a presenter before recording in Kabul, Afghanistan May 8, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Khatira Ahmadi (R), 20, producer of Zan TV station (women's TV), adjusts the headscarf of a presenter before recording in Kabul, Afghanistan May 8, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer
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Tattoo artist Soraya Shahidy works on a client at her beauty salon in Kabul, Afghanistan November 10, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Tattoo artist Soraya Shahidy works on a client at her beauty salon in Kabul, Afghanistan November 10, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer

Tattoo artist Soraya Shahidy works on a client at her beauty salon in Kabul, Afghanistan November 10, 2020. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan girl practices a traditional dance at an Afghan Child Education and Care Organization center (AFCECO) in Kabul, Afghanistan March 3, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl practices a traditional dance at an Afghan Child Education and Care Organization center (AFCECO) in Kabul, Afghanistan March 3, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl practices a traditional dance at an Afghan Child Education and Care Organization center (AFCECO) in Kabul, Afghanistan March 3, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman walks along a street covered with snow on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan February 7, 2017.  REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman walks along a street covered with snow on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan February 7, 2017.  REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman walks along a street covered with snow on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan February 7, 2017.  REUTERS/Stringer
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Hanifa Doosti (C), 17,  and other students of the Shaolin Wushu club show their Wushu skills to other students on a hilltop in Kabul, Afghanistan January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Hanifa Doosti (C), 17,  and other students of the Shaolin Wushu club show their Wushu skills to other students on a hilltop in Kabul, Afghanistan January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Hanifa Doosti (C), 17,  and other students of the Shaolin Wushu club show their Wushu skills to other students on a hilltop in Kabul, Afghanistan January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan paraglider Zakia Mohammadi, 21, flies in Kabul, Afghanistan September 14, 2015. Mohammadi is one of two women in a group of young Afghans taking to the skies of a capital where military helicopters and surveillance balloons are a far more familiar sight. Paragliding is an expensive pastime, however, in a city where the average wage is about $200 a month. Even a middle-class Afghan will find it tough to afford the $500 cost of two weeks of training, while paragliding equipment costs $5,000. Getting to the tops of hills takes hours of climbing in a four-wheel drive vehicle, in the absence of proper roads. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan paraglider Zakia Mohammadi, 21, flies in Kabul, Afghanistan September 14, 2015. Mohammadi is one of two women in a group of young Afghans taking to the skies of a capital where military helicopters and surveillance balloons are a far more...more

Afghan paraglider Zakia Mohammadi, 21, flies in Kabul, Afghanistan September 14, 2015. Mohammadi is one of two women in a group of young Afghans taking to the skies of a capital where military helicopters and surveillance balloons are a far more familiar sight. Paragliding is an expensive pastime, however, in a city where the average wage is about $200 a month. Even a middle-class Afghan will find it tough to afford the $500 cost of two weeks of training, while paragliding equipment costs $5,000. Getting to the tops of hills takes hours of climbing in a four-wheel drive vehicle, in the absence of proper roads. REUTERS/Stringer
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Girls, who are part of Afghan Mobile Mini Circus for Children (MMCC), participate in a juggling competition in Kabul, Afghanistan August 12, 2015. The MMCC, founded by David Mason from Denmark, teaches cooperation and creativity to children scarred by years of war in Afghanistan. Despite the dangers, the project has grown so popular that it now runs centres in ten provinces and has hundreds of regular students. The circus makes visits to internally displaced persons' camps, schools, orphanages, and holds annual festivals. The children are taught the skills of juggling clubs, walking on stilts and acrobatics. REUTERS/Stringer

Girls, who are part of Afghan Mobile Mini Circus for Children (MMCC), participate in a juggling competition in Kabul, Afghanistan August 12, 2015. The MMCC, founded by David Mason from Denmark, teaches cooperation and creativity to children scarred...more

