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Timeline: U.S.-Cuba relations

January 1, 1959: U.S.-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista flees Cuba as Fidel Castro (R, waving) and his revolutionaries seize control. Two years later, on January 3, 1961, the U.S. breaks off diplomatic relations with Cuba after the nationalization of U.S.-owned properties. REUTERS/Granma/Handout

January 1, 1959: U.S.-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista flees Cuba as Fidel Castro (R, waving) and his revolutionaries seize control. Two years later, on January 3, 1961, the U.S. breaks off diplomatic relations with Cuba after the nationalization of...more

January 1, 1959: U.S.-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista flees Cuba as Fidel Castro (R, waving) and his revolutionaries seize control. Two years later, on January 3, 1961, the U.S. breaks off diplomatic relations with Cuba after the nationalization of U.S.-owned properties. REUTERS/Granma/Handout
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April 16, 1961: Castro declares his revolution is socialist. The next day, CIA-backed Cuban exiles try to invade Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, but are defeated. Pictured: Fidel Castro enters a public trial of captured members of the Bay of Pigs invasion (seated). REUTERS/Prensa Latina

April 16, 1961: Castro declares his revolution is socialist. The next day, CIA-backed Cuban exiles try to invade Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, but are defeated. Pictured: Fidel Castro enters a public trial of captured members of the Bay of Pigs invasion...more

April 16, 1961: Castro declares his revolution is socialist. The next day, CIA-backed Cuban exiles try to invade Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, but are defeated. Pictured: Fidel Castro enters a public trial of captured members of the Bay of Pigs invasion (seated). REUTERS/Prensa Latina
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October 1962: The United States discovers Soviet nuclear missiles on Cuba, leading to a showdown with the Soviet Union that almost leads to war. The confrontation ends with the Russians removing the missiles and the United States agreeing never to invade Cuba and, secretly, pulling its missiles from Turkey. Pictured: President John F. Kennedy signs a proclamation for the interdiction of the delivery of offensive weapons to Cuba during the Cuban missile crisis, October 23, 1962. REUTERS/Cecil Stoughton/The White House/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

October 1962: The United States discovers Soviet nuclear missiles on Cuba, leading to a showdown with the Soviet Union that almost leads to war. The confrontation ends with the Russians removing the missiles and the United States agreeing never to...more

October 1962: The United States discovers Soviet nuclear missiles on Cuba, leading to a showdown with the Soviet Union that almost leads to war. The confrontation ends with the Russians removing the missiles and the United States agreeing never to invade Cuba and, secretly, pulling its missiles from Turkey. Pictured: President John F. Kennedy signs a proclamation for the interdiction of the delivery of offensive weapons to Cuba during the Cuban missile crisis, October 23, 1962. REUTERS/Cecil Stoughton/The White House/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library
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April-October 1980: Cuba allows 125,000 people to travel to the United States from the port of Mariel in what becomes known as the Mariel Boatlift. Pictured: A couple walk past the remains of the old Peruvian Embassy in Havana, where the 1980 Mariel boatlift originated with a rush on the diplomatic building by thousands of would-be Cuban immigrants to the United States. REUTERS/Rafael Perez

April-October 1980: Cuba allows 125,000 people to travel to the United States from the port of Mariel in what becomes known as the Mariel Boatlift. Pictured: A couple walk past the remains of the old Peruvian Embassy in Havana, where the 1980 Mariel...more

April-October 1980: Cuba allows 125,000 people to travel to the United States from the port of Mariel in what becomes known as the Mariel Boatlift. Pictured: A couple walk past the remains of the old Peruvian Embassy in Havana, where the 1980 Mariel boatlift originated with a rush on the diplomatic building by thousands of would-be Cuban immigrants to the United States. REUTERS/Rafael Perez
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December 1991: The Soviet Union, Cuba's biggest benefactor, collapses, touching off an economic crisis from which the island has not fully recovered. REUTERS/Stringer

December 1991: The Soviet Union, Cuba's biggest benefactor, collapses, touching off an economic crisis from which the island has not fully recovered. REUTERS/Stringer

December 1991: The Soviet Union, Cuba's biggest benefactor, collapses, touching off an economic crisis from which the island has not fully recovered. REUTERS/Stringer
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August-September 1994: More than 35,000 people leave Cuba in fragile boats, headed for the United States. REUTERS/Rolando Pujol Rodriguez

