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Rollout of revised travel ban was 'extremely' effective: Spicer

Monday, March 06, 2017 - 01:03

White House spokesman Sean Spicer said President Trump's revised travel ban was implemented ''extremely effectively''. The new order includes six Muslim-majority nations, but removes Iraq from the list. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: White House spokesman Sean Spicer called the rollout of President Trump's revised travel ban Monday as 'extremely' effective, but says the Trump administration believes the 'element of surprise' in the original ban kept the country safe. "I think you're seeing by all accounts today, it was extremely well received. The departments that are primarily responsible - State, Justice and Homeland Security - have done a phenomenal job at both briefing their staff, briefing members of Congress, briefing outside stakeholders and briefing the media," Spicer said. "When I think you look at this rollout and how this was done, it was done extremely effectively. There's a ten-day window to ensure that it goes into effect March 16th." President Trump's revised executive order on Monday banned citizens from six Muslim-majority nations from traveling to the United States but removed Iraq from the list, after Trump's controversial first attempt was blocked in the courts. The new order keeps a 90-day ban on travel to the United States by citizens of Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. It applies only to new visa applicants, meaning some 60,000 people whose visas were revoked under the previous order will now be permitted to enter. Immigration advocates said the new ban still discriminated against Muslims and failed to address some of their concerns with the previous order. Legal experts said it would, however, be harder to challenge because it affects fewer people living in the United States and allows more exemptions to protect them. Trump, who first proposed a temporary travel ban on Muslims during his presidential campaign last year, had said his original Jan. 27 executive order was a national security measure meant to head off attacks by Islamist militants. It sparked chaos and protests at airports, where visa holders were detained and later deported back to their home countries. It also drew criticism from targeted countries, Western allies and some of America's leading corporations before a U.S. judge suspended it on Feb. 3.

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Rollout of revised travel ban was 'extremely' effective: Spicer

Monday, March 06, 2017 - 01:03