Girls, who are part of Afghan Mobile Mini Circus for Children (MMCC), participate in a juggling competition in Kabul, Afghanistan August 12, 2015. The MMCC, founded by David Mason from Denmark, teaches cooperation and creativity to children scarred by years of war in Afghanistan. Despite the dangers, the project has grown so popular that it now runs centres in ten provinces and has hundreds of regular students. The circus makes visits to internally displaced persons' camps, schools, orphanages, and holds annual festivals. The children are taught the skills of juggling clubs, walking on stilts and acrobatics. REUTERS/Stringer
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Masooma Alizada, a member of Afghanistan's Women's National Cycling Team walks with her bicycle in Kabul February 20, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Masooma Alizada, a member of Afghanistan's Women's National Cycling Team walks with her bicycle in Kabul February 20, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Masooma Alizada, a member of Afghanistan's Women's National Cycling Team walks with her bicycle in Kabul February 20, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan girl plays with a rope on a hilltop in Kabul, Afghanistan May 18, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl plays with a rope on a hilltop in Kabul, Afghanistan May 18, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl plays with a rope on a hilltop in Kabul, Afghanistan May 18, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer
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Sharbat Gula, the green-eyed "Afghan Girl" who was photographed by Steve McCurry in 1985 in National Geographic and became a symbol of her country's wars, arrives to meet with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, Afghanistan November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Sharbat Gula, the green-eyed "Afghan Girl" who was photographed by Steve McCurry in 1985 in National Geographic and became a symbol of her country's wars, arrives to meet with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, Afghanistan November 9,...more

Sharbat Gula, the green-eyed "Afghan Girl" who was photographed by Steve McCurry in 1985 in National Geographic and became a symbol of her country's wars, arrives to meet with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, Afghanistan November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer
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Zarmina Ahmadi, 22, a female soldier from the Afghan National Army (ANA) looks out from a bus window at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Zarmina Ahmadi, 22, a female soldier from the Afghan National Army (ANA) looks out from a bus window at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Zarmina Ahmadi, 22, a female soldier from the Afghan National Army (ANA) looks out from a bus window at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, Afghanistan October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer
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Female Afghan National Army (ANA) officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Kabul Military Training Centre August 24, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

Female Afghan National Army (ANA) officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Kabul Military Training Centre August 24, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

Female Afghan National Army (ANA) officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Kabul Military Training Centre August 24, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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Colonel Jamila Bayaaz talks on the phone at her office before an interview in Kabul January 15, 2014. The Afghan policewoman took charge of a district in the capital, such an unusual and dangerous appointment in a country where women have few rights that her bosses gave her four bodyguards. Bayaaz, who joined the force more than 30 years ago, heads one of Kabul's busiest shopping districts.  REUTERS/Stringer

Colonel Jamila Bayaaz talks on the phone at her office before an interview in Kabul January 15, 2014. The Afghan policewoman took charge of a district in the capital, such an unusual and dangerous appointment in a country where women have few rights...more

Colonel Jamila Bayaaz talks on the phone at her office before an interview in Kabul January 15, 2014. The Afghan policewoman took charge of a district in the capital, such an unusual and dangerous appointment in a country where women have few rights that her bosses gave her four bodyguards. Bayaaz, who joined the force more than 30 years ago, heads one of Kabul's busiest shopping districts.  REUTERS/Stringer
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Sahar Gul, an Afghan girl who was tortured for months after refusing prostitution, lies on a hospital bed in Kabul December 31, 2011. The 15-year-old was brutally tortured, beaten and locked in a toilet by her husband's family for months after she refused to become a prostitute, officials said. She was in critical condition when she was rescued from a house in northern Baghlan province a week earlier. REUTERS/Stringer

Sahar Gul, an Afghan girl who was tortured for months after refusing prostitution, lies on a hospital bed in Kabul December 31, 2011. The 15-year-old was brutally tortured, beaten and locked in a toilet by her husband's family for months after she...more

Sahar Gul, an Afghan girl who was tortured for months after refusing prostitution, lies on a hospital bed in Kabul December 31, 2011. The 15-year-old was brutally tortured, beaten and locked in a toilet by her husband's family for months after she refused to become a prostitute, officials said. She was in critical condition when she was rescued from a house in northern Baghlan province a week earlier. REUTERS/Stringer
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Relatives carry the body of one of the female judges shot dead by unknown gunmen in Kabul, Afghanistan January 17, 2021. REUTERS/Stringer

Relatives carry the body of one of the female judges shot dead by unknown gunmen in Kabul, Afghanistan January 17, 2021. REUTERS/Stringer

