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Voters in tsunami-hit zone feel let down as Japan election nears

Victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami observe a minute of silence at a shelter in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture, in this April 11, 2011 file photograph, marking the one month anniversary of the deadly quake which triggered the tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the magnitude 9.0 quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Toru Hanai/Files

Victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami observe a minute of silence at a shelter in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture, in this April 11, 2011 file photograph, marking the one month anniversary of the deadly quake which triggered the tsunami and...more

Victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami observe a minute of silence at a shelter in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture, in this April 11, 2011 file photograph, marking the one month anniversary of the deadly quake which triggered the tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the magnitude 9.0 quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Toru Hanai/Files
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A family offers prayers for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami at a seaside which was damaged by the disaster in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture, in this March 11, 2012 file photo. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the magnitude 9.0 quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Files

A family offers prayers for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami at a seaside which was damaged by the disaster in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture, in this March 11, 2012 file photo. Weeks before Japan's first national election on...more

A family offers prayers for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami at a seaside which was damaged by the disaster in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture, in this March 11, 2012 file photo. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the magnitude 9.0 quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Files
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People make their way as they look for their houses among the ruins of the destroyed residential part of Kamaishi, more than a week after the town was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in this March 20, 2011 file photograph. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the March 2011 earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files

People make their way as they look for their houses among the ruins of the destroyed residential part of Kamaishi, more than a week after the town was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in this March 20, 2011 file photograph. Weeks...more

People make their way as they look for their houses among the ruins of the destroyed residential part of Kamaishi, more than a week after the town was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in this March 20, 2011 file photograph. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the March 2011 earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files
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A woman sits next to a fire at an area destroyed by the tsunami in Kamaishi town, Iwate Prefecture in northern Japan in this March 25, 2011 file photo. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the magnitude 9.0 quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files

A woman sits next to a fire at an area destroyed by the tsunami in Kamaishi town, Iwate Prefecture in northern Japan in this March 25, 2011 file photo. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of...more

A woman sits next to a fire at an area destroyed by the tsunami in Kamaishi town, Iwate Prefecture in northern Japan in this March 25, 2011 file photo. Weeks before Japan's first national election on December 16, 2012, since the earthquake, none of the contenders has managed to win the hearts, and votes, of those hardest-hit by the disaster - with many feeling let down by the entire political class. Volunteers and donations had poured in after the magnitude 9.0 quake off the northeast coast of Japan's main island Honshu unleashed a deadly tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 and triggered reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear plant. But 20 months later, residents of towns and cities ravaged by the country's worst disaster in generations say the nation's biggest rebuilding effort since the aftermath of the World War Two has slipped off the political agenda. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files
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