August-September 1994: More than 35,000 people leave Cuba in fragile boats, headed for the United States. REUTERS/Rolando Pujol Rodriguez

August-September 1994: More than 35,000 people leave Cuba in fragile boats, headed for the United States. REUTERS/Rolando Pujol Rodriguez
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March 1999: The Clinton administration approves a two-game exhibition series between the Baltimore Orioles and Cuban national baseball team, marking the first time a Major League Baseball team played in Cuba since 1959. Pictured: Fidel Castro talks with Orioles slugger Albert Belle prior to the game in Cuba. REUTERS/Andy Clark

March 1999: The Clinton administration approves a two-game exhibition series between the Baltimore Orioles and Cuban national baseball team, marking the first time a Major League Baseball team played in Cuba since 1959. Pictured: Fidel Castro talks...more

March 1999: The Clinton administration approves a two-game exhibition series between the Baltimore Orioles and Cuban national baseball team, marking the first time a Major League Baseball team played in Cuba since 1959. Pictured: Fidel Castro talks with Orioles slugger Albert Belle prior to the game in Cuba. REUTERS/Andy Clark
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September 1998: Five Cuban intelligence officers, known as the "Cuban Five," are arrested and later convicted of espionage, conspiracy to commit murder and other illegal activities in the U.S. The five were eventually released, in a period from 2011-2014. REUTERS/Stringer

September 1998: Five Cuban intelligence officers, known as the "Cuban Five," are arrested and later convicted of espionage, conspiracy to commit murder and other illegal activities in the U.S. The five were eventually released, in a period from...more

September 1998: Five Cuban intelligence officers, known as the "Cuban Five," are arrested and later convicted of espionage, conspiracy to commit murder and other illegal activities in the U.S. The five were eventually released, in a period from 2011-2014. REUTERS/Stringer
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November 1999: Cuban child Elian Gonzalez is rescued from a capsized boat near the Florida coast, as he, his mother and her boyfriend attempted to reach the U.S. A custody battle erupts, pitting Castro's government against the Cuban-American community. The boy's maternal relatives sought to keep him in the U.S., but the boy's Cuban father finally won the legal battle in U.S. courts and took Elian home on June 28, 2000. REUTERS/Alan Diaz/Pool

November 1999: Cuban child Elian Gonzalez is rescued from a capsized boat near the Florida coast, as he, his mother and her boyfriend attempted to reach the U.S. A custody battle erupts, pitting Castro's government against the Cuban-American...more

November 1999: Cuban child Elian Gonzalez is rescued from a capsized boat near the Florida coast, as he, his mother and her boyfriend attempted to reach the U.S. A custody battle erupts, pitting Castro's government against the Cuban-American community. The boy's maternal relatives sought to keep him in the U.S., but the boy's Cuban father finally won the legal battle in U.S. courts and took Elian home on June 28, 2000. REUTERS/Alan Diaz/Pool
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2002: In the months after September 11, portions of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, which opened in 1903, are turned into a detention center for enemy combatants. REUTERS/Stringer

2002: In the months after September 11, portions of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, which opened in 1903, are turned into a detention center for enemy combatants. REUTERS/Stringer

2002: In the months after September 11, portions of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, which opened in 1903, are turned into a detention center for enemy combatants. REUTERS/Stringer
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2004: Following George W. Bush's re-election, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice declares Cuba to be one of the "outposts of tyranny" in the world. Later, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs John R. Bolton declares Castro's government as part of America's "axis of evil". REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

2004: Following George W. Bush's re-election, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice declares Cuba to be one of the "outposts of tyranny" in the world. Later, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs John R. Bolton...more

2004: Following George W. Bush's re-election, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice declares Cuba to be one of the "outposts of tyranny" in the world. Later, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs John R. Bolton declares Castro's government as part of America's "axis of evil". REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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July 31, 2006: Fidel Castro, seen here being visited by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, provisionally turns over power to his brother, Raul Castro, after undergoing emergency intestinal surgery. REUTERS/Estudios Revolucion-Granma/Handout

July 31, 2006: Fidel Castro, seen here being visited by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, provisionally turns over power to his brother, Raul Castro, after undergoing emergency intestinal surgery. REUTERS/Estudios Revolucion-Granma/Handout

