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Pictures | Fri Jan 29, 2016 | 8:40pm EST

The Zika babies

Geovane Silva holds his son Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Geovane Silva holds his son Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Geovane Silva holds his son Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Sueli Maria (obscured) holds her seven-day-old daughter Milena, who has microcephaly, at a hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. Health authorities in the Brazilian state at the center of a rapidly spreading Zika outbreak have been overwhelmed by the alarming surge in cases of babies born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder associated with the mosquito-borne virus. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sueli Maria (obscured) holds her seven-day-old daughter Milena, who has microcephaly, at a hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. Health authorities in the Brazilian state at the center of a rapidly spreading Zika outbreak have been...more

Sueli Maria (obscured) holds her seven-day-old daughter Milena, who has microcephaly, at a hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. Health authorities in the Brazilian state at the center of a rapidly spreading Zika outbreak have been overwhelmed by the alarming surge in cases of babies born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder associated with the mosquito-borne virus. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. The baby was born with microcephaly, which also affected his vision. Brazil's Health Ministry said in November that Zika was linked to a fetal deformation known as microcephaly, in which infants are born with smaller-than-usual brains. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. The baby was born with microcephaly, which also affected his...more

Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. The baby was born with microcephaly, which also affected his vision. Brazil's Health Ministry said in November that Zika was linked to a fetal deformation known as microcephaly, in which infants are born with smaller-than-usual brains. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Maria Clara (L) and Camile Vitoria pose for picture with their brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Maria Clara (L) and Camile Vitoria pose for picture with their brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Maria Clara (L) and Camile Vitoria pose for picture with their brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Gleyse Kelly holds her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Gleyse Kelly holds her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Gleyse Kelly holds her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Felipe holds the head of his daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, at his house in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Felipe holds the head of his daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, at his house in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Felipe holds the head of his daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, at his house in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Child neurologist Vanessa Van Der Linden observes the X-ray of a baby's skull with microcephaly at the hospital Barao de Lucena in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. Brazil has reported 3,893 suspected cases of microcephaly, the WHO said last Friday, over 30 times more than in any year since 2010 and equivalent to 1-2 percent of all newborns in the state of Pernambuco, one of the worst-hit areas. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Child neurologist Vanessa Van Der Linden observes the X-ray of a baby's skull with microcephaly at the hospital Barao de Lucena in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. Brazil has reported 3,893 suspected cases of microcephaly, the WHO said last Friday,...more

Child neurologist Vanessa Van Der Linden observes the X-ray of a baby's skull with microcephaly at the hospital Barao de Lucena in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. Brazil has reported 3,893 suspected cases of microcephaly, the WHO said last Friday, over 30 times more than in any year since 2010 and equivalent to 1-2 percent of all newborns in the state of Pernambuco, one of the worst-hit areas. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. TREUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. TREUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. TREUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, has his head measured by a neurologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, has his head measured by a neurologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, has his head measured by a neurologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Gleyce Kelly embraces her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Gleyce Kelly embraces her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Gleyce Kelly embraces her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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A nurse of the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital prepares to draw blood from baby who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

A nurse of the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital prepares to draw blood from baby who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

A nurse of the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital prepares to draw blood from baby who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Mothers with their children, who have microcephaly, await medical care at the Hospital Oswaldo Cruz, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Mothers with their children, who have microcephaly, await medical care at the Hospital Oswaldo Cruz, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Mothers with their children, who have microcephaly, await medical care at the Hospital Oswaldo Cruz, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Oswaldo Cruz Hospital staff prepare to draw blood from baby Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016.  REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Oswaldo Cruz Hospital staff prepare to draw blood from baby Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Oswaldo Cruz Hospital staff prepare to draw blood from baby Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Rain Gomes waits for medical care with her son Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Rain Gomes waits for medical care with her son Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Rain Gomes waits for medical care with her son Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Pregnant women wait for a routine general checkup, which includes a test for mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, at the maternity ward of the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera

Pregnant women wait for a routine general checkup, which includes a test for mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, at the maternity ward of the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera

Pregnant women wait for a routine general checkup, which includes a test for mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, at the maternity ward of the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
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Hilda Venancio bathes her son Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Hilda Venancio bathes her son Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Hilda Venancio bathes her son Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, son of Jaqueline Maria and Geovane Silva, undergoes medical treatment at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, son of Jaqueline Maria and Geovane Silva, undergoes medical treatment at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, son of Jaqueline Maria and Geovane Silva, undergoes medical treatment at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Camile Vitoria embraces her brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016.  REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Camile Vitoria embraces her brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Camile Vitoria embraces her brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Veridiana Silva (R) waits for medical care for her daughter Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Veridiana Silva (R) waits for medical care for her daughter Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Veridiana Silva (R) waits for medical care for her daughter Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Hospital staff Oswaldo Cruz prepares to draw blood from baby Lorrany Emily da Silva, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Hospital staff Oswaldo Cruz prepares to draw blood from baby Lorrany Emily da Silva, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Hospital staff Oswaldo Cruz prepares to draw blood from baby Lorrany Emily da Silva, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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