Relatives carry the body of one of the female judges shot dead by unknown gunmen in Kabul, Afghanistan January 17, 2021. REUTERS/Stringer
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Anisa Mangal holds a photo of her daughter Mena Mangal, an Afghan journalist and parliamentary adviser, who was killed in Kabul, Afghanistan May 14, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Anisa Mangal holds a photo of her daughter Mena Mangal, an Afghan journalist and parliamentary adviser, who was killed in Kabul, Afghanistan May 14, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Anisa Mangal holds a photo of her daughter Mena Mangal, an Afghan journalist and parliamentary adviser, who was killed in Kabul, Afghanistan May 14, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan girls stand at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan February 1, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls stand at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan February 1, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls stand at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan February 1, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer
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Teacher Mahajera Armani and her class of girls pose for a picture at their study open area, founded by Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC), outside Jalalabad city, Afghanistan September 19, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Teacher Mahajera Armani and her class of girls pose for a picture at their study open area, founded by Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC), outside Jalalabad city, Afghanistan September 19, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Teacher Mahajera Armani and her class of girls pose for a picture at their study open area, founded by Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC), outside Jalalabad city, Afghanistan September 19, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer
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Farahnaz Forotan, 26, an Afghan journalist, poses for a picture in Kabul, Afghanistan April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Farahnaz Forotan, 26, an Afghan journalist, poses for a picture in Kabul, Afghanistan April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Farahnaz Forotan, 26, an Afghan journalist, poses for a picture in Kabul, Afghanistan April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women attend a consultative grand assembly, known as Loya Jirga, in Kabul, Afghanistan April 29, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women attend a consultative grand assembly, known as Loya Jirga, in Kabul, Afghanistan April 29, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women attend a consultative grand assembly, known as Loya Jirga, in Kabul, Afghanistan April 29, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women stand at a kiosk during the inauguration of "Spring of Holy Quran" exhibition during the month of Ramadan, in Kabul, Afghanistan June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women stand at a kiosk during the inauguration of "Spring of Holy Quran" exhibition during the month of Ramadan, in Kabul, Afghanistan June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women stand at a kiosk during the inauguration of "Spring of Holy Quran" exhibition during the month of Ramadan, in Kabul, Afghanistan June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer
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Kanaz, 21, gets out of a car after a practical driving lesson in Kabul August 14, 2014. In the city's private driving schools, students pay a $60 fee for a 45-day course, which includes oral and practical driving tests at the country's Traffic Department. Some of the women who have signed up say learning to drive is a way to escape unwanted gazes and physical harassment on the cramped, crowded minibuses that are often the only method of urban public transport. REUTERS/Stringer

Kanaz, 21, gets out of a car after a practical driving lesson in Kabul August 14, 2014. In the city's private driving schools, students pay a $60 fee for a 45-day course, which includes oral and practical driving tests at the country's Traffic...more

Kanaz, 21, gets out of a car after a practical driving lesson in Kabul August 14, 2014. In the city's private driving schools, students pay a $60 fee for a 45-day course, which includes oral and practical driving tests at the country's Traffic Department. Some of the women who have signed up say learning to drive is a way to escape unwanted gazes and physical harassment on the cramped, crowded minibuses that are often the only method of urban public transport. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan mothers visit a health clinic in Eshkashem district of Badakhshan province, northeast of Kabul, April 23, 2008.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan mothers visit a health clinic in Eshkashem district of Badakhshan province, northeast of Kabul, April 23, 2008.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan mothers visit a health clinic in Eshkashem district of Badakhshan province, northeast of Kabul, April 23, 2008.  REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan midwife looks at newborn babies at Cure International's hospital in Kabul May 8, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan midwife looks at newborn babies at Cure International's hospital in Kabul May 8, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan midwife looks at newborn babies at Cure International's hospital in Kabul May 8, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan family travelling on a bus watch a protest to condemn the killing of 27-year-old woman, Farkhunda, who was beaten with sticks and set on fire by a crowd of men in central Kabul in broad daylight, in Kabul March 24, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan family travelling on a bus watch a protest to condemn the killing of 27-year-old woman, Farkhunda, who was beaten with sticks and set on fire by a crowd of men in central Kabul in broad daylight, in Kabul March 24, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan family travelling on a bus watch a protest to condemn the killing of 27-year-old woman, Farkhunda, who was beaten with sticks and set on fire by a crowd of men in central Kabul in broad daylight, in Kabul March 24, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan girl holds an umbrella as she sits on a grave at a cemetery in Kabul, February 12, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl holds an umbrella as she sits on a grave at a cemetery in Kabul, February 12, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl holds an umbrella as she sits on a grave at a cemetery in Kabul, February 12, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman holds up her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in Kabul June 14, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman holds up her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in Kabul June 14, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman holds up her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in Kabul June 14, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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Robina Jelali, an Afghan candidate for the parliamentary election speaks on her phone at her office in Kabul September 7, 2010.  The 25-year-old is an ex-Olympic runner and head of a women's charity in Kabul. REUTERS/Stringer