July 31, 2006: Fidel Castro, seen here being visited by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, provisionally turns over power to his brother, Raul Castro, after undergoing emergency intestinal surgery. REUTERS/Estudios Revolucion-Granma/Handout
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February 24, 2008: The National Assembly elects Raul Castro to formally replace the ailing Fidel. REUTERS/Prensa Latina/Pool

February 24, 2008: The National Assembly elects Raul Castro to formally replace the ailing Fidel. REUTERS/Prensa Latina/Pool

February 24, 2008: The National Assembly elects Raul Castro to formally replace the ailing Fidel. REUTERS/Prensa Latina/Pool
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December 10, 2013: Barack Obama and Raul Castro shake hands at a state memorial service for Nelson Mandela. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

December 10, 2013: Barack Obama and Raul Castro shake hands at a state memorial service for Nelson Mandela. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

December 10, 2013: Barack Obama and Raul Castro shake hands at a state memorial service for Nelson Mandela. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
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December 2014: Cuba releases Alan Gross, 65, who had been imprisoned in Cuba for five years. Cuba convicted the U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor to 15 years in prison after accusing him of importing banned technology and trying to establish a clandestine Internet service for Cuban Jews. Pictured: Gross embraces Tim Rieser, a member of Senator Patrick Leahy's office, on the tarmac as he disembarks from a U.S. government plane with wife Judy (L). REUTERS/Jill Zuckman/Gross Family Spokesperson/Handout via Reuters

December 2014: Cuba releases Alan Gross, 65, who had been imprisoned in Cuba for five years. Cuba convicted the U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor to 15 years in prison after accusing him of importing banned technology and trying...more

December 2014: Cuba releases Alan Gross, 65, who had been imprisoned in Cuba for five years. Cuba convicted the U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor to 15 years in prison after accusing him of importing banned technology and trying to establish a clandestine Internet service for Cuban Jews. Pictured: Gross embraces Tim Rieser, a member of Senator Patrick Leahy's office, on the tarmac as he disembarks from a U.S. government plane with wife Judy (L). REUTERS/Jill Zuckman/Gross Family Spokesperson/Handout via Reuters
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2013: Cuban and U.S. officials begin secret talks brokered in part by Pope Francis, and hosted in Canada and Vatican City. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

2013: Cuban and U.S. officials begin secret talks brokered in part by Pope Francis, and hosted in Canada and Vatican City. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

2013: Cuban and U.S. officials begin secret talks brokered in part by Pope Francis, and hosted in Canada and Vatican City. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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January 16, 2015: The United States rolls out a sweeping set of measures to significantly ease sanctions on Cuba, opening up the country to expanded U.S. travel, trade and financial activities. Limited import of items such as Cuban cigars and rum to the U.S. is allowed, as is the export of American computer and telecommunications technology to Cuba. The 54-year-old U.S. embargo on Cuba remained in place - only Congress can lift it. REUTERS/Stringer

January 16, 2015: The United States rolls out a sweeping set of measures to significantly ease sanctions on Cuba, opening up the country to expanded U.S. travel, trade and financial activities. Limited import of items such as Cuban cigars and rum to...more

January 16, 2015: The United States rolls out a sweeping set of measures to significantly ease sanctions on Cuba, opening up the country to expanded U.S. travel, trade and financial activities. Limited import of items such as Cuban cigars and rum to the U.S. is allowed, as is the export of American computer and telecommunications technology to Cuba. The 54-year-old U.S. embargo on Cuba remained in place - only Congress can lift it. REUTERS/Stringer
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July 1, 2015: Barack Obama announces formal diplomatic relations will resume, with embassies reopening in Washington and Havana. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

July 1, 2015: Barack Obama announces formal diplomatic relations will resume, with embassies reopening in Washington and Havana. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

July 1, 2015: Barack Obama announces formal diplomatic relations will resume, with embassies reopening in Washington and Havana. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
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August 14, 2015: U.S. Marines raise the American flag at the embassy in Cuba for the first time in 54 years, symbolically ushering in an era of renewed diplomatic relations between the two Cold War-era foes. REUTERS/Stringer

August 14, 2015: U.S. Marines raise the American flag at the embassy in Cuba for the first time in 54 years, symbolically ushering in an era of renewed diplomatic relations between the two Cold War-era foes. REUTERS/Stringer

