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Pictures | Thu Jul 16, 2020 | 9:48am EDT

Wild animals unable to roam as city encroaches on Nairobi park

Rhinos, lions, buffalo and leopards range against the background of a city skyline in the Nairobi National Park, Africa's only game reserve within a capital city. The park has been fenced in on three sides as the city mushroomed around it.    REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Rhinos, lions, buffalo and leopards range against the background of a city skyline in the Nairobi National Park, Africa's only game reserve within a capital city. The park has been fenced in on three sides as the city mushroomed around it. ...more

Rhinos, lions, buffalo and leopards range against the background of a city skyline in the Nairobi National Park, Africa's only game reserve within a capital city. The park has been fenced in on three sides as the city mushroomed around it. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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Outside its unfenced southern boundary, the banks of the Mochiriri River are a favoured refuge for breeding lions. Animals often pass through to make their way to larger parks beyond.  REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Outside its unfenced southern boundary, the banks of the Mochiriri River are a favoured refuge for breeding lions. Animals often pass through to make their way to larger parks beyond. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Outside its unfenced southern boundary, the banks of the Mochiriri River are a favoured refuge for breeding lions. Animals often pass through to make their way to larger parks beyond. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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But the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has proposed a 10-year plan to fence land along the southern boundary to reduce conflict between people and animals. The idea has many conservationists up in arms    REUTERS/Baz Ratner

But the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has proposed a 10-year plan to fence land along the southern boundary to reduce conflict between people and animals. The idea has many conservationists up in arms REUTERS/Baz Ratner

But the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has proposed a 10-year plan to fence land along the southern boundary to reduce conflict between people and animals. The idea has many conservationists up in arms REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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Commercial buildings are encroaching on the park's land and in 2018, a six-km railway bridge was built through it. Sewage from nearby settlements empties into the river, KWS reports say.   

REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Commercial buildings are encroaching on the park's land and in 2018, a six-km railway bridge was built through it. Sewage from nearby settlements empties into the river, KWS reports say. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Commercial buildings are encroaching on the park's land and in 2018, a six-km railway bridge was built through it. Sewage from nearby settlements empties into the river, KWS reports say. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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Animals often leave the park during the rainy season when the grass is too long to see predators and return during the dry season when the grass inside is more lush. The park also links up to migration corridors leading to larger parks.  REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Animals often leave the park during the rainy season when the grass is too long to see predators and return during the dry season when the grass inside is more lush. The park also links up to migration corridors leading to larger parks. REUTERS/Baz...more

Animals often leave the park during the rainy season when the grass is too long to see predators and return during the dry season when the grass inside is more lush. The park also links up to migration corridors leading to larger parks. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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The plan proposes fencing in land on the southern boundary if the owners are willing, or if they do not agree, to fence the park itself.  

REUTERS/Baz Ratner

The plan proposes fencing in land on the southern boundary if the owners are willing, or if they do not agree, to fence the park itself. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

The plan proposes fencing in land on the southern boundary if the owners are willing, or if they do not agree, to fence the park itself. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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A 2016 KWS report said fencing was the "least suitable option" to reduce animal-human conflict. Shrinking ranges would cause conflict among rhinos and lions, other species could not migrate, and inbreeding would be a problem.   

REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A 2016 KWS report said fencing was the "least suitable option" to reduce animal-human conflict. Shrinking ranges would cause conflict among rhinos and lions, other species could not migrate, and inbreeding would be a problem. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A 2016 KWS report said fencing was the "least suitable option" to reduce animal-human conflict. Shrinking ranges would cause conflict among rhinos and lions, other species could not migrate, and inbreeding would be a problem. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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It is not the only option. The plan itself said conservation initiatives such as installing free motion-sensor lights to deter lions have already reduced human-animal conflict.  

 REUTERS/Baz Ratner

It is not the only option. The plan itself said conservation initiatives such as installing free motion-sensor lights to deter lions have already reduced human-animal conflict. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

It is not the only option. The plan itself said conservation initiatives such as installing free motion-sensor lights to deter lions have already reduced human-animal conflict. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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A buffalo walks under a bridge of the Standard Gauge Railway line, inside the Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A buffalo walks under a bridge of the Standard Gauge Railway line, inside the Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A buffalo walks under a bridge of the Standard Gauge Railway line, inside the Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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A view of an antelope inside the Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A view of an antelope inside the Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A view of an antelope inside the Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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A zebra scratches itself against a pillar of a bridge of the Standard Gauge Railway line inside the Nairobi National Park. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A zebra scratches itself against a pillar of a bridge of the Standard Gauge Railway line inside the Nairobi National Park. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

A zebra scratches itself against a pillar of a bridge of the Standard Gauge Railway line inside the Nairobi National Park. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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Zebras graze under the Standard Gauge Railway line, inside the Nairobi National Park. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Zebras graze under the Standard Gauge Railway line, inside the Nairobi National Park. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

Zebras graze under the Standard Gauge Railway line, inside the Nairobi National Park. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
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