Robina Jelali, an Afghan candidate for the parliamentary election speaks on her phone at her office in Kabul September 7, 2010.  The 25-year-old is an ex-Olympic runner and head of a women's charity in Kabul. REUTERS/Stringer

Robina Jelali, an Afghan candidate for the parliamentary election speaks on her phone at her office in Kabul September 7, 2010.  The 25-year-old is an ex-Olympic runner and head of a women's charity in Kabul. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women wait in line to cast their votes at a polling station in Kabul June 14, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women wait in line to cast their votes at a polling station in Kabul June 14, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women wait in line to cast their votes at a polling station in Kabul June 14, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman looks into a compact mirror as she waits to receive her voter card at a voter registration centre in Kabul March 30, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman looks into a compact mirror as she waits to receive her voter card at a voter registration centre in Kabul March 30, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman looks into a compact mirror as she waits to receive her voter card at a voter registration centre in Kabul March 30, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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Female Afghan National Police (ANP) officers aim their weapons during a drill at a training centre near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Stringer

Female Afghan National Police (ANP) officers aim their weapons during a drill at a training centre near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Stringer

Female Afghan National Police (ANP) officers aim their weapons during a drill at a training centre near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan female prisoners sit on their bed at Herat's prison for women, western Afghanistan, December 8, 2013.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan female prisoners sit on their bed at Herat's prison for women, western Afghanistan, December 8, 2013.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan female prisoners sit on their bed at Herat's prison for women, western Afghanistan, December 8, 2013.  REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan doctor explains the use of condoms to a group of women experiencing addiction at a counseling session at the Nejat drug rehabilitation centre, an organisation funded by the United Nations providing harm reduction and HIV/AIDS awareness, in Kabul January 29, 2012.  REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan doctor explains the use of condoms to a group of women experiencing addiction at a counseling session at the Nejat drug rehabilitation centre, an organisation funded by the United Nations providing harm reduction and HIV/AIDS awareness, in...more

An Afghan doctor explains the use of condoms to a group of women experiencing addiction at a counseling session at the Nejat drug rehabilitation centre, an organisation funded by the United Nations providing harm reduction and HIV/AIDS awareness, in Kabul January 29, 2012.  REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan policewoman holds a baton during riot training in Kabul October 3, 2004. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan policewoman holds a baton during riot training in Kabul October 3, 2004. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan policewoman holds a baton during riot training in Kabul October 3, 2004. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women practise inside a boxing club in Kabul December 26, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women practise inside a boxing club in Kabul December 26, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women practise inside a boxing club in Kabul December 26, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer
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A female soccer player controls a ball during a training session at the Golab Trust Sport Complex in Kabul March 10, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

A female soccer player controls a ball during a training session at the Golab Trust Sport Complex in Kabul March 10, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

A female soccer player controls a ball during a training session at the Golab Trust Sport Complex in Kabul March 10, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan female powerlifter demonstrates during a local sport ceremony in a stadium in Kabul March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan female powerlifter demonstrates during a local sport ceremony in a stadium in Kabul March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan female powerlifter demonstrates during a local sport ceremony in a stadium in Kabul March 8, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan singer Aryana Sayeed performs during a "Peace Concert" organised by a youth organisation in Kabul October 19, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan singer Aryana Sayeed performs during a "Peace Concert" organised by a youth organisation in Kabul October 19, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan singer Aryana Sayeed performs during a "Peace Concert" organised by a youth organisation in Kabul October 19, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women take pictures during an election rally in support of their President Hamid Karzai in Kandahar province August 16, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women take pictures during an election rally in support of their President Hamid Karzai in Kandahar province August 16, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women take pictures during an election rally in support of their President Hamid Karzai in Kandahar province August 16, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer
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A blind Afghan student reads Braille during a lesson at a blind school in Kabul September 4, 2012. The vocational blind school was established in 1977. REUTERS/Stringer

A blind Afghan student reads Braille during a lesson at a blind school in Kabul September 4, 2012. The vocational blind school was established in 1977. REUTERS/Stringer