August 14, 2015: U.S. Marines raise the American flag at the embassy in Cuba for the first time in 54 years, symbolically ushering in an era of renewed diplomatic relations between the two Cold War-era foes. REUTERS/Stringer
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March 21, 2016: Barack Obama makes a historic trip to Cuba, the first visit by a sitting U.S. president since 1928. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

March 21, 2016: Barack Obama makes a historic trip to Cuba, the first visit by a sitting U.S. president since 1928. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

March 21, 2016: Barack Obama makes a historic trip to Cuba, the first visit by a sitting U.S. president since 1928. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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August 31, 2016: The first scheduled commercial passenger flight from the United States to Cuba in more than half a century lands. A JetBlue Airways Corp passenger jet arrived from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in the central Cuban city of Santa Clara. The route may be a commercial challenge, at least initially, but it is the first of a plethora of new flights by various U.S. airlines to destinations on the Communist-ruled island.

REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

August 31, 2016: The first scheduled commercial passenger flight from the United States to Cuba in more than half a century lands. A JetBlue Airways Corp passenger jet arrived from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in the central Cuban city of Santa Clara....more

August 31, 2016: The first scheduled commercial passenger flight from the United States to Cuba in more than half a century lands. A JetBlue Airways Corp passenger jet arrived from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in the central Cuban city of Santa Clara. The route may be a commercial challenge, at least initially, but it is the first of a plethora of new flights by various U.S. airlines to destinations on the Communist-ruled island. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
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June 16, 2017: President Donald Trump ordered tighter restrictions on Americans traveling to Cuba and a clampdown on U.S. business dealings with the island's military, saying he was canceling former President Barack Obama's "terrible and misguided deal" with Havana from 2014. But Trump was leaving in place many of Obama's changes, including the reopened U.S. embassy in Havana, even as he sought to show he was making good on a campaign promise to take a tougher line against Cuba.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

June 16, 2017: President Donald Trump ordered tighter restrictions on Americans traveling to Cuba and a clampdown on U.S. business dealings with the island's military, saying he was canceling former President Barack Obama's "terrible and misguided...more

June 16, 2017: President Donald Trump ordered tighter restrictions on Americans traveling to Cuba and a clampdown on U.S. business dealings with the island's military, saying he was canceling former President Barack Obama's "terrible and misguided deal" with Havana from 2014. But Trump was leaving in place many of Obama's changes, including the reopened U.S. embassy in Havana, even as he sought to show he was making good on a campaign promise to take a tougher line against Cuba. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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September 29, 2017: The United States cut its diplomatic presence in Cuba by more than half and warned U.S. citizens not to visit because of mysterious "attacks" that have caused hearing loss, dizziness and fatigue in U.S. embassy personnel. Twenty-one embassy employees have been injured and reported symptoms such as hearing loss, dizziness, headache, fatigue, cognitive issues, and difficulty sleeping, the State Department said. The Cuban government has denied any role and is investigating. The U.S. embassy in Havana will halt regular visa operations for Cubans seeking to visit the United States and offer only emergency services to U.S. citizens, steps that may further erode the U.S.-Cuban rapprochement begun by former President Barack Obama. Officials in President Donald Trump's administration stressed the United States was maintaining diplomatic ties with Cuba.

REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

September 29, 2017: The United States cut its diplomatic presence in Cuba by more than half and warned U.S. citizens not to visit because of mysterious "attacks" that have caused hearing loss, dizziness and fatigue in U.S. embassy personnel....more

September 29, 2017: The United States cut its diplomatic presence in Cuba by more than half and warned U.S. citizens not to visit because of mysterious "attacks" that have caused hearing loss, dizziness and fatigue in U.S. embassy personnel. Twenty-one embassy employees have been injured and reported symptoms such as hearing loss, dizziness, headache, fatigue, cognitive issues, and difficulty sleeping, the State Department said. The Cuban government has denied any role and is investigating. The U.S. embassy in Havana will halt regular visa operations for Cubans seeking to visit the United States and offer only emergency services to U.S. citizens, steps that may further erode the U.S.-Cuban rapprochement begun by former President Barack Obama. Officials in President Donald Trump's administration stressed the United States was maintaining diplomatic ties with Cuba. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
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