A blind Afghan student reads Braille during a lesson at a blind school in Kabul September 4, 2012. The vocational blind school was established in 1977. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan teacher teaches chemistry in a Turkish-Afghan school in Herat December 12, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan teacher teaches chemistry in a Turkish-Afghan school in Herat December 12, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan teacher teaches chemistry in a Turkish-Afghan school in Herat December 12, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan girls work at the first women-only Internet cafe in Kabul March 8, 2012. The internet cafe hoped to give women a chance to connect to the world without verbal and sexual harassment and free from the unwanted gazes of their countrymen.  REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls work at the first women-only Internet cafe in Kabul March 8, 2012. The internet cafe hoped to give women a chance to connect to the world without verbal and sexual harassment and free from the unwanted gazes of their countrymen....more

Afghan girls work at the first women-only Internet cafe in Kabul March 8, 2012. The internet cafe hoped to give women a chance to connect to the world without verbal and sexual harassment and free from the unwanted gazes of their countrymen.  REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan students attend a commencement ceremony at Kabul University April 13, 2008. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan students attend a commencement ceremony at Kabul University April 13, 2008. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan students attend a commencement ceremony at Kabul University April 13, 2008. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan girl reads from the board in a home-based school in Kabul December 2, 2001. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl reads from the board in a home-based school in Kabul December 2, 2001. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl reads from the board in a home-based school in Kabul December 2, 2001. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman artisan works on a form of embroidery called Khamak at Kandahar Treasure facilities in Kandahar city, June 14, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman artisan works on a form of embroidery called Khamak at Kandahar Treasure facilities in Kandahar city, June 14, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman artisan works on a form of embroidery called Khamak at Kandahar Treasure facilities in Kandahar city, June 14, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan women, majority whom are widows, work at a wool processing workshop in Herat, western Afghanistan August 18, 2009. The women clean the wool and pack them in boxes to export out of the country. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women, majority whom are widows, work at a wool processing workshop in Herat, western Afghanistan August 18, 2009. The women clean the wool and pack them in boxes to export out of the country. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan women, majority whom are widows, work at a wool processing workshop in Herat, western Afghanistan August 18, 2009. The women clean the wool and pack them in boxes to export out of the country. REUTERS/Stringer
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Nima Suratgar, an Afghan parliamentary candidate, talks to supporters as she meets with a group of teachers in Kabul September 15, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Nima Suratgar, an Afghan parliamentary candidate, talks to supporters as she meets with a group of teachers in Kabul September 15, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Nima Suratgar, an Afghan parliamentary candidate, talks to supporters as she meets with a group of teachers in Kabul September 15, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer
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Latefa Meeran, a 32-year-old Afghan artist and university art lecturer, works on an oil colour painting in her home in the Afghan capital Kabul on May 16, 2004. Meeran, one of a small number of female artists in Afghanistan, was forced to give up her profession when the Taliban seized Kabul on her wedding day. Now she uses her brush to publicize Afghan women's struggle for equality. REUTERS/Stringer

Latefa Meeran, a 32-year-old Afghan artist and university art lecturer, works on an oil colour painting in her home in the Afghan capital Kabul on May 16, 2004. Meeran, one of a small number of female artists in Afghanistan, was forced to give up her...more

Latefa Meeran, a 32-year-old Afghan artist and university art lecturer, works on an oil colour painting in her home in the Afghan capital Kabul on May 16, 2004. Meeran, one of a small number of female artists in Afghanistan, was forced to give up her profession when the Taliban seized Kabul on her wedding day. Now she uses her brush to publicize Afghan women's struggle for equality. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan girl walks past a U.S soldier from 4-73 Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne on patrol in the town of Hutal in Maiwand district in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl walks past a U.S soldier from 4-73 Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne on patrol in the town of Hutal in Maiwand district in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl walks past a U.S soldier from 4-73 Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne on patrol in the town of Hutal in Maiwand district in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan April 5, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer
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A boy plays with his toy gun as other children look on in Kabul September 13, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

A boy plays with his toy gun as other children look on in Kabul September 13, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

A boy plays with his toy gun as other children look on in Kabul September 13, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer
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Two Afghan girls gather as a soldier from Camp Nathan Smith visits their village of Mirwaise Mina, southwest of Kandahar City centre, May 9, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Two Afghan girls gather as a soldier from Camp Nathan Smith visits their village of Mirwaise Mina, southwest of Kandahar City centre, May 9, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Two Afghan girls gather as a soldier from Camp Nathan Smith visits their village of Mirwaise Mina, southwest of Kandahar City centre, May 9, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan school girls receive treatment in a hospital after dozens of students fell ill in two suspected poisonous gas attacks on schools in Kabul May 11, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan school girls receive treatment in a hospital after dozens of students fell ill in two suspected poisonous gas attacks on schools in Kabul May 11, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan school girls receive treatment in a hospital after dozens of students fell ill in two suspected poisonous gas attacks on schools in Kabul May 11, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman and her child sit in the middle of a road as they beg for money from passing drivers in Kabul's suburbs August 29, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman and her child sit in the middle of a road as they beg for money from passing drivers in Kabul's suburbs August 29, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman and her child sit in the middle of a road as they beg for money from passing drivers in Kabul's suburbs August 29, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer
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Shamsia, 17, victim of an acid attack by the Taliban, lies on a bed at a hospital in Kabul November 15, 2008. The Taliban, which does not permit women to attend school, attacked Shamsia two days earlier as she was on her way to class with 15 other schoolgirls, according to police.     REUTERS/Stringer

Shamsia, 17, victim of an acid attack by the Taliban, lies on a bed at a hospital in Kabul November 15, 2008. The Taliban, which does not permit women to attend school, attacked Shamsia two days earlier as she was on her way to class with 15 other...more

Shamsia, 17, victim of an acid attack by the Taliban, lies on a bed at a hospital in Kabul November 15, 2008. The Taliban, which does not permit women to attend school, attacked Shamsia two days earlier as she was on her way to class with 15 other schoolgirls, according to police.     REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan girl stands among widows clad in burqas during a cash for work project by humanitarian organisation CARE International in Kabul January 6, 2010.  REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl stands among widows clad in burqas during a cash for work project by humanitarian organisation CARE International in Kabul January 6, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan girl stands among widows clad in burqas during a cash for work project by humanitarian organisation CARE International in Kabul January 6, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer
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A woman speaks with an election official as she prepares to vote in the Afghan election in Mazar e Sharif in northern Afghanistan August 20, 2009.  REUTERS/Stringer

A woman speaks with an election official as she prepares to vote in the Afghan election in Mazar e Sharif in northern Afghanistan August 20, 2009.  REUTERS/Stringer

A woman speaks with an election official as she prepares to vote in the Afghan election in Mazar e Sharif in northern Afghanistan August 20, 2009.  REUTERS/Stringer
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Afghan girls watch a performance during a mine awareness ceremony organized by the Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan (MACCA) in Kabul February 23, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls watch a performance during a mine awareness ceremony organized by the Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan (MACCA) in Kabul February 23, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Afghan girls watch a performance during a mine awareness ceremony organized by the Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan (MACCA) in Kabul February 23, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman attends a ceremony marking the beginning of campaigning at presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani's camp in Kabul June 16, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman attends a ceremony marking the beginning of campaigning at presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani's camp in Kabul June 16, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

An Afghan woman attends a ceremony marking the beginning of campaigning at presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani's camp in Kabul June 16, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer
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An Afghan woman wearing a traditional Burqa walks on the side of a road as a Northern Alliance APC, (Armoured Personnel Carrier) carrying fighters and the Afghan flag, drives to a new position in the outskirts of Jabal us Seraj, some 60 kms north of the Afghan capital Kabul November 4, 2001. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis

An Afghan woman wearing a traditional Burqa walks on the side of a road as a Northern Alliance APC, (Armoured Personnel Carrier) carrying fighters and the Afghan flag, drives to a new position in the outskirts of Jabal us Seraj, some 60 kms north of...more

An Afghan woman wearing a traditional Burqa walks on the side of a road as a Northern Alliance APC, (Armoured Personnel Carrier) carrying fighters and the Afghan flag, drives to a new position in the outskirts of Jabal us Seraj, some 60 kms north of the Afghan capital Kabul November 4, 2001. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
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A girl smiles as she walks on a road as snow falls in Kabul January 13, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

A girl smiles as she walks on a road as snow falls in Kabul January 13, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer

A girl smiles as she walks on a road as snow falls in Kabul January 13, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer
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Veiled Afghan women ride in the trunk of a car in Charikar, north of Kabul, February 18, 2003. REUTERS/Stringer

Veiled Afghan women ride in the trunk of a car in Charikar, north of Kabul, February 18, 2003. REUTERS/Stringer

Veiled Afghan women ride in the trunk of a car in Charikar, north of Kabul, February 18, 2003. REUTERS/Stringer
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